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si no obligarse + subj

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by melissinda, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. melissinda Senior Member

    Philadelphia, Pa
    USA, english
    Una preguna - ¿es verdad que se usa el subjuntivo en la situación a continuación?

    Mejorarás mucho más que si no te obligues practicarlo.

    You will improve much more than if you didn't make yourself practice it.

    Si es verdad que sí se usa, ¿por qué?

    Or - would it be better said

    ... si no te obligaras practicarlo.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2013
  2. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Hello, Melissinda.

    The present subjunctive (in this case obligues) cannot be used after a conditional si. That than if there confuses me anyway.:eek:

    I'd say, for example (quite literally): Mejorarás (mucho más) si no lo practicas/si no haces por practicarlo/si no te obligas a practicarlo. Mejorarías (mucho más) si no lo practicaras/si no te obligaras a ...

    Saludos.
     
  3. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    The problem is, the sentence is English is incorrect. There's no verb tense agreement. If you use "will" in the first clause, you can't use past tense in the second clause, you must use present:

    "You will improve much more than if you don't make yourself practice it." -

    In that case, in Spanish you put the verbs or both clauses in indicative.

    "(Practicando)...Mejorarás mucho más que si no te obligas a practicarlo"

    However, if in English you use "would" in the same clause, the verb in the second clause has to be in the past tense (which is actually the English subjunctive):

    "You would improve much more than if you didn't make yourself practice it." -

    The first verb in Spanish must be in the conditional and the second verb must to be in the imperfect subjunctive:

    "....mejorarías mucho más que si no te obligaras a practicarlo"

    In any case it's a strange sentence and it would be much better to say "Mejorarás mucho más si te obligas a practicarlo" (presente)

    "Mejorarías mucho más si te obligaras a practicarlo" (subjuntivo)

    :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2013
  4. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Thank you, Micafe.

    Sure, I agree about the tense agreement in Spanish, but I still don't fully understand the original sentence ...
     
  5. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    "Al practicar/practicando vas a mejorar más que si no practicas" (hence the use of "than" in the sentence in English)

    Your examples are stating the opposite. They are saying that '"vas a mejorar si no practicas"

    ¿Do you get it now? :)

    Saluditos y saludotes :D
     
  6. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    You know I'm not very bright ...;) But the fact is that I've been trying for Melissinda to clarify the meaning of the original sentence and confirm that it's correct or tell us what he/she wants to express.

    Gracias otra vez. Un saludito, Micafe.
     
  7. micafe

    micafe Senior Member

    United States
    Spanish - Colombia
    And I was trying to explain to you what I understood the sentence was about..:D- "Do you get it now" wasn't said to be critical . It's just the problem with Internet, you can't hear the intonation.. :eek:

    Of course you're very bright.. but that's another story. I just replied to your PM.

    Un saludito para ti, Blasita.. :)
     
  8. juan082937 Senior Member

    español
    Mejorarías/mejorarás mucho más, si no te presionas a practicarlo.

    Personal pressure is the key idea in the if clause.
     
  9. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Muchas gracias por todo, Micafe. Un saludo.:)
    Hola, Juan. O sea que a ti te parece bien la oración original (You will improve much more than if you didn't make yourself practice it) y la interpretas como dices aquí, ¿verdad?

    Lo de 'no te presionas a practicarlo' no es algo que yo diría de manera natural, pero supongo que será simplemente una diferencia regional.

    Saludos.
     
  10. juan082937 Senior Member

    español
    Lo que impide aprender más es la presión que ejerces sobre ti mismo a practicarlo
     
  11. melissinda Senior Member

    Philadelphia, Pa
    USA, english
    Muchas gracias a todos por la ayuda. Aquí Tienen el sentido original

    Person a: I am going to make a contract to only speak Spanish
    Person b: you will do great and you will improve much more than if you did not force yourself to do this.

    I am not an expert in English (or Spanish) grammar but I do believe this is correctly said in English... At least acceptably said. concern was over the translation of the meaning into Spanish, is it subjunctive (past or present) or indicative. In English starting with the conditional seems contrary to the original intent, but is that best in Spanish?

    "Mejorarías mucho más que si no te obligaras practicar."

    Les agradezco la ayuda

    Added:
    After reading the posts more specifically you are correct the second portion SHOULD be in present tense not past.

    You will improve more this way than if you don't make yourself practice.

    Therefor the entire sentence is indicative in Spanish. Yes?
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2013
  12. blasita

    blasita Senior Member

    Spanish - Spain (Madrid)
    Thank you, Melissinda.

    Micafe was right. Yes, if you use 'will improve' and 'don't make', then (literally): Mejorarás mucho más que si no te obligas a practicarlo.
     

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