sleep like a baby

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by phillyitalianstudent, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. phillyitalianstudent Senior Member

    Philadelphia
    English, U.S.A.
    Is there an Italian expression that is equivalent to the English one: "sleep like a baby"

    I want to say this about someone who went to bed after a long, hard day of work: "(last night) he slept like a baby"
     
  2. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    Hi philly,

    Wait for native speakers of course, but you can say

    dormire come un bambino

    So, ha dormito come un bambino
     
  3. Alec71 Senior Member

    Turin - Italy
    Italian
    Yes I think you can translate it literally meaning a restoring and peaceful sleep (Ha dormito come un bimbo, pupo...)
     
  4. venerabilejorge Senior Member

    roma
    italy - italian
    Potresti anche dire, "dormire come un angioletto".
     
  5. Tellure

    Tellure Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    :thumbsup:
     
  6. Alec71 Senior Member

    Turin - Italy
    Italian
    Allora "sleep like an angel"? ;)
     
  7. venerabilejorge Senior Member

    roma
    italy - italian
    Be, Alec, spesso e volentieri bimbo/neonato e angioletto sono, diciamo, sinonimi!
     
  8. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    I like "dormire come un angioletto", I really do :), but I think the meaning in English is that not that you sleep innocently or in an innocent frame of mind, but that you sleep in an untroubled way, with no disturbing thoughts. Can the two be synonymous? Alec's suggestion of "dormire come un bimbo" would appear to be closer to the original. :)
     
  9. phillyitalianstudent Senior Member

    Philadelphia
    English, U.S.A.
    Thanks everyone for your replies. In regards to elfa's question, perhaps they are the same thing if babies have undisturbed consciences, as do angels whose intelligence is in perfect conformity with divine will?
     
  10. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    Your call, phllly... ;)
     
  11. Alec71 Senior Member

    Turin - Italy
    Italian
    ...or like a log because when someone is really tired and completely asleep is also as still .... ops... inanimate as a... log... ;)

    I think that anything depends on the context. I can even sound a bit more ironic if I say "Look at the boss .. always shouting at us and now sleeping like a baby at his desk" Would he really seem like an angel/baby?
     
  12. fran06

    fran06 Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian Italy
    "Dormire come un angioletto" is more common but you can use either one, they are both perfect translation for "sleep like a baby".
     
  13. elfa

    elfa Senior Member

    Bath, England
    English
    Sleeping like a log is different to sleeping like a baby. "Like a log" indicates that it's a heavy dreamless sleep.

    Going with the analogy of the boss, (and to illustrate IMO the difference between a baby and a little angel ;)) I don't think anyone would say

    Look at the boss...sleeping like an angel at his desk
    even though the metaphor "to sleep like an angel" is perfectly valid in English. Just my opinion :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2011
  14. Alec71 Senior Member

    Turin - Italy
    Italian
    Hi Elfa! As I said (and you confirmed it) I'd rather use bimbo/pupo with baby and angelo/angioletto with angel since there are definite idioms in both English and Italian with these 2 nous (even though I can't see so much difference between them). For their use... I have to repeat myself... it depends on the context. For instance if I would make the scene a bit more ridiculous, I'd exaggerate the use of the idiom and a "bossy boss" could be described as "un bimbo/pupetto/angelo che dorme" after all that chiding instead of a "ghiro". Just my view and as usual, thanks for your aways precious opinions.
    One more thing... what does IMO stand for (please forgive my ignorance)?
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011

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