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Slang terms for beer

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by albondiga, May 25, 2007.

  1. albondiga Senior Member

    Brazil
    English/USA
    Hi all,

    I'm interested to know what slang terms are used to refer to beer in different languages.

    In English, I like the simple "a cold one," and I think "brewski" has a nice ring to it... (note: I'm American, and I do wonder how much the slang terms for this beverage differ throughout the English-speaking world.)

    However, my favorite term in any language is the Portuguese "loira gelada" or "loura gelada"; literally, a "frozen blonde" (or "icy blonde" if you prefer :))... [I've only encountered it in Portuguese, but I wonder whether a comparable term exists in other Romance languages.]

    Anyway, what other slang terms exist for beer in other languages?
     
  2. dn88 Senior Member

    pl
    Hello,

    In Poland beer is usually called "browar" (Polish word for "brewery") or more informally "browiec". I've also read that sometimes it is referred to as "chmiel" (Polish word for "hops"), but I don't think it's commonly used.

    dn88
     
  3. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    The latter one looks like of Polish origin. :)
    To those given by dn88, I'm adding bro.
    I've never heard chmiel, though.


    Tom
     
  4. sarcie Senior Member

    Munich
    English - Ireland
    In English (IRL), a pint is synonymous with a pint of beer or Guinness. In certain parts of South Dublin, the term "Britney" is used quite a lot (rhyming slang -> Britney Spears = Beers).

    In France, you occasionally refer to the type of beer you're drinking - a "blonde" is a light-colored lager, a "rousse" is a reddish-color beer.

    Here in Munich, there are terms to refer to beer mixes, but it's not really slang terms for beer - for example, lager mixed with lemonade is a Radler (cyclist), wheat beer mixed with lemonade is a Russ'n (Russian), etc.
     
  5. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    More French: une mousse ("a foam") [not very common, I believe]
     
  6. Mariamar Junior Member

    Algarve
    Portugal, Portuguese
    Hello,

    In Portuguese (Europe) we also say bejeca, jola when we are speaking with friends about beer:
    Vou beber uma bejeca (it seems it is a diminutive cerveja-cervejeca-bejeca)
    on the other hand, jola is is the contrary cerveja-cervejola.
     
  7. TraductoraPobleSec

    TraductoraPobleSec Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Catalan & Spanish
    In both Catalan and Spanish we adopt the Italian term to refer to beer when you're among friends: BIRRA.

    - Anem a fer unes birres / birretes. (Catalan)
    - Vamos a tomar unas birras / birrillas. (Spanish)
     
  8. elpoderoso

    elpoderoso Senior Member

    English
    In England you would usually say ''I'm going to have a pint'' because beer is usually drank in pints.I can't for the life of me think of any slang terms for beer at this moment other than that Guinness is referred to as ''The Black Stuff''.
     
  9. Eáránë Junior Member

    Belgium, Dutch (Flemish)
    In West-Flemish (= Belgian dialect) we say "een pint(e)", which looks like the English word 'pint', but is pronounced differently. It rhymes with 'hint'.

    Toodles
    Eáránë
     
  10. Joannes Senior Member

    Antwerp
    Belgian Dutch
    But that's not slang, is it? I would even say it's Standard (Belgian?) Dutch. :) (The probably even more standard variant would be pils.)

    I'm not under the impression that we use slang terms for 'beer' very often. I have heard - and used - vriend 'friend', but I couldn't imagine it to be widely distributed.

    Another word that is quite common to my impression is a glazen boterham(meke) 'glass sandwich', which you can say to have gegeten 'eaten' rather than drunk. It would be used only (or rather) in specific contexts, though.

    There is a word for 'beer' with a rather distinguished edge to it: gerstenat 'barley liquid'. (Nat is usually used as an adjective meaning 'wet', its use as a substantive 'liquid' is very marginal.) Although you may find this in certain invitations or advertisings, it is also used ironically in descriptions of otherwise nasty, drunken scenes. :D
     
  11. Aurin

    Aurin Senior Member

    España
    Alemania (alemán)
    Edit: Also we have Gerstensaft (barley juice, amber nectar).
    In German we also have "ein kühles Blondes" = a cool blonde
     
  12. DCPaco Senior Member

    Planet Earth
    Spanish of Mexico/ English of the USA
    In Mexico, these are some of the ones I know of:

    cheves, chelas, helodias, cebadas, birongas, espumosas, güeras
     
  13. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Yes, but that one is more used among adults. In teen slang, we sometimes say Alk (short for Alkohol) for any kind of beer. I can't remember any other slang term for beer, except maybe ein Bierchen (= a little beer).
     
  14. altan New Member

    Turkey, Turkish
    In Turkish, the most common is

    Arpa Suyu
     
  15. tom_in_bahia Senior Member

    Teixeira de Freitas, BA, Brasil
    South Florida/Phoenix-Tucson/the Adirondacks. Native of North American English
    They do the same in Brazil: cervejinha. Another one from Brazil I associate with "a cold one" in English is "uma gelada" (which could just be a shortened version of "loira gelada"). I know that when you are going to go out for beer in Brazil, you may say, "vou comer água" (lit.: I'm going to eat water).

    Another one from English - though it seems a little out-dated - is "suds" and a pejorative for bad/warm beer is "piss water". A generic euphamism for alcohol in English (frequently used for beer) can be "liquid courage" insinuating the loss of social inhibitions that can occur after drinking an alcoholic beverage.

    I think it's also interesting that in areas with a large Spanish-speaking populations in the US, like Arizona, California or South Florida, many English speakers will say "cerveza" in social situations with other English speakers (noting that this wouldn't be English to Spanish code-switching because the speaker who says it, nor the listener, doesn't need to have any real knowledge of the Spanish language - consider, words that are understood by English speakers like loco, gringo, agua, dinero, etc.).
     
  16. doman

    doman Junior Member

    Vietnam
    Vietnam, Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
    Ordering beer in Vietnamese:

    -một vại / a jar ( ìn fact, vại is a glass )
    -một lon ba-ba-ba / a can of beer
    -một bia hơi / pneumatic beer / (in fact, a draught beer)
     
  17. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,

    I have no idea what is meant by 'slang', but anyway:

    Also in Dutch:
    - dagschotel (plat du jour).
    - Joe Piler (this was popular a few years ago. It's actually the name of a popular brand which got pronounced in a kind of fake English way).

    Frank
     
  18. Liiisa New Member

    Sweden
    Sweden, Swedish
    Swedish: Bira or Bärs.
     
  19. Mariaguadalupe

    Mariaguadalupe Senior Member

    Mexico
    Mexico, Spanish-English

    indio muerto (in reference to the name of the beer and that it has to be really cold)
     
  20. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    But bira is not a slang term, is it? Isn't that the standard word for beer?
     
  21. Cannister7 Senior Member

    English, England
    Some more from England which I can't say I use, but have heard at least;

    a jar - 'fancy a jar?' probably referring to the pint glass
    a bevvie - from beverage, think I heard it on Brookside the Liverpudlian soap opera so it must be real!

    oh and in Panama they say 'pinta', from the English 'pint' even though it's usually served in cans or bottles, and nowhere near the same volume.
     
  22. Chazzwozzer

    Chazzwozzer Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Well, I don't think we have a slang word for beer, it's just bira. Arpa suyu for bira must be an informal term, not slang.
     
  23. Abbassupreme

    Abbassupreme Senior Member

    California, U.S.
    United States, English, Persian
    In Iranian Persian:
    "Araq", which literally translates to "sweat". I forgot how to spell it correctly, though, so I'm not sure if it would be transliterated at as "aragh" or "araq". There you are, in any case, though. :D
     
  24. Frank06

    Frank06 Senior Member

    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    Araq = beer??? Interesting.
    I thought عرق was a strong alcoholic drink (homemade in Iran, between 40 and ??°, smells like the kind of liquid to boost the fire on a barbeque).

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     
  25. Abbassupreme

    Abbassupreme Senior Member

    California, U.S.
    United States, English, Persian
    I really don't know. My father uses "araq" ('araq) as a slang term for "alcoholic beverage" all the time, and I'm sure I've heard his friends use the term, as well. Mind you, he's from central Tehran, were slang is apparently used abundantly, just like London's Cockney. I could totally be wrong about this, though. Any fellow Iranians wanna come help me out? :D
     
  26. Abbassupreme

    Abbassupreme Senior Member

    California, U.S.
    United States, English, Persian
    Normally, beer is just called "âbe joh" ("barley water").
     
  27. Staarkali

    Staarkali Senior Member

    In French, une mousse (lit. foam) is quite common. Low educated people will also say une binouze (for beer), a free variation of de la bibine (wine)
     
  28. albondiga Senior Member

    Brazil
    English/USA
    Thanks, everyone!

    (PS: Maybe "colloquial" would have been a better word to use than "slang"... still, I think most people got the point of what I was asking...)
     
  29. abba5 Junior Member

    Swedish
    To Whodunit: the normal word in Swedish for beer is öl, so bira and bärs are slang words, probably inspired by german, english or french.

    (Note for those who think all nordic languages are very similar: don't go to a Norwegian bar and ask for a bärs, since in Norway it means poo...)

    Another common expression is en stor stark (one big strong), referring to a glass of 40 cl (big) with draft (lager) beer of around 5-6 degrees of alcohol (strong), which is the standard beer served in pubs and restaurants.
     
  30. MarianoFD New Member

    Spanish Argentina
    Im from Argentina, and I can tell you that the same term was adopted here :)
     
  31. catlady60

    catlady60 Senior Member

    Pennsylvania (20mi/36km from the Poconos
    English-US (New York City)
    I'm surprised no English speaker mentioned suds.
     
  32. rusita preciosa

    rusita preciosa Modus forendi

    USA (Φιλαδέλφεια)
    Russian (Moscow)
    In Russian beer is пиво /pivo/
    Slang words are:
    пивко /pivko/ - adding a suffix of endearment (a similar word would be somethinmg like "beery" in English)
    пивасик /pivasik/ - sort of baby-talk - I only heard this word used to imitate the speech of uneducated / lower social class people.
     
  33. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    Beer is «μπύρα» or «μπίρα» (both spellings are pronounced as /'bira/) a feminine noun, calqued from the Italian word for the beverage, birra. The word with the ypsilon is earlier.
    Ale is «ζύθος» ('ziθos, m.) an ancient masculine noun «ζῦτος» ('zūtŏs) and «ζῦθος» ('zūtʰŏs) with obscure etymology (probably an early ancient Egyptian loan word).
    In slang:
    «Μπιρόνι» (bi'roni, n.) and in plural, «μπιρόνια» (bi'roɲa).
    The fan of excessive beer drinking is referred to as «μπιροκλής» (biro'klis, m.) from «μπίρα» and the mythical hero «Ηρακλής» (Heracles).
     
  34. Nonstar

    Nonstar Senior Member

    the outskirts of inner pantyhoses
    In-love-with-the-coming-race Portuguese
    In addition to what the others said about beer in Brazil, I also know acervaijanas and barriguda bem morta.
    Acervaijanas = azerbaijanas (Azerbaijan women+cerva = short for cerveja) :D class!
    Barriguda bem morta = barriguda the bottle looks like a pot-bellied person, and bem morta = dead cold.
    Also breja.
     
  35. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    In Tagalog: Inuming mabula'
     
  36. Jabir

    Jabir Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    Well, we have "cerva" in Portuguese also.
    For "cachaça", a Brazilian alcoholic drink, we have the "marvada" which means "bad girl"...
     
  37. Nonstar

    Nonstar Senior Member

    the outskirts of inner pantyhoses
    In-love-with-the-coming-race Portuguese
    :D :D
     
  38. Jabir

    Jabir Senior Member

    Portuguese - Brazil
    Lol, Nonstar, that was a very funny expression I haven't heard from a long time, but my brother said it yesterday... maybe he's mixing a lot with the Sertanejo folks out there
     
  39. Frank78

    Frank78 Senior Member

    Saxony-Anhalt
    German
    ein kühles Blondes = a cold blonde (one) ; obviously only for pale beers
    ein Hopfenblütentee = a hop blossom tea
    eine Hopfenkaltschale = a cold hop soup; Kaltschale is normally a dessert
     
  40. NewtonCircus Senior Member

    Singapore
    Dutch (Belgium)
    IMHO both words do not only look similar but are technically speaking one and the same or at least have the same origin.

    A pint is in fact a measure which equals to 568 ml, at least for an imperial pint. The Americans seem to have introduced some profitability measures and reduced the US pint to 473 ml. Our economist were apparently trained in the US and reduced our very own pint bier to 250 ml. That's I guess the reason why everyone calls it pintje, unless you cross the Belgian/Dutch border were you get double the amount, that is 500 ml of the same liquid.

    Now, how hard can that be :D.
     
  41. NewtonCircus Senior Member

    Singapore
    Dutch (Belgium)
    IMHO both words do not only look similar but are technically speaking one and the same or at least have the same origin.

    A pint is in fact a measure which equals to 568 ml, at least for an imperial pint. The Americans seem to have introduced some profitability measures and reduced the US pint to 473 ml. Our economist were apparently trained in the US and reduced our very own pint bier to 250 ml. That's I guess the reason why everyone calls it pintje, unless you cross the Belgian/Dutch border were you get double the amount, that is 500 ml of the same liquid.

    Now, how hard can that be :D.
     
  42. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Hungarian söricilin [sör beer + -icilin like penicillin]
     
  43. Youngfun

    Youngfun Senior Member

    Pekino, Ĉinujo
    Chinese/Italian - bilingual
    In Italian most beers are lagers, so it's called bionda (blonde).
    Peroni has made many ads with the slogan "La tua bionda naturale" (Your natural blonde), with gorgeous blonde girls as testimonials.
    As in France, when ordering beer you specify the color: chiara (light), rossa (red), scura (dark).

    In China there's no slang for beer. But the most famous beer "Tsingdao" - in Chinese: 青岛啤酒 Qingdao Pijiu - is usually shortened to 青啤 Qing pi.
     
  44. AquisM Senior Member

    Hong Kong
    English/Cantonese
    啤酒 is Chinese for beer, and is pronounced in Cantonese as be zau. In Hong Kong it's common to say 啤啤佢 (be be keoi) for (Let's) have a beer.
     
  45. Nonstar

    Nonstar Senior Member

    the outskirts of inner pantyhoses
    In-love-with-the-coming-race Portuguese
    You have a point there! We say "Be be o ke(oi)?", people say "Be be cerveja!". :D
     
  46. Youngfun

    Youngfun Senior Member

    Pekino, Ĉinujo
    Chinese/Italian - bilingual
    Doesn't 佢 mean "he"? :confused:
    I think I heard people pronouncing be jau. The Cantonese z sounds very much like j for us.

    :D
     
  47. djmc Senior Member

    France
    English - United Kingdom
    In England at least one can distinguish between bitter and mild, e.g. "A pint of mild please". One might specify the type "A pint of Boddingtons". At one time in the south of England, bitter was normally drunk, but mild (M and B) was more normal in the Midlands. In Scotland one would ask for a pint of heavy. In London where bitter is the normal beer, often there is best beer, and then another which is weaker. I had a friend at college who used to say "A pint of wallop", meaning weak bitter.
     
  48. OneStroke Senior Member

    Hong Kong, China
    Chinese - Cantonese (HK)
    Yes, but it also means 'it'. When you say 'darn it!', you don't have any holes in your socks. :p
     
  49. Halfdan Junior Member

    Canadian English
    öl is the standard Swedish word for beer.
     
  50. gwenboulet Senior Member

    London
    French - France
    In French we also say "demi". In context "je vais prendre un demi" refers to a half "chopine", the chopine being an old unit for beer which was about the same quantity as a pint. So demi = half a chopine = a quarter of a pint. :)
     

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