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Steady Eddy/Eddie

Discussion in 'English Only' started by kuku44i, Dec 8, 2010.

  1. kuku44i

    kuku44i Junior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Hello,

    i've watched several episodes of the Apprentice UK and have heard "Steady Eddie" (i am not sure about spelling) being mentioned. I am wondering what it means and the etymology of the phrase. If anyone knows could you please share this information. Thank you.

    D.
     
  2. bibliolept

    bibliolept Senior Member

    Northern California
    AE, Español
    "Steady Eddy" can be used to describe a person as stolid and even overly cautious and conservative, I believe.

    I don't know that it has a specific origin: It may simply be an example of reduplication.
     
  3. grubble

    grubble Senior Member

    South of England, UK
    British English
    A steady Eddie is a person who does everything by the rules and doesn't take risks. The "Eddie" part is simply to rhyme with "steady".

    The meaning is flexible, Edward George ex Governor of the Bank of England, was given the name because of his determination to stabilise the economy. http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/1233712.stm
     
  4. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Interesting. I didn't know that "Steady Eddie/Eddy" was a fixed expression in this country. I've never heard anyone say "He's a steady Eddie/Eddy".
     
  5. kuku44i

    kuku44i Junior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    Thanks, guys.
    as for fixed expression, Alan Sugar mentions this at the beginning of each Apprentice episode in some seasons of the show. And a few times the phrase was addressed to candidates whether they can describe themselves as "steady eddies".
     
  6. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I see. The meaning is clear, but I doubt if this expression is widely used by the public. It might be business jargon, it might be Alan Sugar's own invention or it might be an expression that he took from the USA (which would not surprise me, as business is one of the main conduits for the introduction of Americanisms into the UK). It might be none of these. When I saw the expression in the title of this thread, I thought it was the nickname of Edward George, the former Governor of the Bank of England mentioned above by grubble.
     
  7. ewhite

    ewhite Senior Member

    USA/English
    "Steady Eddie" is used in the USA, and has been for quite some time. Ed Giacomin, goalie of the New York Rangers from 1965-1975, was known through most of his career by that name.
     
  8. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Can it be applied to other people, though, ewhite? Is "He's a steady Eddie" possible in American English (where "he" is someone other than Ed Giacomin)?
     
  9. ewhite

    ewhite Senior Member

    USA/English
    A little googling has led me to believe it is a sports sobriquet in the USA. Eddie Murray of the Baltimore Orioles and Eddie Lopat of the New York Yankees (baseball players) were both referred to as "Steady Eddie".

    Though it does look like your first name must be Eddie to be so honored in sports, I would have no problems referring to someone as a "steady Eddie",
     
  10. Is the Apprentice UK character also named Edward or a variation thereof?

    I have certainly heard the nickname "steady Eddie" for people who are named Edward. I am not familiar with its use as a more general slang term for anyone, regardless of name, who is steady, reliable, etc.
     
  11. kuku44i

    kuku44i Junior Member

    Russia
    Russian
    a little adgy, it wasn't about someone in particular, because there were no Edwards in that season.
     

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