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Swedish: översöttning

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by FreeDom Fighter, Mar 15, 2014.

  1. FreeDom Fighter Junior Member

    Sweden
    Arabic
    Hello everybody!
    I came across a sentence while I was reading a story and translating it into English.
    '' Det blev alldeles tyst i tehuset ''
    Which of these translations are correct? Or if you can suggest a better correction.

    - It was really silent in the tea house.
    - Silence overran in the tea house.
    - Silence prevailed (in) the tea house.
    - Other: ?


    And thanks a lot in advance.
     
  2. Jakobo3 New Member

    Swedish
    It became totaly silent in the tea house
     
  3. MattiasNYC Senior Member

    New York
    Swedish
    I would write "It got totally silent..."
     
  4. Andreas24524 Junior Member

    "The tea house went completely silent" is what I would use, I think. (Although it depends on the context, of course)
     
  5. MattiasNYC Senior Member

    New York
    Swedish
    I think your translation is better Andreas.

    Btw, it's "översättning".
     
  6. DerFrosch

    DerFrosch Senior Member

    I hate to be negative, but that's just not a good translation. You'll hear become used for bli by students in classrooms all over Sweden, because become is the first word you'll find in a dictionary when looking up bli. But they are definitely not always interchangeable, not in this case, for example. It depends very much on the context, sometimes it may be necessary to rephrase the sentence completely.

    Mattias' try works, Andreas' suggestion is good. If I actually were to translate the story into English though, I think I wouldn't even try to find an equivalent phrase. Instead I think I would explain why it went silent. "Everyone in the tea house stopped talking" for example, or whatever would fit in the context. That's how most English speakers would describe the situation, I believe.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2014
  7. Pauline GFG

    Pauline GFG Senior Member

    Central France
    English UK
    My suggestion: "The tea house fell silent."
    That's brief and dramatic. "Totally" or "completely" don't add anything.
     

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