Taco (pool, billiards)

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by nmb882003, Jun 17, 2010.

  1. nmb882003

    nmb882003 Junior Member

    Chesterfield, Derbyshire, UK
    English - England
    Hi,

    A slightly strange query, this one...

    I was talking to a Canarian friend of mine earlier today about the game of pool, and I asked her what words the Spanish use for 'cue' and 'chalk'.

    I suggested 'palo' and 'tiza' and she told me that 'palo' was correct, but that 'chalk' = 'taco'.

    Imagine my surprise therefore when I looked on WR and found that 'taco' in Spanish actually means 'cue'.

    The reason I am concerned is because this is not the first time that she has told me words in Spanish that later appear to have a completely different meaning. I'm starting to wonder if she's messing with my mind! Is it possible that people in the Canaries use 'taco' to mean 'chalk' and 'palo' for 'cue'?

    Or is it perhaps time to find myself a new native speaker?

    Regards

    nmb882003
     
  2. JB

    JB Senior Member

    Santa Monica, CA, EEUU
    English (AE)
    I don't know, and hope a native speaker will have an answer for you, but I wonder if "taco" for her refers to the container in which chalk for cue sticks is held, and if she would use "taco" or "tiza" for chalk on a blackboard.
     
  3. aldonzalorenzo

    aldonzalorenzo Senior Member

    Español
    I know very little about pool, but I think it´s clear we call them "taco" and "tiza". They are in the DRAE:
    taco. 6. m. Vara de madera dura, pulimentada, como de metro y medio de largo, más gruesa por un extremo que por el otro y con la cual se impelen las bolas del billar y de los trucos.
    tiza.3. f. Compuesto de yeso y greda que se usa en el juego de billar para frotar la suela de los tacos a fin de que no resbalen al dar en las bolas.

    I don´t think it´ll change that much in the Canary Islands (someone from there could help); I guess it´s just that your friend doesn´t know anything about pool :).

    I don´t think so.
     
  4. ch4rl1

    ch4rl1 Senior Member

    Spanish - Castilla y León
    Soy de la península, juego al billar y se utiliza indistintamente taco y tiza ;)
     
  5. gatogab Senior Member

    Español
  6. ch4rl1

    ch4rl1 Senior Member

    Spanish - Castilla y León
    Ahora que lo dice gatogab, también se le llama a la goma de atrás taco
     
  7. Hella

    Hella Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spanish - Spain
    So it seems that you might need "to find yourself a new native speaker"... :p
     
  8. gatogab Senior Member

    Español
    En italiano existe un modo para llamar a la tranquilidad en un momento de agitación que, traducido, se lee: "calma y tiza".
    Es la imagen del jugador de billar que estudia el golpe mientras rotea la tiza en la punta del taco.:cool:
     
  9. nmb882003

    nmb882003 Junior Member

    Chesterfield, Derbyshire, UK
    English - England
    Hi all,

    Thanks for the input.

    So...it's clear that a pool cue in Spain is always a 'taco' and the chalk is always 'tiza' :)

    I think jbruceismay actually hit the nail on the head with his reply, as 'taco' apparently can also mean a small cube of a particular substance, and if you search on Google for 'taco de tiza' there are lots of examples of Spanish speakers using this to refer to the chalk used in pool.

    I guess it's just bad luck on my part that the word she uses for 'chalk' is the same one that most speakers use for 'cue'.

    But yeah... I'm sure she knows nothing about pool, either way :D

    Regards

    nmb882003
     
  10. dexterciyo

    dexterciyo Senior Member

    Londres
    Español - Canarias
    I am not an expert on pool here either, so I could be wrong.

    I have always called taco the billiard chalk you apply to the tip of the cue. Tiza is also said, so I do not know why your friend corrected you.

    However, I have never heard someone calling the cue taco — it is called palo, as you said.
     
  11. nmb882003

    nmb882003 Junior Member

    Chesterfield, Derbyshire, UK
    English - England
    Hi,

    Dexterciyo, I see you're based in the Canaries, so I guess in many ways you're the person best qualified to answer my question.

    It would appear then that it's just a regional variation - in the Canaries you say 'palo' and 'taco' whereas in the Peninsula they would sooner use 'taco' and 'tiza'.

    I can see there being a spot of confusion when Spaniards from the Peninsula go on their holidays to the Canaries and play pool there! :D

    Many thanks

    nmb882003
     
  12. Agró

    Agró Senior Member

    High Navarre
    Spanish-Navarre
    cue: taco (más raramente, palo)
    chalk: tiza (nunca taco)

    Toda la vida ha sido así, aquí.
     
  13. aldonzalorenzo

    aldonzalorenzo Senior Member

    Español
    Sí, así lo conocía yo. Pero (1 hora menos) en Canarias parece que lo llaman distinto. Curioso...
     
  14. dexterciyo

    dexterciyo Senior Member

    Londres
    Español - Canarias

    I have learnt something new today. ;)
     
  15. Juan Jacob Vilalta

    Juan Jacob Vilalta Senior Member

    México
    Español/Francés
    Con muchísima más razón se llama también así en México: taco (cue). :)

    Tiza, en cambio, se llama gis.
     

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