Slovene: beda mi je...

Discussion in 'Other Slavic Languages' started by iwwi, Mar 3, 2013.

  1. iwwi Junior Member

    Bulgarian
    to mi je pa taka beda za moškega, da ženske butajo kr mal mimo nekje bolj paše, da pa moški to dela mi je pa uh....

    What is she saying here? A variation of "I feel bad for men who...?"

    Zakaj bolj paše?



    Hvala lepa.
     
  2. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Right!

    The author feels that this behavior is more appropriate for women -- it suits (= paše) women better/more (= bolj).
     
  3. iwwi Junior Member

    Bulgarian
    Then I have misunderstood her meaning completely. I thought she was saying "...men who push women when they (the men) pass them (the women) (on the steet?) . Could you please translate her entire sentence into English?
     
  4. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    The first comma should be a period, and that makes this sentence confusing:

    I feel sorry for men who do that. That women "bump past" [I don't know that this refers to; it depends on the context] -- that's somehow more appropriate, but when a man does it, that's just "ugh" [weird/inappropriate] to me.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
  5. iwwi Junior Member

    Bulgarian
    Hvala lepa. Zelo zanimivo.

    Bump passing done by women too, and she even thinks it's more appropriate. I have no idea what it means but it does sound interesting.

    Would you care to throw some light on this or is it beside the language point?
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
  6. iwwi Junior Member

    Bulgarian
    Does nekje here mean "some women" instead of "somewhere?" I don't see anything else in this part of the sentence that may refer to women.
     
  7. TriglavNationalPark

    TriglavNationalPark Senior Member

    Chicago, IL, U.S.A.
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Nekje usually means "somewhere", but in this context it means "somehow" or "somewhat." You can take it out without changing the meaning. It doesn't refer to the women, who are mentioned just once. Remember that the part of the sentence before the comma is actually a separate, stand-alone sentence. (The level of these sentences isn't much above text-speak.)
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2013

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