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Szanowni Państwo

Discussion in 'Polski (Polish)' started by wolfrau, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. wolfrau

    wolfrau New Member

    Warsaw
    Polish
    Do we also translate it as "ladies and gentlemen" in e-mails? For example by writing a letter of application. How do we start, when we don't know a name of the contact person?
     
  2. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Hi,

    Depending on how you want to start your e-mail, you can begin it with:
    Dear Sirs,
    We have received...

    Dear Sir,
    We have received...

    Dear Sir/Madam,
    We have received...

    Dear Madam,
    We have received...

    To end such an e-mail you usually use
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  3. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    'Szanowni Państwo' usually translates into English as 'Dear Sir or Madam'.
    As is customary on such occasions, when the recipient is unknown, we end the letter with 'Yours faithfully'.

    By the way, you could have just as well written in Polish -- it's a Polish section of the forum after all, and the fact that your question deals with English is of little importance, I think. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  4. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    I have never seen Yours faithfully used in a letter. It's sounds archaic. Sincerely is the most common ending. Salutations and endings are becoming less and less popular in correspondence. One omits the salutation and just starts with the first sentence.

    Dear Sirs is dated, too. The best salutation, if you must use one, is To Whom It May Concern.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  5. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
  6. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    All these sound like the 1950s.
     
  7. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    Thank you, NotNow. I think I'll consider using your suggestions next time I'm writing a formal e-mail/letter.
     
  8. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    But first I'd suggest that you confront NotNow's opinion with those of other native speakers of English. The one I've just spoken to says that the suggesteded valedictions are alive and well and kicking. :)
     
  9. NotNow Senior Member

    English
    I think Thomas is being sarcastic
     
  10. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    I am not. I meant what I wrote in earnest, especially if I write to someone from the US.

    Dreamlike, which English variety does the person you talked to speak?
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  11. LeTasmanien

    LeTasmanien Senior Member

    Gmina Karczew, Poland
    English British
    I agree "Yours faithfully" is a bit archaic these days.
    "Yours sincerely" is still used but quite commonly now people often sign off with simply "Regards".
    Wolfrau has given the example of a letter of application (for a job/position).
    In this instance to begin with "to whom it may concern" would be inappropriate.
    The writer can be sure that the application will be received by someone who of course will not feel that the application does not "concern" them.

    I have received many applications for various positions over the years and typically they will commence with
    "Dear Sir" or even "Dear Phil" and not "Dear Sir or Madam" as most of the time the applicant knows the name of the person to whom he/she is addressing the application.

    On the other hand "to whom it may concern" can be used, and often is, to begin a personal reference written by a third party.
    This is becase the writer has no idea who the reader/s may be.

    Cheers
    Phil.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2013
  12. LilianaB Senior Member

    US New York
    Lithuanian
    I have seen Faithfully yours, but really used by an attorney who would have been about ninety now, however, Truly yours is still used in legal correspondence. To Whom It May Concern may sound rude, or at least very impersonal, like a standard letter mailed to hundreds of people, that does not really mean that much, if used in a context for which it is not mean. Dear Sir/Madam would be the best choice, in my opinion, at least in AE.
     
  13. dreamlike

    dreamlike Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    It's a Pole born to an English father, who speaks impeccable RP, and so does he, I presume. :) If you ask around, you'll find the same.
     

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