sure promises

Discussion in 'English Only' started by min300, Jul 15, 2007.

  1. min300

    min300 Senior Member

    Tehran
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    Hi everyone,

    What are different common ways of saying this:
    You promise and you are sure that you can keep or fulfill it.


    For example:

    If you take her advice...

    1. ...you can promise your family and friends being sure that you can fulfill/keep it.

    2. ...you can make sure promises to your family and friends.

    3. ...you can promise your family and friends for sure.

    4. ... you can promise your family and friends certainly.( This one doesn't sound correct to me)

    Are these correct? Would you say it in another way?

    I would be happy to see any comments.
     
  2. coiffe

    coiffe Senior Member

    Oman
    English (USA)
    If you take her advice, you can promise your family you're sure to fulfill it. Or you can assure them you'll fulfill your promise.
     
  3. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    This question is based on the sad truth that people are abusing the word "promise".

    --..........Your promise is solid/good.
     
  4. min300

    min300 Senior Member

    Tehran
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    Thank you Coiffe. Here I wanted to say that the person is sure that he can keep his promise, It is not necessary that he tells his family. I wanted to say that the promise is sure itself.
    Actually its a part of translation from Persian into English. I don't know if I explained it well.
    Can we say 'sure promise'?
     
  5. min300

    min300 Senior Member

    Tehran
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    Thank you my friend. what do you think about my sentences? Are any of them correct?
     
  6. coiffe

    coiffe Senior Member

    Oman
    English (USA)
    There are many ways to say this.

    You can say "It's a sure promise" but that's not as strong as some other ways of saying it.

    "That's my promise and I assure you I shall keep it."
    "That's my word to you and I promise you it won't be broken."
    "I promise you I'll do it and you can rely on that."
    "I give you my solemn word, and you can take that to the bank."

    I'm sure others will have equally good suggestions. Many good ways to say this.
     
  7. nichec

    nichec Senior Member

    Chinese(Taiwan)/English(AE)
    #3 might be correct, but it doesn't convey the meaning you have in mind, I think.

    --.............you can promise your family and friends for sure.
    = .............you can certainly promise your family and friend.
     
  8. min300

    min300 Senior Member

    Tehran
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    Thanks again to both of you.
     
  9. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    Do you want the ones above to be rewritten more clearly? I mean, do you need the examples to include the words, "family and friends"?

    Otherwise, these work, too:

    1. If you take her advice, you can relax, knowing she'll make no promises she can't keep.

    2. If you take her advice, you can be sure she'll keep her promises.

    3. I'll make no promises I can't keep.

    4. Please believe that I'll keep my promise.

    5. If she makes a promise to her family and friends, you can trust her to keep it.

    6. A promise from me is a sure thing.


    AngelEyes
     
  10. Packard

    Packard Senior Member

    USA, English
    My answer would be:

    "You've got my word."


    That would be sufficient to guarantee that I would uphold the promise. There is no ambiguity; and the sentence is certain to be understood. (And look at all those saved keystrokes).
     
  11. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Excellent!

    In the context presented by the original poster, the sentence would be "You can give your family and friends your word."
     
  12. AngelEyes Senior Member

    English - United States
    Another variation of that which I'm familiar with is:

    You can give your family and friends your solemn promise/solemn oath.


    And Packard, there's also this variation on your really good suggestion:
    You have my word on that.

    AngelEyes
     
  13. min300

    min300 Senior Member

    Tehran
    Iran ,( Persian)Farsi
    Thank you very much. I think 'give solemn promise' and ' give your word' are the best to imply what I meant in the original sentences. Thank you again for your replies.:)
     

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