1. The WordReference Forums have moved to new forum software. (Details)

stopover/layover

Discussion in 'English Only' started by WritingAPuppy, Mar 18, 2008.

  1. WritingAPuppy Senior Member

    canada mandarin
    In terms of flying, what exactly is a stopover? Thanks
     
  2. xhalli Senior Member

    Mexico, DF
    México Spanish
    A stop durin a trip, especially during a flight
     
  3. WritingAPuppy Senior Member

    canada mandarin
    Do you mean the airplane landed at a place that's not the destination for refueling purpose?

    Does the airplane merely fly overhead the place, or does it actually have to land for it to qualify as a stopover.
     
  4. xhalli Senior Member

    Mexico, DF
    México Spanish
    Not only for refueling, it can also be to take more passengers to the final destination.
    They land in another place it is a stop, remember?
     
  5. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    A "stopover" has a particular meaning in terms of the travel industry and the airlines in particular.

    It is not just a stop, but an extended period of time that a traveler spends at a location in excess of the time required to change planes or the original plane to spend at a stop enroute.

    For example, let's say I want to fly to Río de Janeiro, but I go by way of São Paulo. At São Paulo, I disembark, spend a night or two and then continue on to Río. That's a stopover.

    Some classes of tickets permit stopovers at no extra charge and others do not.
     
  6. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I agree with sdgraham.

    If you just had to stay in the airport for a few hours to change planes or flights, that would be a "layover".
     
  7. María Madrid

    María Madrid Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    As a former air hostess I can confirm we actually used stopover just when landing at an airport, sometimes because it was the final destination for some of the passengers aboard (while others continued their trip to the next airport on the very same plane) or simply when refueling. The flight number would still be the same in all cases.

    Sometimes the passengers where allowed to stay on board during the stopover, some times not.
     
  8. WritingAPuppy Senior Member

    canada mandarin
    So if someone disembarks one flight and catches another, (because he's going to a different destination than the original one", is that a stopover too?
     
  9. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    What is the difference, then, between stopover and layover?
     
  10. María Madrid

    María Madrid Senior Member

    Madrid, Spain
    Spanish Spain
    I don't think I ever heard of layover for one flight and different stops with the same flight number. Probably layover is used as you described, you have a connection flight after the first one, with a different flight number and maybe even flying with a different airline. On the other hand maybe it could be an European usage of those terms. Just guessing. :)
     
  11. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    I cannot speak for non-U.S. carriers, but a searah of U.S. carriers and their fare rules will show that such is not the case in the U.S. For example, go to www.united.com and do a site search for "stopover."
     
  12. ticcota Senior Member

    Japanese
    Hi,

    Is there a different meaning between "stopover" and "layover" for an international flight?
    e.g.
    "Do I have to recheck my baggage during a stopover for an international flight?"

    or
    "Do I have to recheck my baggage during a layover for an international flight?"[/I]

    Do these two sentences have the same meaning?

    Thank you.
     
  13. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    I found these helpful definitions on www.businessdictionary.com:

    Layover

    Period spent by a passenger at an intermediate point in waiting for a connecting flight or other form of travel.

    Stopover

    Deliberate and planned interruption of a journey for 24 or more hours.
     

Share This Page