1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

sornione

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by joanvillafane, May 11, 2012.

  1. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Hello, everybody. There's only one thread on "sorriso sornione" which does not answer my question, so here goes:
    I see in the dictionary that "sornione" is an adjective and I understand it that way. This sentence seems to be using it as an adverb - or am I not getting something here?
    Context: Camilleri's La concessione del telefono - A rather paranoid "prefetto" is reading malevolent intent into how his name was misspelled in a letter:

    Questo làido individuo, cambiando con la "p" la "m" del mio cognome, in realtà allude sornione.

    I don't really need a translation to English - I guess it's more or less: This individual is making sly/sneaky/underhanded allusions. But I'd just like to understand the structure. Allude is the verb so is sornione an adverb? Allude in modo sornione? Is it an archaic style (the novel is set in 1891.)

    Thanks!
     
  2. Blackman

    Blackman Senior Member

    Island of Sardinia, Italy
    Italiano/Sardo
     
  3. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Grazie, Blackman!
     
  4. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    Ciao, Joan :)

    This may help as well: in your sentence the adjective "sornione" is called "complemento predicativo del soggetto".

    "Questo làido individuo [...] allude sornione":

    - Questo laido individuo: soggetto
    - allude: predicato verbale
    - sornione: complemento predicativo del soggetto

    This structure is used whener it is necessary to complete the meaning of the verb by attributing a special quality to the subject: "Marta vive serena" or "I bambini giocano tranquilli".
     
  5. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Oh, yes, thanks a lot, Anja.Ann - that's exactly the explanation I was looking for. I don't think we can do that in English, except with copulative verbs - be/seem/feel/ etc. - The children seem happy. Very very helpful.
     
  6. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
  7. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Thanks again - that's a great resource. I've saved it in my favorites!
     
  8. Anja.Ann

    Anja.Ann Senior Member

    Lombardia
    Italian
    So glad I could help you, Joan :)
     

Share This Page