Swedish: Pronunciation of Tommy Söderberg

Discussion in 'Nordic Languages' started by PiotrR, Mar 21, 2014.

  1. PiotrR Junior Member

    Chinese (Mandarin)
    Hello. How do you pronounce Tommy Söderberg? Is it something like this?
    X-SAMPA: /tU_Fmmy: s2:_Fd@rbE_Frj/
    IPA: /tʊ̂mmyː sø̂ːdərbɛ̂rj/

    Or should it be /tO_Fmmy:/ /tɔ̂mmyː/? /ʊ/ is the normal value of short <o> in Swedish, but then in this recording Tommy sounds as if it was pronounced with /ɔ/, a short <å>.
     
  2. Tjahzi

    Tjahzi Senior Member

    Umeå, Sweden
    Swedish (Göteborg)
    Indeed. Since the historical realization of /o/ was [o] (like in most other languages), there are many instances of Swedish /o/ being realized as /å/. I'd pronounce it ['tʰɔmːʏ 'søːdərbɛrj].
     
  3. PiotrR Junior Member

    Chinese (Mandarin)
    Thanks!

    The final vowel of Tommy in the recording indeed sounds unusually lax to be /yː/, but I thought /ʏ/ must be followed by a consonant. Unless it doesn't apply to this word...

    And would you pronounce both words with an acute accent? That's how I read your transcription. The guy on the recording seems to use the grave (double falling in his case) accent in the surname, but it's indeed acute (single falling in his case) in the first name.
     
  4. Tjahzi

    Tjahzi Senior Member

    Umeå, Sweden
    Swedish (Göteborg)
    It doesn't have to be followed by a consonant if the syllable is unstressed (and theoretically, not necessarily even in stressed ones either).

    As for accents, I rarely include them in my transcriptions for since they are hardly ever phonemic and as such, also tend ti vary between speakers/dialects. That said, yes, I believe that I prefer acute accent on both Tommy and Söderberg.
     
  5. PiotrR Junior Member

    Chinese (Mandarin)
    Got it, thanks.

    You mean cases like anden / anden? I admit that putting falling tone diacritics on vowels was a waste of time, I just wasn't sure whether stress marks convey everything (they don't in the tonal variety of standard Slovene.) I learnt that they do, at least phonemically.

    So there seems to be a dialectal variation with regards to the surname. Interesting!
     
  6. Tjahzi

    Tjahzi Senior Member

    Umeå, Sweden
    Swedish (Göteborg)
    Pitch accent is complicated. Very complicated. The main reason for advising you not to bother with it altogether is that it's indeed only phonemic when distinguishing between certain minimal pairs, like anden and anden. (In fact, the majority of these pairs consist of two nouns of which the one is the other+/e/.) Rather, pitch accent is an innate trait of a word and depends on syllable count (which is why these pairs end up with different patterns) and comes naturally to native speakers (and hardly ever to second language learners) on a subconscious level. However, it also differs between dialects. While grammar as well as vocabulary is very consistent, dialects can have very different stress/intonation patterns (some even render the above mentioned pairs homophones) and as such, in addition to being unnecessary information, pitch accent is not consistent.

    So, to be more accurate in my remark, it's pitch accent, rather than the actual realization of the name Söderberg, that differs between dialects.
     

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