1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)
  1. trinityman Junior Member

    USA, English
    Hello,

    I'm wondering how one would literally call a pig, as in, make a hog call. A couple of disclaimers based on previous failed attempts at getting this from other natives: 1) I'm not asking what 'un cri de cochon' would be (which in English would be oink oink) or 2) what the term used to describe it would be (e.g. not 'grouinement'). I would like to know the equivalent of the call sooie in English, which is what farmers might use to get the pigs to race back into their sties.

    Thanks so much for any help you can give!
     
  2. toban

    toban Senior Member

    Québec
    English - Canada
    This seems like an Americanism to me. I have seen it spelled "sooee."

    Do hog farmers in French-speaking places call their pigs?
     
  3. pyan

    pyan Senior Member

    Vendée, France
    English, UK, London
    Are there parts of France where pigs roam around a village, or in fields without boundaries, so need to be called? I'm sure it happened a few generations ago. It's possible that it happened in other francophone countries and there may have been cries. As in the USA, the calls would probably be local.

    These calls, sooie, sooey, soo ee and all the variations probably belong to a particular time and place, the "settlement" of the mid-west where wandering pigs needed to be "called".
    (source).

    Hog-calling, or pig-calling, seemed to become part of the country culture in some mid-western states (source) of the USA. A hog or pig call is still used as a cheer by the University of Arkansas teams (source).

    Hog or pig calling is so odd to British English ears that it featured in one of P.G. Wodehouse's hilarious short stories. (source).

    I don't think this needs to be translated, just explained.
     
  4. Kecha Senior Member

    Paris
    French - France
    Apparently, they used to be called with "coch-coch" which would be the origin of the word "cochon" (against "porc", "goret", etc.).
    But I'm not sure if that's still used, given that it's all industrialized now. They don't go out so they're not called...
     

Share This Page