suffer or suffer from

Discussion in 'English Only' started by MaDF, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. MaDF New Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Dear all,
    I have a question for you. I was writing an essay about the First World War and the so called "shell-shock". My sentence was the following:
    "the previous feelings of glory and patriotism lost much of their impact as many of those who had survived suffered psychological trauma, known as shell-shock, etc."

    Or should it be "suffered from psychological trauma"?

    The dictionary doesn't help much as there are examples using both structures. However, there seems to be a slight difference but I can't quite put my finger on it.
    Can you help me?
    Thanks :)
    MaDF

    PS The essay is for my personal use only (not for school or other academic purposes) so you're not helping me to cheat. Just as you know...
     
  2. perpend

    perpend Senior Member

    American English
    I would use "suffered from".
     
  3. MaDF New Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Is there a difference in meaning?
     
  4. perpend

    perpend Senior Member

    American English
    It's a really good question, MaDF.

    ... who had survived suffered psychological trauma ...
    ... who had survived suffered from/under psychological trauma ...

    I think you are right that "to suffer something" is idiomatic. Sorry I can't help further, as a native speaker!
     
  5. MaDF New Member

    Italy
    Italian
    ok, could it be that if you "suffer something" you feel that kind of pain, whereas if you "suffer from" something that something is the cause of that pain?
     

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