Sociedad participada al 100%

Discussion in 'Financial Terms' started by leafy, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. leafy New Member

    UK and English
    Hi All!

    Was wondering if someone could help with the following phrase - "...participada al..." I find the "al" really confusing!! Is it a question of who has shares in who or who holds who?!

    Spanish:

    Las condiciones mencionadas son indicativas de una incertidumbre sobre la evolución futura de la actividad de la Sociedad participada al 100% por XXCOMPANY NAMEXX sostenible, como ya hemos mencionado, gracias al apoyo financiero de los accionistas.

    My attempt:

    The abovementioned financial conditions/position are indicative of an uncertainty regarding the future development of the activity of the Company of which XXCOMPANY NAMEXX holds 100% sustainable, as previously mentioned, thanks to financial support from the shareholders.

    Any suggestions would be much appreciated as I´ve got a pretty tight deadline..!
    Thanks so much in advance!
    Leafy
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 26, 2011
  2. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    Hola Leafy:

    The term "sociedad participada" refers to a corporation in which more than 20% but less than 50% of its capital stock is owned by other company (investor company). In English, "sociedad participada" is translated as "investee company".

    However, in your sentence, and in light of the full ownership of the share capital, the phrase "sociedad participada al 100%" means a "wholly-owned investee company".

    I hope this helps you.

    Saludes.:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2011
  3. leafy New Member

    UK and English
    That´s great Ayutuxtepeque!
    Thanks so much for posting a reply so quickly..much appreciated.

    Leafy:)
     
  4. leafy New Member

    UK and English
    So just to check I´ve really got it, the translation of the sentence could be:

    The abovementioned financial conditions/position are indicative of an uncertainty regarding the future development of the sustainable activity of the invested companywholly-owned by XXCOMPANY NAMEXX, as previously mentioned, thanks to financial support from the shareholders.

    Thanks again Ayutuxtepeque!
     
  5. OMT Senior Member

    English - United States
    In this case, it sounds like "wholly-owned subsidiary" is the phrase you're looking for.
     
  6. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    I agree, but please note that the context is referring specifically to a "sociedad participada" and not to a "sociedad subsidiaria", two different kinds of corporations.
     
  7. OMT Senior Member

    English - United States
    In English legalese, there is no distinction between a corporation who operates autonomously of its parent corporation, or one whose day-to-day operations are significantly impacted by this corporation. Both are simply called "wholly-owned subsidiaries" if they maintain their status as a corporation with a separate board of directors (who can be officers of the parent corporation).
     
  8. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    I know, but in this case the context is not referring to English corporations but to Spanish/Latin American corporations. On the other hand, to what English legalese are you referring to? British English? American English? Australian English? I'm not a lawyer, but I understand that in English as in Spanish as well, corporate laws vary significantly from country to country.

    Again, I agree with your suggestion of "wholly-owned subsidiary" as a translation of "sociedad participada al 100%", but, and since we don't now further details at this point, I'd prefer to use "wholly-owned investee company", in order to preserve the spirit of the original text.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  9. OMT Senior Member

    English - United States
    However, "investee company" has no meaning with respect to most English-speaking readers (we've all got similar terms for corporate structures, as they all derive from the same legal sources, even if we represent them differently, i.e. Inc. vs. Ltd.). If you want to retain the distinction in Spanish, then keep the Spanish term "Sociedad Participada," or the abbreviation "S.P." with a definition in parentheses or in a footnote, perhaps. It's nearly pointless to try and come up with a one-to-one translation of civil law principles in a language that almost entirely deals with common law systems.
     
  10. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    In spite of the fact that
    As you say above, this is the most common and used translation of "sociedad participada" into English, actually, this is the standard translation found in glossaries and dictionaries specialized in bilingual financial terminology:

    Sociedad participada → Investee Company: Source 1 , Source 2 , Source 3 , Source 4

    Please, consider that "investee company" is a specialized term and therefore might not sound familiar for the majority of English speakers. It is exactly the same case with "sociedad participada", a term not so familiar for a lot of Spanish speakers.:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2011
  11. OMT Senior Member

    English - United States
    So, the question is whether you're more interested in having the common dictionary definition, or actually translating the meaning (which is almost entirely unfamiliar to those operating within a common law system). I'd still err on the side of retaining the Spanish word with an explanation in a footnote or something. I'd feel no schadenfreude if our friend were to commit a faux pas by leaving the boss feeling nonplussed. ;)
     
  12. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    Well, my final advice here is to leave in the hands of the "forista" the final decision.
     
  13. Ayutuxtepeque

    Ayutuxtepeque Moderador

    San Salvador, El Salvador
    Español salvadoreño
    Hola Leafy:

    Three little things:

    a)Since the paragraph does not specify the nature of the mentioned conditions (financial, market, economic/political conjuncture, etc.), I'd suggest you to translate "condiciones" just as "conditions".

    b)The term "actividad", in my opinion, sounds better if you use "business" instead of "activity".

    c)Finally, and regarding "sociedad participada al 100%", again, in my opinion, the term that best renders this meaning in English is "wholly-owned investee company", however, I also agree with the OMT's suggestion on "wholly-owned subsidiary company". Your final decision will depend upon your global context.:)

    Un saludo.:)
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2011
  14. leafy New Member

    UK and English
    Thanks for your help!
    Sorry, as I´m not familiar with the forums yet, I thought I would receive notifications of additional threads. In the end I decided to use "wholly-owned investee company".

    Many thanks all!
     

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