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Slovak: semivowel

Discussion in 'Other Slavic Languages' started by monalisa!, May 19, 2013.

  1. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
  2. Azori

    Azori Senior Member

  3. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
  4. Azori

    Azori Senior Member

    That article is about Slovak consonants. You asked about English:
     
  5. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Sounds are the same in all languages, I suppose 'je' is the same sound as in 'yes'
    if that is right, then we cannot translate semivowel with "polosamohlaska"
     
  6. Azori

    Azori Senior Member

    Surely you're kidding...
     
  7. slavic_one

    slavic_one Senior Member

    Prague, Czech Republic
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    No. It says that polosamohláska (or semivokál) is "hláska majúca čiastočne ráz samohlásky, čiastočne ráz spoluhlásky". - Sound having characteristics of both vowel and consonant (for example syllabic l, r, ĺ, ŕ).

    J is a consonant. What's the problem with that? W is not in the Slovak native alphabet (anymore).

    I didn't get that. Why not?

    I suggest you to take a look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_phonology and here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPA#Consonants .
     
  8. slavic_one

    slavic_one Senior Member

    Prague, Czech Republic
    Croatian (štokavski, jekavski)
    And brackets [ and ] are used for sounds, not letters, so don't put letters in them. For example, Slovak sound [ɲ] is represented by the letter ň.
     
  9. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    (phonology does not apply here)
    In your link you may see that all the sounds in the world have been codified in the IPA so [j] it is the same sound and has the same description in all languages
    therefore je [je] has the same sound as yes [jes], I suppose you realize that

    Semivowels are a
    restricted group ( [j], [w] ) of approximants (kĺzavé spoluhkásky)
    they are vowels that cannot be classified as such as they lack their main feature : the are not the nucleus of a syllable
    In SSJ l, r... [l, r . ĺ, ŕ] are called semivowels for the opposite reason: they are consonants, yet the can be syllabic.

    As to [w], you do not list it among Slovak sounds, but I am sure you have it in your language : domov = [domow] and not [domou], and you have it also before a vowel : pôvod = [pwovod], even if, in general, you tend to pronounce ue, uo as diphtongs and kvi as /kvi/ rather than /kwi/, but probably you can find some word in which you do not

    P.S. I put sounds in brackets
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2013
  10. Azori

    Azori Senior Member

  11. monalisa! Senior Member

    Italia
    spanish
    Thanks for the link Azori, I suppose the best translation would be neslabičná samohláska.
     
  12. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    I don't know if it helps, but in Slovak nie and ni je (e.g. v bani je) are pronounced differently. To me, in the first case there is a semivowel (as if it were spelt ňje) and in the second example there is a clear vowel "i" and a clear "j" (as if it were spelt ňije).

    As far as I know, the sound represented by the letter "j" is considered consonant in Slovak, but also e.g. in Hungarian.
     
  13. francisgranada Senior Member

    Slovakia
    Hungarian
    I don't know ... I'd say polosamohláska in Slovak always, when we speak about the semivowel as "sound" (phoneme, not the letter "j", of course). So in nie, rieka, piaty ... we have diphthongs, where the letter "i" represents a polosamholáska or semivokál. But this is only my personal opinion.

    The sounds (phonemes) represented by the letters l, r, ĺ, ŕ are spoluhlásky (consonants), but they may be also slabičné (or slabikotvorné). So from a stricktly "grammatical" point of view they behave sometimes as samohláska, because they can form syllables "alone" (samo, without a vowel). That's why they are called sometimes also polosamohlásky, but I think in this case this term does not correspond to the English semivowel. I personally don't like this usage, because they are clearly consonants (from the phonetical point of view), regardless if they can or cannot form a syllable.
     

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