Since...to date

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Marsu_BZH, May 2, 2009.

  1. Marsu_BZH New Member

    Brisbane (Australia)
    Francais - France
    Hi there,

    Where "to date" should placed in a sentence begining with "Since": right after "Since" or elsewhere? My specific case is the following:
    "Since the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health are largely unknown to date, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge."
    OR
    " Since to date the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health are largely unknown, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge.
    Many thanks.
     
  2. jpredman123 Senior Member

    England-English
    Since the long term effectS of these compounds on the environment and human health are, to date, largely unknown, advanced...
     
  3. Joelline

    Joelline Senior Member

    USA (W. Pennsylvania)
    American English
    Hi,

    I agree with jpredman's suggestion; however, your first example would also work (with a comma added for clarity):

    "Since the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health are largely unknown, to date, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge."
     
  4. Brand Junior Member

    Ville de Québec
    English - Canadian
    I believe it would also work to say
    "Since, to date, the long term effect . . . "
     
  5. lovely_idiot New Member

    Singapore
    Vietnamese
    Sorry but this is new to me :) I've tried to look up for it in some dictionaries including idioms but nothing has been found yet.
    Can anyone explain for me what "since <--> something, to date, " means? Perhaps, rephrase the example if possible :D
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2009
  6. Marsu_BZH New Member

    Brisbane (Australia)
    Francais - France
    Thanks everyone.
     
  7. kalamazoo Senior Member

    US, English
    I think both the original sentences are okay and the added commas are not really needed. I would prefer the second version though (saying "Since to date the long term effects are unknown..").
     
  8. lovely_idiot New Member

    Singapore
    Vietnamese
    Oh, I'm sorry for that bad kind of writing :) I actually meant :"Since something, to date, ...". I got it from the first example of "since...to date" in this topic.

    Perhaps, you can help me rephrase it without using "since... to date"?
    "Since the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health are largely unknown, to date, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge."

    Thank you :)
     
  9. Floyd 33

    Floyd 33 Junior Member

    English - Canada
    A way to rephrase that sentence without using "since... to date" would be something like:

    Because the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health are largely unknown at this point, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge.

    "since" is used as a synonym for "because", or at least that's how I use it, and "to date" would be meaning up to right now, and is usually used in the context of a developing story or scientific advancement, where a full answer isn't known at the moment.
     
  10. losilmer

    losilmer Senior Member

    "Since the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health are largely unknown to date, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge."
    Here "since" means "Due to the fact that, because of, being so that".
    But in
    "Since to date the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health are largely unknown, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge."
    saying "Since to date" is confusing, because "since" also means "from a certain time" and together with "to date" can be misinterpreted with "since today".
    This is my opinion. So, the first sentence is more clearly written.
     
  11. kalamazoo Senior Member

    US, English
    There is no way that "since to date" could mean "since today" but it would probably be clearer to say "Because" instead of "since" anyway.
     
  12. johndot Senior Member

    English - England
    The thing that puzzles me is: “Since the long term effect [...] are largely unknown [... ]. Strange, that!
     
  13. losilmer

    losilmer Senior Member

    johndot, you are right. The verb should be in singular, as per concord rules, and it has to be
    "Since the long term effect of these compounds on the environment and human health is largely unknown to date, advanced treatment of wastewater is envisaged to reduce their discharge."
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2009

Share This Page