someter a una operación

Discussion in 'Medical Terminology' started by ELENA9968, May 11, 2008.

  1. ELENA9968 Senior Member

    SPAIN
    "ello requería una preparación especial, por la cual X sería sometida a una operación por la cual sería cortado en único hilo cartilaginoso por el cual los hemisferios del cerebro están conectados."

    Mi intento:

    "It implied a special preparation. X would have a surgery done and the single gristly thread by which the two hemispheres of the brain are connected would be severed"

    What do you think?
     
  2. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    ello requería una preparación especial,
    por la cual X sería sometida a una operación
    por la cual sería cortado el único hilo cartilaginoso
    por el cual los hemisferios del cerebro están conectados."

    It implied a special preparation

    in which X would have an operation,
    in which X would be subjected to surgery,

    and the single cartilaginous fiber
    with which the two hemispheres (of the brain) are connected would be cut.

    and they would cut the the single cartilaginous fiber that connects the two hemispheres (of the brain).


    Can you give us more information?
    This doesn't sound "technical"...where is it from?
     
  3. ELENA9968 Senior Member

    SPAIN
    Thanks Timla,
    It's from a book... I'm working on a script... Sorry but I can't tell you more at the moment...
     
  4. Belle_85

    Belle_85 Senior Member

    Spanish - Argentina
    X would have to undergo a surgery in which...
     
  5. Eugin

    Eugin Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina (Spanish)
    Hi Tim!!! How are you!!!???
    Since you used both terms (operation/ surgery), can you tell me the difference between them or in which cases do you use each one?


    Thanks a lot! :)
     
  6. TimLA

    TimLA Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    English - US
    Hey Eugin!

    Often, the word "operation" is used colloquially, and is clearly less formal that "surgery".
    Both can be used interchangeably, but if you are working on a formal or semi-formal document, then I'd almost always go for "surgery".

    But again, I can think of many examples of where "operation" would be used in very academic situations.
     
  7. LeaM

    LeaM Senior Member

    U.S.
    English
    undergo surgery
     
  8. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Is it possible to alternatively say along with "undergo" the following:
    He must subject himself to an operation or a new treatment soon.
    He must submit himself to an operation or a new soon.
    .
    (Spanish: Debe someterse pronto a una operación o a un nuevo tratamiento)

    Thank you very much. I appreciate your comments
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
  9. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Has someone any comment or remark regarding my yesterday post?
    Thank you
     
  10. liciar Junior Member

    Michigan, USA
    Spanish/Argentina

    In general, "subject" and "submit" are used more to indicate submission (surrender, yielding, etc.). "Undergo" is a far more common term to use with the phrase "someterse a un tratamiento/operación."

    Obviously the meaning is still close, as the patient is allowing him or herself to be treated, but for some reason we hear "undergo treatment" much more often than "be subjected to an operation." The latter sounds like the treatment was done completely against the patient's will.
     
  11. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Thank you very much Liciar. Crystalclear!
     
  12. LeaM

    LeaM Senior Member

    U.S.
    English
    :thumbsup: I agree with liciar. I've never heard "subject" or "submit" used in this context. Saludos.
     
  13. EricEnfermero Senior Member

    La UCI Neonatal
    US - English
    "Submit to an operation" is a very old term. If you Google the phrase with quotation marks, you'll come up with tons of hits, but the sources are often from the early 20th century, a period of time when patients frequently did "submit" to the desires of the treating physician. The term has definitely decreased in popularity. Now that patients have become more empowered and do not play a submissive role to physicians in their medical decisions, the term sounds odd.

    Depending on the register, I agree with "undergo surgery" or just "have surgery" or "have an operation."

    I typed this response before realizing the age of the original post, but this is a good discussion nonetheless.

    Eric
     
  14. Gamen Senior Member

    Near Buenos Aires
    Spanish Argentina
    Very useful and interesting the comments of you all.
    Thank you.
     

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