sheared

Discussion in 'Medical Terminology' started by ceci, Mar 2, 2005.

  1. ceci Senior Member

    chile
    10 ug/ml ADN sheared at 37º C
    que significa sheared??
     
  2. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hola ceci;
    Do you have any other information or context for this..It could be basic or it could also do with Physics--as in "Shering Stress"..??

    Looked it over again and it would be the Physics.."Sheared"--An applied force that tends to create a "shearing strain or stress" In easy terms--To become deformed by a force..
    ye gato;)
     
  3. mjscott Senior Member

    Was it perhaps seared? Is 37 degrees really warm enough to sear anything?

    To shear is to cut or crop something off--like shearing a sheep (verb), or pinking shears (noun--scissors that cut a zigzag line).

    Shear stress in a building is sideways stress on its members (not stress from up and down vertical gravity, these floors above me are getting heavy stress) from things like earthquakes or wind, or just sideways or twisting distribution of weight that happens in a building.
     
  4. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    I was a little confused as well..that is why I asked for more info..
    te gato;)
     
  5. lauranazario

    lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    Ceci,
    Por favor bríndanos contexto o trasfondo... ¿de qué industria/ especialización/proceso estamos hablando? Si nos brindas la oración completa, tampoco nos vendría mal.

    Saludos,
    LN
     
  6. ceci Senior Member

    chile
    this is the original text:
    50% formamide, 6xSSC, 5% denhardt's, 10 mM sodium phosphate, 10ug/ml sheared DNA at 42ºC
     
  7. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hola ceci;
    it is a whole process of preparing DNA for testing...preparación

    I. Shearing BAC DNA To shear the large insert insert BAC clone, use the Hydroshear by Genemachines. The settings will vary depending on which orifice you are using, and what size fragments you are trying to generate. New orifices need to be "calibrated" to determine proper settings. The standard we use, to generate predominately 2-5kb fragments is: Cycles: 20 Speed code:10-12.

    To make sure BAC DNA is in solution, incubate DNA at 37°C for 30 minutes, vortexing hard every 10 min. Centrifuge at 12,000 rpm for 4 minutes to determine if the DNA is completely in solution. The DNA is not in solution if a clear pellet can be observed. Transfer the top 190µl to a clean 1.5ml microfuge tube, and proceed with shearing. *Note: We have found that the following works well, when BACDNA is isolated from 500mls LB culture, using the Qiagen-500 tips, and resuspending in 600µl T10E1 at the end. Depending on how concentrated the DNA looks on a gel, dilute an aliquot in water. 100µl of BAC DNA diluted in 100µl water has worked well in the past.

    Shearing volume should not exceed 200µl
    Wash shearing orifices before and after each sample with the following settings:
    *All solutions must be filterd with a 0.2 micron filter before using.

    0.2 M HCl x2
    0.2 M NaOH x3
    ddH2O x5

    Please use the Hydroshear manual pgs. 45-46 for instructions to shear DNA.
    **Important: Before shearing, DNA must be in solution, or the Hydroshear will clog
    Sorry I can't help you on the translation of all that...
    te gato;)
     
  8. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    Encontré la explicación en

    http://www.cs.unc.edu/~guthold/Biomedical_Microdevices_3_9_2001.pdf

    Aparentemente, "shearing" significa el cambio de la forma B del ácido desoxirribonucleico a la forma S bajo la acción de fuerzas o enzimas (no sé cómo le dirán en español: ruptura, corte, escisión, vaya uno a saber). La forma B es la forma helicoidal, y la forma S es la forma extendida o estirada. Esto de aplicar fuerzas a moléculas para romperlas o modificarlas se hace por microscopía o por espectroscopía y se llama "microscopía de fuerza" o "espectroscopía de fuerza," donde se usan herramientas microscópicas para hacerlo.

    Mucho más que ésto no te puedo decir, porque es un vocabulario demasiado espacializado, con el que yo no estoy familiarizado.
     
  9. Badcell

    Badcell Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spain- Spanish
    Hola, Ceci."Sheared DNA" se refiere simplemente a DNA fragmentado. Al parecer estás traduciendo la receta para una hibridación Northern. Ese DNA posiblemente sea DNA de esperma de salmón y se haya fragmentado por sonicación, que es la forma más habitual. Ese DNA se mezcal con la formamida y lo demás para hacer el tampón de hibridación, que se incubará luego a 42ºC.
    Espero que te ayude.
    Saludos!
     
  10. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    Gracias, Badcell por el aporte. Tu explicación parece ser con conocimiento específico del tema, a diferencia de las nuestras que son más generales. Anoche dije qué era el "shearing" del ADN (DNA en inglés), pero me olvidé de decir qué es el shearing de una molécula en general: es simplemente la ruptura, corte, escisión o fragmentación bajo una fuerza mecánica. En el caso del ADN es la transformación de la forma B a la forma S. Shearing en física en general es el esfuerzo de corte de algo, especialmente se usa en lenguaje común referido al esfuerzo de corte de la tijera, por ejemplo.
     
  11. Badcell

    Badcell Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spain- Spanish
    Hola Sergio. La verdad es que no sé muy bien qué es la forma S del DNA. Recuerdo que la forma B es el DNA normal, y me parece recordar que había una forma Z levógira, pero ahí me quedo :)
    En este caso, con el contexto que dio Ceci, "sheared DNA" se refiere a DNA troceado, en fragmentos de unas pocas kilobases, frente a las gigabases de extensión que tiene el DNA en los cromosomas originales. Yo lo hago con un sonicador: sometiendo el DNA aultrasonidos se reompe en pedazos. No creo que implique ningún cambio de conformación de la molécula.
    Por otra parte, como tú dices shearing normalmente se refiere al esfuerzo de corte, y tiene que ver con las tijeras de podar o cizallas (shears). En biología al menos, el shearing stress se suele traducir por estrés de cizallamiento
    Saludos :)
     
  12. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    Hola, Badcell, gracias por las explicaciones y por el concepto de estrés de cizallamiento. No sabía cómo se dice en español. En el diccionario de la RAE dice "cizalladura," pero es posible que en la jerga científica exista esta otra inflexión de la palabra, como a menudo sucede.

    En cuanto a las formas B y S del DNA, lo busqué en un libro de biología celular (Lodish et al., 2000) y tampoco encontré la forma S. Solamente menciona las formas B (normal, 10 bases por vuelta), A (compacta, 11 bases por vuelta) y Z (hélice izquierda en zig-zag), y una cuarta forma de triple filamento a la que no le da nombre propio. Finalmente habla de los filamentos separados y "destorcidos" o "enderezados," no sé cómo se dirá en la jerga biológica española, a la que tampoco les da un nombre propio.

    Los únicos lugares donde encontré la forma S son dos artículos, uno es el que mencioné antes, y el otro es éste que sigue:

    http://www.lens.unifi.it/bio/pdf/prl01066.pdf

    Todos los otros artículos que encontré lo llaman simplemente "stretched DNA." Lo que no tuve ocasión o tiempo de indagar, fue si este S-DNA o stretched DNA se refiere al DNA estirado y dividido o simplemente estirado, es decir, si es monofilamento o doble filamento.
     
  13. mjscott Senior Member

    Yo sé que no debemeos decir nada personal si no tiene nada que ver con el asunto, pero ustedes quienes han contestado la llamada para apoyo del forero deben aplaudir a ustedes mismos. Si no conocen el contexto, ustedes necesitaban buscar las respuestas para ayudar a este persona.
    ¡Saludos a todos!
     
  14. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    You are right, mjscott, in that we have not found the exact definition our friend is looking for, but if nobody else came up with anything, we thought we could share whatever little research we did about the matter. If we got him or her more confused, it was not intentional. We are sorry and apologize profusely. Hopefully it will not happen again.

    Saludos.
     
  15. mjscott Senior Member

    I hope that you did not misunderstand that I was meaning to complement your eagerness in wanting to help someone in need! We all want to be accurate--if we each come at a definition from a different side, we can maybe give the person who needs it enough "views" to help them feel good about what it is they need to translate. I hope my Spanish did not get me in trouble by making it sound like I was judging anyone who helped the person with the definition of sheared. I was attempting to complement each of you on your helpfulness.
    Thank you.
     
  16. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    Thank you for your kind intention, mjscott, but as you correctly guessed, your Spanish was not very clear and I could not decipher the meaning of it. However, in case it was a critique, I apologized because, in a way, it is true that we did not end up solving the problem completely. It was just a bunch of "maybe" statements, loosely researched from the Internet and some textbooks.

    Optimally, someone with a specialty in that field should have responded, but I am sure you know full well, that someone with a specialty in that field does not have the time to play with language forums like we do, because they spend their 24 hours per day, and then some, in a research laboratory. So the task is left to aficionados like ourselves, although we have to recognize the contributions of Badcell, who seems to work in a biological lab and knows what he or she is talking about. He or she must have a Bachelor of Science or a Master in Biology, perhaps even a PhD. It is nice to have someone like Badcell in the forum.

    Anyway, don't worry about your comments, mjscott, we are here to learn from each other and do not get offended by other foreros' comments. We take everything as a constructive criticism, and if the emotional content of the comments is high, we just label them "very constructive."
     
  17. lauranazario

    lauranazario Moderatrix

    Puerto Rico
    Puerto Rico/Español & English
    Okay... so then I really hope nobody gets offended by my reminding everyone that --just like in the general forum-- off-topic conversation is not welcome as it creates a distraction and diverts people's attention from the original inquiry.

    I really appreciate your cooperation. :thumbsup:

    Saludos,
    LN
     
  18. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    Thanks, Laura, you are right in that it is technically off-topic, but I did not see it as "too-far-off-topic," because it was still intimately related to the happenings on this thread. It seemed somewhat artificial to start a new thread for that. However, if you prefer it that way, I have no objection and will comply.

    I did not send this as a private message because whatever answer you give me will be useful to others as well.
     
  19. RoRo_en_el_foro Senior Member

    Español Argentina
    Hola.
    Según las instrucciones de utilización del "Hydroshear", por shear se refieren a fragmentar el ADN. Hay muchas formas de fragmentarlo, ese aparato sirve para controlar el tamaño final de los fragmentos. Aparentemente en el texto, debían haber dicho antes cuál fue el proceso de fragmentación, para que el lector tenga una idea del tamaño de los fragmentos.
    Lo de la temperatura, no tiene que ver con la fragmentación, sólo dice que en ese protocolo utilizaron el ADN a 37 ºC.
     
  20. clapaucio Senior Member

    zaragoza, spain
    Spanish, Spain
    Hola a todos.

    He utilizado esa técnica a menudo en mi laboratorio por lo que puedo aclarar un poco la discusión. El término "share" aplicado al DNA hace referencia a una técnica que permite romper el DNA en pequeños fragmentos haciendo pasar repetidamente una disolución que lo contiene a través de una jeringa que lleva una fina aguja. El hecho de pasar una y otra vez la solución a través de esta aguja va fracccionando el DNA hasta obtener tamaños lo suficientemente pequeños como para permitir su uso como bloqueante de puntos inespecíficos en una membrana de hibridación.

    La traducción de "shared DNA" es por tanto "DNA fragmentado".

    Espero que esto ayude. Saludos.
     
  21. ceci Senior Member

    chile
    Gracias!!!
     
  22. sinclair001

    sinclair001 Senior Member

    Colombia/Español
    Clapaucio:
    Una pregunta:
    shared DNA ó sheared DNA?
     
  23. ceci Senior Member

    chile
    mil gracias a todos
     
  24. sergio11 Senior Member

    Los Angeles and Buenos Aires
    Spanish (lunfardo)
    "Shear" significa cortar, escindir, cizallar, y es el significado buscado en este caso. "Share" significa compartir, y no tiene nada que ver con esto.

    Saludos
     

Share This Page