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someone, somebody, anyone, anybody, nobody, no-one

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Alrak, Oct 17, 2010.

  1. Alrak Junior Member

    Spanish
    Hi!

    Is it the same someone and somebody?
    Do anyone, anybody, no-one, nobody mean the same thing?

    Do these sentences have the same idea?

    There is nobody eating pizza.
    There is no-one eating pizza.
    There isn't anyone eating pizza.
    There isn't anybody eating pizza.

    If there is a difference between them, can you tell which one is.

    Thank you
     
  2. ME GRIMLOCK

    ME GRIMLOCK Senior Member

    RAAAAAAAAAAAR (Southern California
    English -- Amrrrrrrcan
    Those sentences all mean the same thing. That's not to say that all those words mean the same thing. Nobody and no one (which doesn't usually have a hyphen) mean the same thing. Anyone and anybody mean the same thing. Someone and somebody mean the same thing. But you cannot freely substitute any others for ones that are not in their pair of -one and -body.
     
  3. Thank you Senior Member

    English - U.S.A.
    Hi,

    As far as I understand, there is only a slight difference in meaning--if any at all. Stylistically, however, different expressions work better with specific constructions. Here are some typical ways to express this.

    There is nobody eating pizza. Nobody is eating (any) pizza.

    There is no-one eating pizza. No one is eating (any) pizza.

    There isn't anyone eating pizza. (I believe this is technically correct, but I don't hear this very often, so it doesn't sound right to me.)

    There isn't anybody eating pizza. (Same with this one.)

    Note: Adding the word "any" emphasizes the fact that there is plenty of pizza available, and you're surprised nobody has even touched it. You're hoping they do, perhaps.
     
  4. Alrak Junior Member

    Spanish
    Thank you, that was really helpful
     
  5. Alrak Junior Member

    Spanish
    One more question, in these sentences how do I know what to put?, or is it correct to use both of them?

    There is _____________ at the door. (someone / somebody)
    He didn't speak to ______________ about it. (anybody / anyone)
    He will bring ____________ with him. (nobody / no one)
    ____________ told me that you called last night. (No one / nobody)
     
  6. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Both are equally correct, and the meaning is (almost) the same. To me, the -body words seem more definite and the -one words more abstract:

    There is nobody who can comfort me.
    No hay nadie que puede consolarme.

    There is no one who can comfort me.
    No hay nadie que me pueda consolar.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2010
  7. Thank you Senior Member

    English - U.S.A.
    There is _____________ at the door. (someone / somebody) Either one works here.
    He didn't speak to ______________ about it. (anybody / anyone) Either one again.
    He will bring ____________ with him. (nobody / no one) He won't bring anybody, anyone. (Technically, I think you could use "nobody/anybody," but this construction sounds funny to my ear.)
    ____________ told me that you called last night. (No one / nobody) Either one works here again.

    Hope this helps! :)
     
  8. Alrak Junior Member

    Spanish
    Thank you, it helps! :)
     
  9. Noel Oderfla Senior Member

    This is interesting. May I add my question here? I understand that "everybody" is used in plural, and "everyone" in singular.
    "Everybody sing"
    "Everyone sings"
    Is that right?
     
  10. Alrak Junior Member

    Spanish
    Although everybody is plural in form, you have to use a singular verb, Everybody sings, everybody works, everybody is happy.
     

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