1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

should - should have - would - must - have to - could - could have

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Alxmrphi, Oct 30, 2007.

  1. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Ok I have a few questions, my Italian is very patchy you see and while I can be confident in one area a much more simple area of my brain can be very patchy, so I just want to clarify I understand these things:


    I would go - Andrei - just changing the main verb into the conditional.

    I would have gone - Sarei andato - Just conjugating normal passato prossimo but putting the auxiliary in the conditional.

    I have to/must go - Devo andare - Addition of the verb 'dovere'

    I should go - Dovrei andare - This is where 'dovere' has to be put into the conditional.

    I had to go - Sono dovuto andare - Just the past version of 'have to'.

    I should have gone - Dovrei essere andato - This is where it gets confusing for me, looking at all the above and imagining what has to combine to get it right. Is it right? What needs to be done is to have the "Dovrei" again to represent "I should" like the "I should go" version, but it has to be in the past which means the infinitive isn't used (andare) but rather (andato) to express the past, and therefore because an infinitive comes after "dovere", it has to be the auxiliary 'essere'?

    I could go - Potrei andare - doesn't need explaining

    I could have gone - Potrei essere andato - This is just the other variation on using the modal verbs in the past, but replacing "dovere" with "potere" to express "could have" instead of "should have" ?

    Ok, what have I got wrong in this post?
    I was trying to remember a situation where one used the infinitive aux verb and one just used the conditional of a modal and my brain got a bit overworked, is it just using the modal verbs in the past, always means you need to use the infinitive auxiliary?

    I would appreciate it if the level of complexity didn't go beyond the level I am talking at now, not until I can post here and say I fully understand, I really don't want to confuse myself with people posting exceptions and little language nuances that are for advanced learners, not until I can say I understand the corrections I hope you can give me.
     
  2. shar1275

    shar1275 New Member

    Brooklyn, NY
    USA, English
    Ciao Alex,
    I didn't see anything wrong. The only question mark I had was for I had to go - Sono dovuto andare. Wouldn't that be dovei essere andato?
     
  3. underhouse Senior Member

     
  4. beauxyeux Senior Member

    italy
    italian italy
    Yes, in reality we prefer for "I should have gone": "sarei dovuto andare" more than "dovrei essere andato" which is the literal translation from English. It's the same with "I could have gone": "sarei potuto andare" rather than "potrei essere andato".
    For the rest your knowledge of Italian grammar is excellent!!!!
     
  5. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    It's not a question of preference. Using one structure or the other results in different meanings. This becomes obvious if we switch from first to third person:

    Sarebbe dovuto andare (he should have gone but he didn't)

    Dovrebbe essere andato (I guess that he probably went)

    Sarebbe potuto andare (he would have been able to go but he didn't)

    Potrebbe essere andato (he may have gone - I'm not sure, I'm just guessing)

    PS Alex, I know you said you didn't want anything too advanced but these are not nuances - they're actually important differences in meaning that could lead to serious misunderstandings. And by the way, you underestimate your level of proficiency. I think you are an advanced learner!:)
     
  6. fitter.happier

    fitter.happier Senior Member

    Naples, Italy
    Italian
    Just as a side note... when using the so-called "verbi servili" (dovere, potere, volere), you can use both essere and avere as auxiliaries. That is to say, sarei potuto andare = avrei potuto andare = I could have gone.
     
  7. cavillous Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Italian
    This might help to understand how to use the auxiliary

    I verbi servili si chiamano così perché "servono" il verbo all'infinito a cui sono accompagnati. La regola generale dice che l'ausiliare da usare con i verbi servili è quello richiesto dal verbo all'infinito. Dunque, per riferirci ai casi segnalati, è giusto scrivere: "Sono dovuto andare", "Non sono potuto andare", "Sarei voluto andare", "Sarebbe dovuto venire". Eccezioni. Molte grammatiche consigliano di usare l'ausiliare "avere" quando il verbo all'infinito è "essere", perciò è corretto scrivere: "Avrei dovuto essere". Infine una regola per i casi in cui il gruppo verbo servile+infinito sia accompagnato da una particella pronominale. Se la particella è unita all'infinito, l'ausiliare è sempre "avere": "A Natale ha voluto vestirsi elegantissimo". Se la particella precede il servile, l'ausiliare è sempre "essere": "A natale si è voluto vestire elegantissimo". (Giorgio de Rienzo from Corriere della sera)
     
  8. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    There is just something about the format of "sarebbe dovuto andare" or, any combination of verb and conjugation that I just can't understand "Should have... + past", it's easier with "avere" as it's less to work out for me.

    I'm just gonna keep practicing it over and over until I force it into my head by repetition, rather than understanding, it looks like it's the only way.

    Avrei dovuto cominciare ad imparare l'italiano piu' tempo fa.
    Sarei dovuto andare anche alle lezioni dell'italiano piu'.

    ?

    It seems to be ok when I write it and know the format, but off the top of my head when I'm not around any writing equipment...alarm bells.
     
  9. shar1275

    shar1275 New Member

    Brooklyn, NY
    USA, English
    Thank you, Fitter, for clarifying this. I guess it all depends on who's teaching. I've been told that with andare one is to use essere as oppose to avere. Is their something technical that I'm missing as far as using essere or avere with the verb andare, or is this only with potere, dovere, volere?
     
  10. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    I had the same doubt, someone wanna elaborate, you can use "avere" as a modal with "andare":

    Ho dovuto andare
    Abbiamo dovuto venire

    Something tells me this is wrong, but it's coming from an Italian, so I am very much confused.
     
  11. Stiannu

    Stiannu Senior Member

    Torino (Turin), Italy
    Italy, Italian
    I agree, it sounds wrong. Sono dovuto andare and Siamo dovuti venire sound much better.
    I tend to agree more with Cavillous's explanation in post number 7 than with Fitter.Happier's in post number 6. I'm not member of Accademia della Crusca, though. ;)
     
  12. beauxyeux Senior Member

    italy
    italian italy
    Thanks Giovannino for stressing these differences, sometimes we just use the language without being aware of these shifts in meaning. But now I have a question... How can we differentiate this in English?
    Thanks
     
  13. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    You can't, without saying what you did like Giovannino did, or by a gesture of unknowingness (shrugging shoulders slightly while saying it)

    All I am going to do today in work is just go over hearing those different things being said, getting to understand conditional+dovuto to mean "should have + pp" and also potere/dovere in conditional+aux-infinitive+pp
    to mean "should have" when used in the third person will mean "he/she should have done (as far as I know).

    That should do it I think!
     
  14. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Sarei dovuto andare, dovrei essere andato

    If you think about it there are different forms in English too:
    I should have gone (it was my duty but I didn't go).
    I would have had to go if you hadn't gone for me.

    However, the meanings are not the same as in the corresponding Italian constructions.
     
  15. mateintwo Senior Member

    Sweden, Former resident USA
    Giovannini wrote:
    a. Sarebbe dovuto andare (he should have gone but he didn't)

    b. Dovrebbe essere andato (I guess that he probably went)

    c. Sarebbe potuto andare (he would have been able to go but he didn't)

    d. Potrebbe essere andato (he may have gone - I'm not sure, I'm just guessing)

    Alex (I am struggling with these constructions as well),

    I try to simplify by using “avere” as auxiliary in examples a,c and which has been confirmed by some posters to be correct (at least in modern spoken Italian)
    Thus a. Avrebbe dovuto andare and c. Avrebbe potuto andare

    But I find it even simpler to use past tense of the modal verbs to express the same thing a.Doveva andare and c. Poteva andare

    Also, in exambles b and d it is quite common to express probability with future tense of “essere” so can also be said b. Sara’ andato/a and also d. Sara’ andato/a so this is another trick to avoid “twisting our heads” to hit the right expression in Italian.
     
  16. cavillous Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Italian

    1) I should have gone (it was my duty but I didn't go).
    2) I would have had to go if you hadn't gone for me.

    Come si traducono in italiano le summenzionate frasi in inglese?

    1) Sarei dovuto andare ( era mio dovere andare ma non lo feci)
    2) Se tu non fossi andato al mio posto sarei dovuto andare io.(necessità)

    Queste due frasi usano sempre "sarei dovuto andare" laddove l'inglese usa forme verbali diverse.C'è qualcosa che mi sfugge?
     
  17. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Penso che non ti sfugga nulla e che le tue due traduzioni siano perfette. "Sarei dovuto andare" può corrispondere sia a "I should have gone" che a "I would have had to go", a seconda del contesto.
    In fondo capita anche in altri casi che un'unica forma verbale italiana corrisponda a due forme non intercambiabili in inglese:

    Non devi dirglielo (assolutamente)! = You mustn't tell him

    Non devi dirglielo (necessariamente) = You don't have to tell him
     
  18. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    Ha risposto bene giovannino. E' quello che intendevo dire con "the meanings are not the same as in the corresponding Italian constructions", cioè non c'è una corrispondenza 1:1.

    Dovrei essere andato, come in ora che arrivi, dovrei essere andato/partito (e quindi probabilmente non mi troverai) si traduce sempre con:

    I should have gone by the time you arrive.
     
  19. cavillous Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Italian
    Questo punto è estremamente interessante.
    Conoscete altri casi rilevanti dove l'italiano non riesce a distinguere forme verbali diverse in inglese?

    A me viene in mente sempre riferendomi al condizionale l'incapacità dell'italiano di distinguere tra passato e futuro nelle frasi del discorso indiretto laddove nell'inglese non vi è questa ambiguità(would have/would).
    Es:
    a) He thought if he had married her they would have been very happy together.(past/regret)
    b) He was thinking if he married her they would be very happy together (pondering about the future)

    La traduzione italiana è una sola per le due frasi.
    Lui pensava che se l'avesse sposata sarebbero stati molto felici.
     
  20. ngmuipai Junior Member

    NYC
    USA, English
    Infatti, Einstein, per riferire ad un evento nel futuro, tradurrei la frase in un modo anche più vicino all'italiano: "I should be gone by the time you arrive."
     
  21. housecameron

    housecameron Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian/ Italy
    Past/regret in italiano:
    Aveva pensato/creduto che sposandola sarebbero stati molto felici (e invece così non è stato)

    Pondering about the future in italiano:
    Pensava che se l'avesse sposata sarebbero stati molto felici

    Però, parlando in prima persona, non mi sembra neanche sbagliato:
    Stavo pensando che se la sposassi saremmo molto felici. Perché?

    Off-topic, regolare, ma cosa ne pensi?
     
  22. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Non sono sicuro ma penso che

    Aveva pensato/creduto che sposandola sarebbero stati molto felici (e invece così non è stato)

    non corrisponda a

    He thought if he had married her they would have been very happy together

    Nel primo caso lui l'ha sposata e il rammarico riguarda il fatto che non sono stati felici insieme.
    Nel secondo lui si rammarica di non averla sposata perché pensa che sarebbero stati felici insieme.
     
  23. housecameron

    housecameron Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian/ Italy
    Ciao giovannino, da parte mia ho solo tentato di interpretare il "Past/regret" & "Pondering about the future" in italiano.
    Non mi pronuncio sull'inglese.
    :)
     
  24. ngmuipai Junior Member

    NYC
    USA, English
    Hai ragione, giovannino; tradurrei la frase di housecameron così:
    "Aveva pensato/creduto che sposandola sarebbero stati molto felici."
    "He had thought that if he married her they would be very happy."
    Il trapassato stabilisce che aveva quell'opinione prima del matrimonio e non dopo; il gerundio non funziona bene in inglese in questo caso; il condizionale passato indica il futuro nel passato che, in inglese, richiede il condizionale presente.
     
  25. Panpan

    Panpan Senior Member

    Sawbridgeworth, UK
    England, English
    The explanation that Michel Thomas gives in his tuition tapes is that you use essere as auxiliary with all 'coming and going' verbs; andare, venire, partire, salire, morire etc., and you use avere with all other verbs.
     
  26. cavillous Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Italian
    Per evitare ogni tipo di confusione avevo sottolineato che l'ambiguità nel distinguere tra passato e futuro riguarda solo il discorso indiretto.
    Per essere più chiaro vi propongo un esercizio da scuola secondaria.
    Trasforma le seguenti frasi ipotetiche da discorso diretto a discorso indiretto.

    Luigi pensava:"Se l'avessi sposata saremmo stati molto felici".
    Luigi pensava:"Se la sposassi saremmo molto felici".

    Riaffermo con più determinazione che l'unica versione indiretta che rispetti la natura ipotetica e le posizioni dei pronomi delle due frasi è la seguente.

    Luigi pensava che se l'avesse sposata sarebbero stati molto felici.

    Immaginiamo frasi ipotetiche che nel discorso diretto suonino così(alcune sono grammaticalmente dubbie ma sono tipiche del parlato)

    A) "Se avrò tempo andrò in vacanza"
    B) "Se avessi tempo andrei in vacanza"
    C) "Se avessi avuto tempo andrei in vacanza"
    D) "Se avessi tempo sarei andato in vacanza"
    E) "Se avevo tempo andavo in vacanza"
    D) "Se avessi avuto tempo sarei andato in vacanza"

    In un discorso indiretto (introdotto da un verbo con valore passato: ha detto che, ha risposto che ecc.) tutte queste forma ipotetiche si riducono a quella che è formulata alla lettera D.
    Quindi nel discorso indiretto abbiamo questa unica possibilità:

    "Lui ha detto che se avesse avuto tempo sarebbe andato in vacanza".

    Frase che presa isolata da ogni contesto contiene un'ambiguità temporale perchè senza altre specificazioni temporali non si riesce a capire se lui sia realmente andato in vacanza oppure no.Questa ambiguità non sussiste nel discorso diretto dove siamo liberi di usare il condizionale presente o passato mentre nel discorso indiretto siamo confinati all'uso del condizionale passato laddove in inglese l'uso di would have...per il passato e di would...per il futuro nel passato dirime ogni dubbio.
     
  27. ngmuipai Junior Member

    NYC
    USA, English
    Vi ringrazio Cavillous, Housecameron ed altri madrelingue le lezioni dettagliate di grammatica...ma c'e ancora una questione. Sembra che ci sia un consenso in favore dell'uso di essere come ausiliare con dovere, volere e potere + un verbo intransitivo, ma avevo l'impressione che si potesse usare o avere o essere in quei casi, per esprimere significati leggermente diversi:
    "Ho dovuto andare" per riferire ad un impegno esterno; "sono dovuto andare" per parlare di un sentimento interno.

    Giusto, secondo voi?
     
  28. cavillous Senior Member

    Switzerland
    Italian
    Nella lingua parlata puoi usare entrambi come fa la maggior parte degli italiani.Non penso che l'uso di avere piuttosto che essere veicoli
    sfumature di significato diverse.
    Per quanto riguarda l'italiano scritto dovresti attenerti alla seguente regola:
    Se scegli l'ausiliare del verbo retto dal servile, non sbaglierai mai: es. "Ha dovuto mangiare" (come "ha mangiato"); "è dovuto partire" (come "è partito").
    Per ulteriori regole sui verbi servili ti rimando all'Accademia della Crusca
     
  29. renminds

    renminds Senior Member

    Puglia - Italy
    Italian - Italy
    This is a long thread, maybe a little off topic.

    Let me say something that could help Alex.

    Your confusion about "I should have gone" and "I could have gone" comes from a simple difference: in English "have" is the only auxiliary verb for the active form and "be" is used in the passive form while in Italian we use both the auxiliary verbs in active form depending on the transitive / intransitive nature of the verb.

    cavillous is right, in Italian the use of the auxiliary verb depends on the verb the auxiliary verb supports, no matter which the servile verb is.

    The verb "andare" (to go) is supported by "essere" (to be) so the exact translations of the previous sentences are:
    - "Sarei dovuto andare" for "I should have gone"
    - "Sarei potuto andare" for "I could have gone"
    but e.g. "cantare (to sing) is supported by "avere" (to have) so:
    - "Avrei dovuto cantare" for "I should have sung"

    The following sentences are not wrong:
    - Dovrei essere andato
    - Potrei essere andato
    but you should understand another difference: the translation can change according to the context.

    Example: "I had gone"
    - "ero andato", like in "I had gone to Bob's party." -> "Ero andato alla festa di Bob."
    but
    - "fossi andato" in conditional sentences: "If I had gone to the party, I would have found my friends." -> "Se fossi andato alla festa, avrei trovato i miei amici."

    So you must use the first (exact) translation at least when you translate the conditional sentences but you can use both the translations in other contexts. I think that the second (not wrong) translation is used in Italian to emphasize the must/need (dovere) and the ability (potere) in a possibly-way (created by the conditional) like giovannino said in post #5, which is what you naturally do putting "should" and "could" in place of "would".

    At this point, literally different translations could be:

    "Sarei dovuto andare" for "I would have had to go"
    "Sarei potuto andare" for "I would have been able to go"
    "Dovrei essere andato" for "I should have gone"
    "Potrei essere andato" for "I could have gone"

    I hope this can help you.

    Bye,
    Renminds
     
  30. jamiel Junior Member

    English, United Kingdom
    Ciao a tutti,

    I am having difficulty with knowing when the sentence is translated using "should" or "could" in the present conditional tense.

    For example in my exercises I have the following sentence:

    Comperei molto pane.

    How would one know if the speaker means he should buy lots of bread or would by lots of bread, and what is the translation for "I should buy lot's of bread" ?

    Another example is :

    Vedresti tutti i tuoi amici e parenti

    I answered "You could see your friends and relatives", but the correct answer was "You would see your friends and relatives"

    Grazie in anticipo.

    Jamie
     
  31. TheClash87

    TheClash87 New Member

    Lombardy
    Italian
    Heya,
    actually I had to go means dovevo andare while I have had to go means sono dovuto andare.
     
  32. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    jamiel...

    Comprerei = I would buy
    Dovrei comprare = I should buy

    Vedresti = You would see
    Potresti vedere = You could see

    You use 'dovere' and 'potere' in the conditional to translate 'should' and 'could', otherwise it is just 'would + verb'.
     
  33. beccamutt

    beccamutt Senior Member

    New Jersey, USA
    English - US
    Comprerei pane = I would buy bread
    Dovrei comprare pane = I should buy bread
    Potrei comprare pane = I could buy bread

    Hope that helps :)
     
  34. TheClash87

    TheClash87 New Member

    Lombardy
    Italian
    It means he\she would buy lots of bread.
    In fact, the translation of your sentence is "Dovrei comprare molto pane"

    Your answer means "Potresti vedere i tuoi amici e parenti".
    You use would when you just have the conditional (tu vedresti,io vedrei etc).
    Instead, could is the conditional of potere (even when you mean saper fare: I could swim if he taught me/ Potrei nuotare se me lo insegnasse)
    Finally, should is the conditional of dovere.
     
  35. Luca84 New Member

    italian
    Salve a tutti,
    ho letto i vari post ma non ho ancora le idee del tutto chiare:confused:. La frase "She should have called him" per esempio corrisponde a:
    1) Avrebbe dovuto chiamarlo (e non l'ha fatto)
    2) Dovrebbe averlo chiamato (ma non ne sono sicuro)
    3) Sia 1) che 2) dipende dal contesto

    Tick the correct answer:)
     
  36. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
     
  37. Murphy

    Murphy Senior Member

    Sicily, Italy
    English, UK
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2010

Share This Page