[syntax] compound or postponed adjective?

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by beri, Jul 8, 2005.

  1. beri Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    Le type de ferro-sulfate utilisé (forme hepta-hydratée) est une poudre présentant une forte sensibilité à l’humidité

    The kind of ferrous sulphate that is used (an hepta-hydrated form) is a powder that is very sensitive to humidity

    What I would like to know is:
    - could I put "a humidity-sensitive powder" ?
    - if not, would "a powder very sensitive to humidity" work?

    I would like to clear my sentence, since I have two "that is" in it
    Tenkyu :p
     
  2. Amityville

    Amityville Senior Member

    France
    English UK
    I suggest: "The kind of ferrous sulphate used (a hepta-hydrated form) is a powder that is very susceptible to dampness."
    I have changed humidity to dampness, can't say why.
     
  3. Aupick

    Aupick Senior Member

    Strasbourg, France
    UK, English
    I'd get rid of the first one:

    The kind of ferrous sulphate used (a hepta-hydrated form) is a powder that is very sensitive to humidity.

    'a humidity-sensitive powder' is a bit of a mouthful, and loses the 'very'.
    'a powder very sensitive to humidity' just doesn't sound quite right to me (can't quite say why).
     
  4. Eddie

    Eddie Senior Member

    Nassau County, NY
    USA - English
    Hi, Beri.

    The use of relative pronouns is more of a requirement in languages other than English. In your sentence, you can omit the first relative pronoun, or if you want to keep it, substitute a different relative pronoun in the latter part of the sentence:

    Your choices:

    1)
    The kind of ferrous sulphate used (an hepta-hydrated form) is a powder very sensitive to humidity.

    2)
    The kind of ferrous sulphate that is used (an hepta-hydrated form) is a powder which is very sensitive to humidity.

    3)
    The kind of ferrous sulphate which is used (an hepta-hydrated form) is a powder that is very sensitive to humidity.

    4)
    The kind of ferrous sulphate used (an hepta-hydrated form) is a humidity-sensitive powder.

    While the procedure used in #4 (compound adjective form) is very popular in English, in this particular sentence, it just doesn't have the right sound; but it is a viable choice.

    Doudou


     
  5. beri Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    picko > I didn't write "very" but I didn't mean to skip it ;)
    Thanks to all, I'll make my choice
     
  6. Amityville

    Amityville Senior Member

    France
    English UK
    Everyone else has stuck with sensitive - don't you think susceptible is better for an inanimate thing ? I'm not sure anymore...but at first bite I was.
     
  7. Aupick

    Aupick Senior Member

    Strasbourg, France
    UK, English
    To me they're a little different. I think of susceptible to as being like liable to or prone to, as if humidity is a disease or condition that you or ferrous sulphate can come down with if you're not careful. It suggests that, all being well, there won't be any humidity, but you'd better be careful because it could strike the ferrous sulphate at any moment.

    Sensitive to suggests that changes in humidity levels will affect the ferrous sulphate. It suggests that the ferrous sulphate is exposed to a certain level of humidity that in itself is not harmful, although fluctuations might be.

    That's how my gut sees it, anyway.
     
  8. josephboen

    josephboen Senior Member

    Strasbourg, France
    US - American English
    My suggestion to the French phrase:

    Le type de ferro-sulfate utilisé (forme hepta-hydratée) est une poudre présentant une forte sensibilité à l’humidité

    is:

    The type of ferrous sulphate used (an hepta-hydrated form) is a powder with a high sensitivity to humidity.
     
  9. Amityville

    Amityville Senior Member

    France
    English UK
    I can appreciate your reasoning, Aupick, and will bow to the majority verdict, but my gut says no! Sensitive is concerned with feeling which cement isn't known for. There is another word flitting about my peripheral vision - can't quite get hold of it..... had a cursory look on the net but got nowhere except to find that 'susceptive' is used too but that's definitely out.
     
  10. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    "Hydrosensitive" ferait peut-être ton bonheur. Vérifie donc avec Google.
     
  11. Eddie

    Eddie Senior Member

    Nassau County, NY
    USA - English
    Génial, Gil! A mon avis ça fait vraiment l'affaire.
     
  12. Gil Senior Member

    Français, Canada
    :eek:Thanks. I hope you're right.:D
     
  13. beri Senior Member

    Paris
    France
    roflllllllllll :D :D :D
    Plutôt "hygrosensitive", non?

    To all,
    - if you're still fighting for convincing me, it's ok, I've handed the document in ;) with "susceptible". Apparently I've been wrong, I'll see if the person can change it.
    - if you're fighting for each other's conviction, please carry on :bow:
    - thank you for the passion you have shown and for your help :)
     
  14. Amityville

    Amityville Senior Member

    France
    English UK
    No, beri, I'm still with susceptible. Stet !
     
  15. Kelly B

    Kelly B Senior Member

    USA English
    I think either one is unobjectionable, for what it's worth.
     

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