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soldados israelíes están apostados en las inmediaciones

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by awkuhn, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. awkuhn Senior Member

    Toronto, Canada
    Canada, English, German
    La cifra de muertos supera ya los 350, con 1.500 heridos. Pese a ello, Israel descarta un alto el fuego y anuncia una larga campaña militar contra Hamás, que también asegura que seguirá la lucha. Por el momento, Israel se centra en los ataques aéreos, pero miles de soldados israelíes están apostados en las inmediaciones de Gaza para entrar cuando lo ordene su Gobierno.

    Based on the context I gather that "están apostados" actually translates to something like "are placed/dispatched"

    At this time, Israel is concentrating in aerial attack, but thousands of Israeli soldiers are in place in the vicinities of tha Gaza strip to enter when the Government orders them to do so.

    I guess, what I find interesting is to use the verb "apostar - to bet" in this sentence. I was not aware that the verb "apostar" has other meanings than "to bet". What am I missing?

    Or should it be "están puestos" ???

    Happy New Year!
     
  2. cyberpedant

    cyberpedant Senior Member

    North Adams, MA
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    From the DRAE:


    tr. y prnl. Situarse una o más personas en determinado lugar para algún fin:



    1. apostar la tropa; el ladrón se apostó tras la puerta.
    Obviously not the most common meaning.
     
  3. patin Senior Member

    USA
    Costa Rica español
    I would say "waiting in place"

    patin
     
  4. patin Senior Member

    USA
    Costa Rica español
    Ia wasn't sure but now I found it:

    post2 verbo transitivo
      1. (position) ‹policeman/soldier› apostar
    So I guess the right way to translate would be "posted"

    patin
     
  5. juandiego

    juandiego SE modera

    Granada. España
    Spanish from Spain
    Yes, something like placed. That acceptation of the verb "apostar" is directly related -both share similar Latin root- with the noun "puesto"; a place someone/something occupies to a specific aim.

    It could also be "postar" though now this term is in disuse.

    Oddly apostar as to bet and to place have the same Italian root "posta" but they have evolved from two different senses of said word.
     
  6. juandiego

    juandiego SE modera

    Granada. España
    Spanish from Spain
    Aha! Agree. WR dictionary already knew it.
    This English one confirms so.
    post (2)
    tr.v. posted, posting, posts
    1. To assign to a specific position or station: post a sentry at the gate.
     

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