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sguinzagliato

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by candel, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. candel Senior Member

    english Irish.
    Hi

    Reading of the election in Italy 2013. I read:

    Bersani vuole spianarsi la strada in vista dei difficili equilibri parlamentari che si profilano dopo il voto, ed ecco perché ha sguinzagliato due fedelissimi per iniziare a flirtare con i grillini.

    What does squinzagliare mean please?


    Bersani wants to pave the way in view of the difficult parliamentary balance which stands out after the vote, and that is why he has (....?) two of his most loyal followers to begin a flirtation with the "grillini"...

    Grazie :)
     
  2. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
  3. candel Senior Member

    english Irish.
    Grazie molto.
     
  4. giginho

    giginho Senior Member

    Svizzera / Torino
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Ciao Candel!

    Sguinzagliare is a term that we use to mean when you take the leash off from a dog and it's very often used in a figurative way. In this case it conveys the idea that Bersani sent his "fellas" like dogs hunting for some support. Maybe in english it will be translated as: Bersani let some good fellows out .....is it correct?
     
  5. turkjey5 Senior Member

    English - USA
    ...sent some followers to gather support.
     
  6. giginho

    giginho Senior Member

    Svizzera / Torino
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Hi Turkjey!

    Do we miss a bit the original sense of sguinzagliare with your suggestion, don't we?

    P.S. of course, please please please correct my english! thanks thanks thanks! :D
     
  7. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Ciao Gigi

    You can say unleash someone after or turn someone loose on, if you want to maintain the original metaphor. To let out simply means to allow to exit. ;)
     
  8. giginho

    giginho Senior Member

    Svizzera / Torino
    Italiano & Piemontese
    Ahahah! I was fooled by the song: "Who let the dogs out"!!!

    I like unleash someone after...thank you my friend!

    BTW: nice to see you again!!!! ci sei mancato, amico!
     
  9. candel Senior Member

    english Irish.
    Hi gigi.:).grazie...Trex is broadly correct, though unleash someone after sb is not an expression I would use or heard...though turn someone loose on is more familiar...though probably is a little aggressive but in keeping with the Italian metaphor...set someone on somebody is more common...set someone after someone also..

    Edit: (n)or (have) heard....the "have" was implied and yes it has a more spoken feel to it I admit..:)

    @Elfa...yes that is more the feel of how we would say it in proper English....:) I found your translation pretty cool:cool:
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  10. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    First, do you call this good English? I certainly don't.
    Second, you've never heard of "unleashing dogs/hounds/thugs/henchmen after/on/against someone"? Funny ;)
     
  11. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    Hi Teerex :)

    I agree with candel here that normally when you unleash dogs or people, it's not either against or after others. To me "on" is OK though. However, I don't think I would use "unleash" in this context, even though it can obviously be used figuratively in English, because it makes it sound as if Bersani's party is an angry bunch only just kept under control by the leader himself - not an image that's maybe appropriate. Here's a slightly free version which candel might find useful


    Bersani wants to smooth the path ahead in view of the tricky balance of power within parliament after the vote in the recent election, and this is the reason why he has discharged two of his most loyal party members to make [friendly] overtures to the so-called Grillini.
     
  12. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Hi Elfa :)

    I suppose the use of the proposition largely depends on the idea one wishes to convey. After indicates motion (a moving target), against denotes aggression and on is more of an all-rounder. Plenty of literature to support each case.

    As for the verb, I'm partial to to unleash as it's the exact translation of sguinzagliare, although a little stronger in English than it is in Italian. I guess "to release" would be a good compromise, or "turn loose" as I originally suggested.
    I have to confess, I don't like "to discharge", but it's entirely personal. ;)
     
  13. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Give ..... free rein to (make...)? Wrong animal, I know!:D
     
  14. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Jo, you break me up...:p

    (And we still haven't produced a decent translation for "fedelissimi" -- there's a certain degree of irony there)

    What about "two of his loyal lieutenants" (yes, I had to indulge in a little alliteration there ...and here, too :rolleyes:)
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2013
  15. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I was thinking the same.:) I'd be tempted to translate it as "disciples" or "supporters", but on the other hand they could almost be considered "missionaries"!:D. And if I were feeling really nasty, I'd say "lackeys".:D
     
  16. aefrizzo

    aefrizzo Senior Member

    Palermo, Italia
    italiano
    Un bambino frigna e ci assorda, mentre converso con la nonna (vecchia amica) che cerca di tenerlo vicino.
    Sarebbe troppo rude dirle: Unleash him?
     
  17. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Se il bambino non è al guinzaglio (e mi auguro di no) meglio dire "let him run loose" (che si dice anche di un cane):D
     

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