1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

State vs to say / said

Discussion in 'English Only' started by green_olive, Dec 2, 2008.

  1. green_olive Junior Member

    english
    Hey again

    would it be too pretentious if i used the word " state " appose to " to say or " said " ?

    ie - I stated and explained why i didnt like the movie

    or

    I already said and explained why i didnt like the movie

    or

    He stated he would meet us as the movies as this time

    or

    He said he would meet us at the movies at this time

    thanks for your help!
     
  2. Au101 Senior Member

    London
    England, English (UK)
    Whilst state can be pretentious (especially number 2. I wouldn't use this as you're talking about an informal situation,) sometimes it is the best option. "I stated and explained..." might be the best option in a formal scenario, perhaps if you were writing a formal letter to a film director, and it was your job to suggest changes to his film. However, if you were talking to a friend "I stated" would sound pretentious. But "I have already said and explained" doesn't sound right to me. I would prefer something like

    "I told you why I didn't like the movie", or "I have already been over why...", or even just, "I have already explained..." I'm not sure "I have already said why..." is gramatically correct.
     
  3. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    In the U.S., "state" tends to be stilted and often used in writing by people who don't write very much and when they do, think they suddenly need to be more formal than natural.

    If you read American newspapers, "state" or "stated" is seldom used and a simple "said" predominates in attribution.

    I think you mean "as opposed to."
     
  4. Aardvark01

    Aardvark01 Senior Member

    Midlands, England
    British English (Midlands)
    It may not necessarily be pretentious, but it is wrong for two reasons:
    1. Register
    'State' belongs in formal language, as in: 'he made a statment to the press/to the police/to Parliament...'
    or when quoting a text as an authority: 'Paragraph four, subsection 2a states...' 'As stated in the previous chapter...'

    2. Redundancy
    In informal conversation why would you want to repeat verbs relating to speech? Amplifying the main clause in this way detracts from the point of the subclause - that you did not like the film:
    I stated and explained why i didnt like the movie
    I already said and explained why I didnt like the movie
    I already said and explained why I didnt like the movie

    The only way to make the third option sound correct is to change the setting:
    He (the accused) stated he would meet us as the movies as this time your honour.
     
  5. green_olive Junior Member

    english
    Sorry for the bump guys!

    just wanted to say thanks for the replies!
     

Share This Page