Subjective Complement - turning the leaves green

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by ARCION, Jun 28, 2011.

  1. ARCION

    ARCION Junior Member

    Spanish
    Hi everyone!
    I have a doubt in a sentece about which part of it is the subjuctive complement...
    This is the sentence:

    The cold weather is turning the leaves green.

    Is the: is turning the leaves green the subjective complement?
    Or only the gerund: turning?

    Thanks! :D
     
  2. Irma2011 Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    No, en esta frase hay un 'objective complement', es decir un complemento del objeto directo. El objeto directo es 'the leaves', y hay una palabra que modifica a este objeto directo, que es 'green'.

    'Subjective complement' sería el complemento del sujeto:

    "The leaves are green in summer but turn golden in autum"

    Aquí 'leaves' es el sujeto, lo que hace de 'green' y de 'golden' 'subjective complements'. En español se les suelen llamar complementos predicativos (del sujeto o del objeto directo) porque 'complemento subjetivo y complemento objetivo' se refieren a otra cosa: en la frase "el amor de los hijos", por ejemplo, los hijos pueden ser quienes aman o quienes son amados, es decir, 'complemento subjetivo' en el primer caso y 'complemento objetivo' en el segundo.

    Espero que esto te ayude.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2011
  3. SevenDays Senior Member

    Spanish
    Just to add to what Irma explained so well:
    In the cold weather is turning the leaves green, the verb to be ("is") functions as an auxiliary verb; it expresses the present progressive aspect (ongoing) of the verb: is turning. The past progressive would be with be in the past tense: was turning.
    In the leaves are green in summer, the verb to be ("are") functions as a linking verb; it "links" the subject ("leaves") to the subject complement ("green").
    Irma's full example is interesting:
    The leaves are green in summer but turn golden in autumn
    The long version is, the leaves are green in summer but the leaves turn golden in autumn.
    "Golden" goes with "turn," not with "are." "Turn" is usually a transitive verb (I turn the pages of the book, where "the pages" is the object of "turn"), or intransitive (his hair turned gray, where "gray" is the complement of "turned". "Gray" completes the meaning of "turned" but isn't an object). Similarly, in the leaves turn golden, "turn" is intransitive and "goldent" its complement. However, in this example, "turn" also assumes a linking verb role because it is closely linked to the meaning of "are." That is, the meaning is similar to the leaves are green in summer but are golden in autumn. Some have a fancy name for it: complex intransitive with predicative complement. The point is that "turn" often has this "linking verb" air. Another example, the milk turned sour = the milk is sour.

    Cheers
     
  4. ARCION

    ARCION Junior Member

    Spanish
    Thanks guys! I have an exam so I was practising....now is much clearer now :D
     
  5. Irma2011 Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    :thumbsup:
    Nos alegramos.
     

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