Sustainability

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by duurzam, Feb 23, 2014.

  1. duurzam New Member

    German
    Sustainability in all languages of the world: Contribute with your own language. Do we all share a common terminology for sustainability?
    Thanks ahead for the contribution to your language.

    Modern Hebrew
    Modern Hebrew: "קיימות" Kayamut.
    root: q-y-m, which revolves around existentiality. Note that [q] in Modern Hebrew is realized as [k].

    Though when speaking of something which is "sustainable" , we usually use Aramaic "bar kayyma" (literally "son of existence", meaning "one who has (the potential of) existence"). The root is obviously identical, it's just that "son" in Hebrew is "ben", while in Aramaic it's "bar".

    Greek
    «Βιωσιμότητα» [vi.osi'motita] (fem.) --> lit. existensiality < Classical v. «βίω» bíō --> to live (PIE *gʷeih₃w-, to live cf Skt. जीव (jivah), life; Lat. vīvere, to live; OCS жити (žiti), to live; Eng. quick; Ger. erquicken).
    In Environmentalism, «αειφορία» [a.ifo'ri.a] (fem.) --> lit. ever-endurance < Classical adj. «ἀειφόρος, -ος, -ον» ăeipʰórŏs (masc. & fem.), ăeipʰórŏn (neut.) --> lit. ever-green, metaph. ever-productive, ever-endurer, everlasting < compound, prefix and adv. «ἀεὶ» aeì (also «αἰεὶ» aieì) --> always (PIE *h₂ei-u-, time of living, well-being, vital force cf Lat. aevum, eternity, age, aeon > It./Sp./Por. evo, Rom. ev, Eng. medie(ae)val) + Classical v. «φέρω» pʰérō --> [I]to carry, bear, endure, provide (PIE *bʰer-, [I]to bear, carry cf Skt. भरति (bhArati); Lat. ferre; OCS бьрати > Russ. брать (brat); Proto-Germanic *beraną > Ger. Burde, Eng. bear).[/I][/I]


    Turkish
    sürdürülebilirlik
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014
  2. bazq Senior Member

    Hebrew
    Modern Hebrew: "קיימות" Kayamut.
    root: q-y-m, which revolves around existentiality. Note that [q] in Modern Hebrew is realized as [k].

    Though when speaking of something which is "sustainable" , we usually use Aramaic "bar kayyma" (literally "son of existence", meaning "one who has (the potential of) existence"). The root is obviously identical, it's just that "son" in Hebrew is "ben", while in Aramaic it's "bar".
     
  3. apmoy70

    apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    «Βιωσιμότητα» [vi.osi'motita] (fem.) --> lit. existensiality < Classical v. «βίω» bíō --> to live (PIE *gʷeih₃w-, to live cf Skt. जीव (jivah), life; Lat. vīvere, to live; OCS жити (žiti), to live; Eng. quick; Ger. erquicken).
    In Environmentalism, «αειφορία» [a.ifo'ri.a] (fem.) --> lit. ever-endurance < Classical adj. «ἀειφόρος, -ος, -ον» ăeipʰórŏs (masc. & fem.), ăeipʰórŏn (neut.) --> lit. ever-green, metaph. ever-productive, ever-endurer, everlasting < compound, prefix and adv. «ἀεὶ» aeì (also «αἰεὶ» aieì) --> always (PIE *h₂ei-u-, time of living, well-being, vital force cf Lat. aevum, eternity, age, aeon > It./Sp./Por. evo, Rom. ev, Eng. medie(ae)val) + Classical v. «φέρω» pʰérō --> to carry, bear, endure, provide (PIE *bʰer-, to bear, carry cf Skt. भरति (bhArati); Lat. ferre; OCS бьрати > Russ. брать (brat); Proto-Germanic *beraną > Ger. Burde, Eng. bear).
     
  4. learnerr Senior Member

    Russian
    What do you mean? The word 'sustainable' may be referred to lots of things.
     
  5. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    Turkish:
    sürdürülebilirlik
     
  6. duurzam New Member

    German
    ancalimon, apmoy70, bazq

    Thank you for your contribution!

    learnerr

    You are right. Sustainability can be used in different contexts. But I assume that for any language there is a tendency for a dominance of a certain context in which the term is used. I would like to do a further analysis on the roots of sustainability in different languages. But for a first overview I am interested in the literal meanings of sustainability in all potential languages.
     
  7. learnerr Senior Member

    Russian
    I still don't understand what you mean. The word 'sustainability' is an English word. How can it be used in languages other than English or have any literal meanings in those languages? For example, the verb 'sustain' (which is the base and the root of the adjective 'sustainable') has a lot of basic translations into Russian. The adjective 'sustainable' (able to maintain its condition, not changing) is usually presented (not translated!) as "устойчивый" (at-stand-able), from a verb устоять meaning 'not to fall after some trial, still stand after it' (there are also other verbs with this meaning in Russian, the root being the same, but prefixes differing), but I don't see what it gets us… This word sounds meaningless in some contexts where 'sustainable' is used.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2014
  8. bibax Senior Member

    Czech
    Czech:

    udržitelnost (= "holdability") from the verb udržeti (perf.), držeti (imperf.) = to hold, to keep, like in:

    They tried to keep him alive.
    to keep up with sb
    to hold sb's attention

    Latin:

    *sustentabilitas, *sustenibilitas (non-classical) from the verb sustentare, sustinere (sub + tenere) = under + to hold, to keep;

    Spanish:

    sustentabilidad, sostenibilidad < Latin;
     
  9. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    I deeply disagree with you, the hebrew equivalent for "sustain" is not related to ק-י-מ which is actually the equivalent of "exist"; we use
    א-ח-ז '-kh-z hold, grab, maintain, sustain
    נ-ש-א n-s-' to hold, carry
    ס-ב-ל s-b/v-l to sustain (pain), to maintain (pain) - to be able to control self pain, to carry
    ח-ז-ק kh-z-q to strengthen
    ת-מ-כ t-m-ch to support, to be supported
    א-ש-ש '-sh-sh to confirm

    the use of בר קימא is strictly for sustainability, and even then it can be replaced with some of the above.
     
  10. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    Norwegian:

    Bærekraft = Sustainability

    bære (verb "to carry") + kraft (noun "power")
     
  11. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I thought the term referred to ecology. Sustainability (meant to be long lasting and not causing too much impact on the future) is a buzzword in various contexts... In that case the Dutch would be 'duurzaam'.

    But you seem to refer to the general term that is way less common now. That would be draagbaar, houdbaar [carry/hold-able], I suppose.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  12. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    I'd be interested to hear more about these different opinions about the equivalent of 'sustainability' in Hebrew. This is more than just a misunderstanding, I guess, as I could imagine both refer to different aspects of sustainability. Could you not solve that problem by using the word in a sentence and see how you translate in different ways? It might be quite interesting, even for outsiders..
    But how do you analyse this word, Ancalimon?
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  13. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    sustainability is a thing that holds itself in reality (that is, it holds ground) - we use for that the words בר קיימא but for any other use of sustain we use the other roots, and we dont have to use בר קיימא, we can use some of the other roots instead.
    לדבר יש אחיזה במציאות
    ladavar yesh akhiza bametzi'ut
    (to the) thing has a hold in reality
    הדבר בר קיימא
    hadavar bar kay(a)ma
    the thing is sustained (foot in the ground)

    also, בר קיימא is the wrod we use for Sustainable development
     
  14. ancalimon Senior Member

    Istanbul
    Turkish
    I can try. :)

    sür: to drive, to herd, to drag, to continue
    sürdür: to make drive, to make herd, to make continue
    sürdürül: to be made driven, to be made herded, to be made continued
    sürdürülebil: to be able to be made driven, to be able to be made herded, to be able to be made continued
    sürdürülebilir: (it) is able to be made continued
    sürdürülebilirlik: the situation in which (it) is able to be made continued.

    That's the best I can do. Sorry for the mistakes.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  15. mataripis

    mataripis Senior Member

    for me it means "there is enough for someone to go on" and my Tagalog word for Sustainability is "Kasapatan". It has root word "Sapat"(enough) and i am thinking if it has relation to the word "Apat" (four) , a shape with equal sides (square) forming a balance force that support one another.
     
  16. Gavril Senior Member

    English, USA
    Slovene
    obnovljiv "sustainable, renewable (resource, etc.)" < obnavljati "to renew" < ob- "at" + nov- "new"
    trajnosten "sustainable (resource, etc.)" < trajnost "durability" < trajen "durable" / trajati "to last"
     
  17. Словеса Senior Member

    Русский
    In Russian, both yes and no, we may have an expression for "sustainable development", but it is not widely known and circulated, maybe because the usual translation ("устойчивое развитие") is so weird on many counts and means nothing. The term, along with the concept, did not pass through the linguistic barrier… The question is poorly formulated, though: is it about sustainability or sustainable development? These are very different things. We have no way to know what the answers to come are about.
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2014
  18. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    That gives us quite an interesting survey of Turkish word formation, thanks a lot ! I suppose 'herding' here refers to keeping, preserving, protecting, doesn't it?
     
  19. ahmedcowon Senior Member

    In Arabic:

    Sustainability = استدامة /istidāma/

    The root is دوم /d-w-m/ (to last)
     
  20. arielipi Senior Member

    Israel
    Hebrew
    I guess you can use it that way in hebrew (לעמוד la'amod it bears the same meaning as to last, to withstand, to stand, to hold)
    root ע-מ-ד '-m-d
    עמידה amida sustain
    עמידה בפרץ amida baperetz means to make a stand, to not follow and usually oppose the herd while its doing bad things (for instance if everyone is cursing someone and you stand up for him).
     
  21. OneStroke Senior Member

    Hong Kong, China
    Chinese - Cantonese (HK)
    Chinese: 可持續性 kěchíxùxìng

    It's an extremely annoying, westernised word that gets on my nerve, but it's a necessary evil because there's no other equivalent.
     
  22. Holger2014 Senior Member

    German
    German: Nachhaltigkeit (a very broad term, nowadays often used with regards to ecologic issues)
     
  23. franknagy

    franknagy Senior Member

    Let me derive it step by step in Hungarian just like Ancalimon did it in Turkish language.
    fenn = on top
    tart = hold
    -hat/het- = able to, can, may
    -ható = able
    -ság/ség = -ness

    Positive

    Tart = he/she holds (verb. 3rd person singular)
    Tarthat = he/she can to hold (verb. with auxiliary 3rd person singular)
    Tartható = it may be fulfilled (e. g. a deadline)
    Fenntart = it sustains (verb. 3rd person singular)
    Fenntartható = sustainable (adjective)
    Fenntarthatóság = sustainability.

    ...
    Negative
    Ez nem tartható fenn. = It can be sustained.
    tarthatatlan = untenable
    tarthatatlanság = indefensibility
    fenntarthatatlan = unsustainable
    fenntarthatatlanság = unsustainability

    Please comrades, continue the thread with the negative phrases.
     

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