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Such a good news/ such good news ??

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Grammar / Gramática Español-Inglés' started by Pilar Polledo, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. Pilar Polledo

    Pilar Polledo Senior Member

    España - Castellano
    Hola,

    Cual sería la forma correcta?

    Dear Mr. Brown,

    1. Thank you so much for contacting me with such good news.
    1. Thank you so much for contacting me with such a good news.
    Gracias. :)
     
  2. jackaustralia Senior Member

    Australia English
    Thank you so much for contacing me with such good news. I am pretty sure news would be uncountable so you don't use 'a.'
     
  3. Pilar Polledo

    Pilar Polledo Senior Member

    España - Castellano
    Yes, but ... maybe 'a' goes with 'such' ?!! ; 'such a'
     
  4. jackaustralia Senior Member

    Australia English
    I can see what you are saying but I can tell you it does not sound right to my ear. (No suena bien)
     
  5. mantxi Junior Member

    English
    Español - España
    I also think that it would be without that "a". Same happens when applied to more than one object:

    I don't like such a big car.
    I don't like such big cars.
     
  6. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    "Such good news" :tick:
    "Such a good news" :cross:
     
  7. phosphore Senior Member

    Serbian
    "Such a good news" is certainly correct, but it means that there was only one (news), while "such good news" means there were more than one (news).
     
  8. Pilar Polledo

    Pilar Polledo Senior Member

    España - Castellano
    Everybody seems to agree with ' Such good news', except Phosphore, whose opinion really confuses me even more ... :(
     
  9. phosphore Senior Member

    Serbian
    Your friend contacted you with, let's say, three really good news. Then you would say "thank you for contacting me with such good news".
    Your friend contacted you with a really good news. Then you would say "thank you for contacting me with such a good news".
     
  10. El escoces Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    English - UK
    In English, there is no such thing as "one" news, news is always uncountable - so "such a good news" can never be correct. If you want to refer to the singular, it has to be "one news item" or "one piece of news".
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2009
  11. El escoces Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    English - UK
    As I said, this can never be correct, phosphore.
     
  12. phosphore Senior Member

    Serbian
  13. Pilar Polledo

    Pilar Polledo Senior Member

    España - Castellano
    OK, El escoces, it must be cause 'news' is uncountable. I thought that 'a' could go with 'such' instead of with 'news': 'such a', but as Jackaustralia said, it doesn't seem right.

    So, in conclusion:

    Thank you so much for contacting me with such good news.

    Thanks everybody for your opinion and help! :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2009
  14. El escoces Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    English - UK
    I understand your confusion. The dangers of relying on Google searches! These results (for "such a good news") appear to be a mixture of errors - in blogs and so forth written by non-native speakers - and phrases such as "such a good news day", where the indefinite article refers to "day" rather than "news".
     
  15. phosphore Senior Member

    Serbian
    I see. Thank you very much.
     
  16. zetem Senior Member

    Canada, English
    El escoce,

    In English, the word "news" is a singular uncountable word. Because it is uncountable (not because it is plural) we say "such news" (not *such a news*). To make it countable, one can say "a piece of news" There are a few more words in English ending with -s but are singular (measles, billiards, draughts).
     
  17. El escoces Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    English - UK
    You're correct, I wasn't concentrating. I have edited my earlier post. I was attempting to contrast English with other languages in which, of course, "news" is considered countable.
     
  18. Prower Senior Member

    Russian
    Even though the discussion has been over for a long time I would like to add something. I don't agree (even though I am not a native speaker) with the opinion that - such a good news - is wrong.

    News is an uncountable noun. And usually such nouns are not used with the article - A. However, when we use an adjective describing the noun it is normal to use the article - A.

    For example.

    Is "pride" a countable or uncountable noun? It is an uncountable noun. So, we are not to use it with - A. However, if we add an ajective here then it can work fine.

    There was pride too, a bitter and overwhelming pride. (Ch. Dickens)

    Why is that we say "pride" without A in the first case and with A in the second case?

    Just because we see an ajective being used.
     
  19. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    From WR Dictionary (English-Spanish):

    pride /praɪd/ sustantivo
    1. uncountable
      1. (self-respect) orgullo m;

    1. countable
      1. (source of pride) orgullo m;
    News, on the other hand, is always uncountable:

    news /nu:z/ ||/nju:z/ n uncountable
     
  20. Prower Senior Member

    Russian
    Good try! But you have missed.

    If we adopt this point then we need to admit that in the first part of the sentence the authour uses - (self-respect) orgullo, but in the second one he is talking about (source of pride) orgullo. This is nonsense. It is obvious that in the second part of the sentence we have the save pride as we have in the first part of the sentence.

    If there were - A pride - in the first part of the sentence then you would prove that pride is contable here otherwise it is uncountable.

    On the top of that, here a few more exmples

    A great amazement came upon him. (TH. Hardy)


    Or do you want to say that AMAZEMENT is also countable here? )))
     
  21. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    "Amazement" behaves differently from "news". You can say "a great amazement" but you can't say "a great/good news".
     
  22. Prower Senior Member

    Russian
    News and amazement are uncountable nouns.

    This kind of statemant doesn't sound convincing without backing it up.

    "Amazement" behaves differently from "news"

    I can prove my point. They behave the same way as they are both uncountable. I don't see your arguments protecting backing up your statement.
     
  23. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    The argument is usage. It's not possible to quote a "rule" written by some "expert" in grammar for every single word in the language. If I started saying "a good news", my friends and neighbours would look at me very strangely. I've never heard it spoken or seen it written by a native speaker.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2010
  24. Prower Senior Member

    Russian
    It is not an argument. I heard americans say - a good news.
     
  25. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    So have Dickens and Hardy, then. Grammars and dictionaries say one thing, writers say whatever they want -that's their privilege-, so what?
     
  26. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I haven't. I suspect you heard some Americans whose first language was not English.
     
  27. Prower Senior Member

    Russian
    Reread my post. Dictionaries don't study words in contexts but writers do. I didn't give you a word but a sentence and you just used a definition from a dictionary which cannot help in specific situation.

    I ask you again. Are there two kinds of pride in that sentence? Answer this question.
     
  28. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    Easy, mate.
    I can read it a thousand times and I won't say there are two kinds of 'pride' in that sentence. There are two different usages.
     
  29. Prower Senior Member

    Russian
    No. They were born in the USA and have lived there more than 50 years.

    Again, this is a good news of deliverance from sin’s penalty, power and presence through the two advents of Christ.
     
  30. Prower Senior Member

    Russian
    Usages are based on something. It doesn't explain much if you say - There are two different usages. What are the prerequisites for each usage? I know you don't know that.
     
  31. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Who or what are you quoting here?
     

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