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suited/fit into [person]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by loureed4, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Hello,

    I am an English learner, who is trying to figure out the differences in usage between "suited" and "fit".

    So, I have these four sentences, which, in my opinion, can be used interchangeably , for their meaning is the same, or that is what I think:

    "He is suited for this type of work" (this one is taken from on example in the wordreference dictionary, here)
    "He fits in/into this type of work"
    "He is cut out for this type of work"
    "He perfectly matches this type of work" (I am not so certain about this one)

    Maybe there are subtle nuances among them?, if so, are they very little?

    Thanks in advance!
    :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2013
  2. MuttQuad

    MuttQuad Senior Member

    New York, NY
    English - AmE
    In your examples, the meanings are pretty much the same, although the last one is worded a bit more awkwardly than you are likely to hear in everyday use.
     
  3. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Thanks a lot MuttQuad for your assistance! :)

    Post Scriptum: Maybe people aren´t replying because they think my question is taken from a test or something. Nothing furthest from reality, it is just that I studied "fit" and "suit" and of course I knew too "cut out for" and "match", and often I am very curious about nuances or even more, about to make the same sentence in different ways, to broaden my vocabulary and English structures.

    :rolleyes:
     
  4. sdgraham

    sdgraham Senior Member

    Oregon, USA
    USA English
    My thoughts (highly personal):

    "He is suited for this type of work" (this one is taken from on example in the wordreference dictionary, here)

    Means his age, education, experience and other qualifications are appropriate.​

    "He fits in/into this type of work"
    :thumbsdown:

    I would not use "fits" in this context, although the work might be "fitting" for him, meaning "appropriate."

    "He is cut out for this type of work"


    Means he has the disposition (perhaps including patience) and physical ability to optimally perform the work in question. (But nothing implied about education or experience)​

    "He perfectly matches this type of work" (I am not so certain about this one) :thumbsdown: (although his qualifications might match the job requirements)

    In the world of hot and cold running nuances, however, others might feel differently

    Good luck.
     
  5. e2efour Senior Member

    England (aged 73)
    UK English
    I would only use suited for/to (or suitable for) or cut out for when talking about a person.

    I don't think fit or match works. On the other hand, I might say that someone's profile fits/matches this type of work. To me, fit into implies a physical connection (or someone not fitting into clothes because of their size).
     
  6. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    I vote with SDGraham and E2efour: suited or cut out only.
     
  7. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Thanks all for your prompt and kind replies!

    Wow, I don´t think this is an easy one, although I understood all your points, but I will have to reread them.

    sdgraham, your explanation is great, I think I understand better now, although as remarked before, I´ll have to reread it.

    e2efour, very interesting the point about "His profile matches this type..." but not "He matches this type of work" ...kind of difficult and moreover, easy to forget for a learner at first. Thanks a lot for that nuance!

    Thanks sdgraham, e2efour and Parla. :rolleyes:
     

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