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Slovene: dni

Discussion in 'Other Slavic Languages' started by Gavril, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    Živijo,

    dni seems to be an inflected form of dan "day", but its meaning is not always clear to me. E.g., I've seen it used in the context teden dni "a week [..?]", and in the recent headline,

    "Krško only among the world's elite [racing sites] for a year [..?]"

    I checked SSKJ and Pons.eu's entries for dan / dni but I'm still not sure I understand what dni means in the above contexts.

    Ali mi lahko pomagate?

    Hvala
     
  2. Irbis Senior Member

    Kamnik, Slovenia
    Slovenian, Slovenia
    "leto dni" means "a year" or "one year" (or in this context "for a year")
    It is similar with "teden dni" and "mesec dni" ("one week" and "one month").

    So:
    "Krško only among the world's elite only for one year"
     
  3. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    Speaking from BCS perspective, though it's apparently similar in Slovene:

    Some units of time are "sticky", in the sense that they must appear in some kind of collocation. They can either behave like numbers, in that they require a noun complement:

    Radio sam minut/sat vremena, tjedan/mjesec/godinu dana.

    or, they must be prefixed with a number, even if it is jedan:

    Radio sam jedan minut/sat/tjedan/mjesec; jednu godinu.

    I don't know the deeper cause for that; I suppose that the apparent redundancy is introduced for clarity.

    This does not hold uniformly for all units of time: for example, sekund(a), decenija or vek (stoljeće) seldom or never take a noun complement (?sekundu vremena, *stoljeće godina), but they gladly accept the number: jednu sekundu, jedno stoljeće.
     
  4. Irbis Senior Member

    Kamnik, Slovenia
    Slovenian, Slovenia
    "Ali imaš sekundo/minuto/uro časa?" is usual question in Slovenian, but we would never said: "Delal sem sekundo/minuto/uro časa.", always "Delal sem eno sekundo/minuto/uro."
    Potem pa "Delal sem en teden." ali "Delal sem teden dni."
     
  5. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    Thanks Irbis & Duya; so is it possible then that dni is an inflected form of eden "1" rather than dan?
     
  6. Duya Senior Member

    Not in WR world
    Whatever
    No, no, it is rodilnik množine of dan: sedem dni ~ teden dni 'seven [of] days ~ [a] week of days'. Irbis and I were discussing a slightly wider issue.
     

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