sich treffen mit jemandem / jemanden treffen

Discussion in 'Deutsch (German)' started by popotla, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. popotla Senior Member

    British English
    I have trouble knowing how to use this verb (in the sense of "meet").

    Are the following correct?

    1.Treffen wir uns morgen? (Are we meeting tomorrow?)

    2.Sollen/können wir uns morgen treffen? (Should we/can we meet tomorrow?)

    3. Wir haben uns im Restaurant getroffen, dann sind wir zum Bahnhof gegangen, um mit meiner Sohn/um meinen Sohn zu treffen.

    4. Ich wollte mit ihr treffen.

    5. Ich wollte sie treffen.

    6. Wann können wir uns treffen?

    Are the variations in #3 and the difference between 4 and 5, just different ways of saying the same thing?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Liam Lew's Senior Member

    All sentences except for the fourth and the last part of the third are correct.
    It should read:
    3. Wir haben uns im Restaurant getroffen, dann sind wir zum Banhof gegangen, ums uns mit meinem Sohn/um meinen Sohn zu treffen.

    4. Ich wollte mich mit ihr treffen.

    In your third sentence the meanings are the same. But the reflexive use tells us about both partys. It says that there is an intention on both sides. The non-reflexive use just talks about one party.

    The fourth and the fifth sentence mean the same.

    So as you see, you have to distinguish between reflexive and non-reflexive.
     
  3. popotla Senior Member

    British English
    Thanks, Liam Lew's.

    4. Ich wollte mich mit ihr treffen. ......... the reflexive use tells us about both partys. It says that there is an intention on both sides. But is there, here, "an intention on both sides"? Someone is saying that he/she wants to meet "her". We don't know anything, do we, about her intention (the intention of the person the speaker would like to meet).

    5. Ich wollte sie treffen. The fourth and the fifth sentence mean the same. But here again, in the fifth, the person is just stating his wish.

    So is it a rule that with mit + dative, the reflexive form is used but with the accusative (e.g. ihn), the reflexive isn't used?

    Still, I don't understand the distinction between reflexive/non-reflexive as showing intention on both sides/intentions on one side only.
     
  4. berndf Moderator

    Geneva
    German (Germany)
    The reflexive form is symmetrical (wir trafen uns = we met; both of us are agent and patent of the action), the transitive form is asymmetrical (ich traf ihn = I met him; I=agent and him=patient).
     
  5. Gwunderi Senior Member

    German (CH) / Italian - bilingual
    It's the same as in English.
    4. Ich wollte mich mit ihr treffen = I wanted to meet with her
    5. Ich wollte sie treffen = I wanted to meet her.

    The meaning is not exactly the same. In the first case, both should be willing to see each other (intention on both sides). In the second case, the intention/willingness can be one-sided; as you say: the person is just stating a wish.

    Yes, that's correct.
     
  6. Liam Lew's Senior Member

    I would say there can be exceptions sometimes:
    Sometimes the reflexive use of treffen in the first person can imply intention only on one side(very rarely). But that depends on context. Generally the reflexive use of the word "treffen" always implies intention/wish/willingness on both sides and is always symmetrical.
     
  7. popotla Senior Member

    British English
    Thanks for replies.
     

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