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tapenade d'olives noires/olive noire

Discussion in 'French-English Vocabulary / Vocabulaire Français-Anglais' started by fzc, Aug 1, 2008.

  1. fzc Junior Member

    english
    hope im in the right forum here.
    so which is it...i'm thinking the plural.
    thanks
     
  2. anangelaway

    anangelaway Senior Member

    Toulouse
    French
  3. tilt

    tilt Senior Member

    Nord-Isère, France
    French French
    I beg to disagree.
    Both are possible in fact, depending whether you consider olives as fruits (des olives) or an uncountable ingredient (de l'olive).
    The slight difference of meaning it implies doesn't really matter, yet, so you can use the spelling you want.

    [...]
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2010
  4. ..ed.. Senior Member

    Calabria
    Italian
    Is "Tapenade rouge aux tomates séchées" right?Is the term TAPENADE good to talk about different kinds of vegetable creams?
    Tapenade d'olives noires
    Tapenade d'olives vertes
    Tapenade d'olives noires aux anchois et aux câpres
    Tapenade rouge aux anchois et aux câpres
     
  5. sarmate Junior Member

    French - France
    Olive is never uncountable in French.
    So, tapenade d'olives noires, no doubt about it.
     
  6. sarmate Junior Member

    French - France
    Strictly speaking, no. Tapenade comes from the provençal "tapeno", which means caper; it refers to the very specific regional recipe including olives, anchovy and capers.

    But it has drifted from the original sense, to include similar recipespastes, no matter whether they include all three key ingredients. Olive pastes only, tapenade rouge" with sun-dried tomatoes instead of olives...

    More recently, with tapenade becoming very fashionable, the sense has been used even wider, or rather abused: I've seen in Belgium a place serving so-called "tapenade de carottes", which had nothing to do (neither in principle not in taste!) with what you can expect from tapenade!
     
  7. NemoNobody

    NemoNobody Senior Member

    France métropolitaine
    French - France
    I agree with Sarmate.
     
  8. ..ed.. Senior Member

    Calabria
    Italian
    So do you think that it is not adequate to use for the labels of products to sell in France? I mean, could it confuse the customer?
     
  9. sarmate Junior Member

    French - France
    for which products?
    for dried tomatoes, I think it's acceptable.
    [...]
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2010
  10. NemoNobody

    NemoNobody Senior Member

    France métropolitaine
    French - France
    As far as I am concerned, I have never seen the word "tapenade" used in France for anything else than "olives" (but I may be mistaken).
    The usual word for other ingredients is "purée de ..." : "purée de tomates" for "smashed tomatoes", etc.
     
  11. ..ed.. Senior Member

    Calabria
    Italian
    :)

    1-Dried tomatoes cream in olive oil
    2-Black olives cream in olive oil
    3-Green olives cream in olive oil
    4-Black olives cream with anchovies and capers in olive oil
    5-Dried tomatoes cream with anchovies and capers in olive oil

    A French native speakers tranlated them for me as follows:
    1- Tapenade rouge aux tomates séchées
    2-Tapenade d'olives noires
    3-Tapenade d'olives vertes
    4-Tapenade d'olives noires aux anchois et aux câpres
    5-Tapenade rouge aux anchois et aux câpres

    But I need to be sure that (even it is common to use this term in French language) it doesn't give me some problems in selling the products I mentioned. I have to be clear with the names!
     
  12. sarmate Junior Member

    French - France
    Yes you can, the only doubt might be with the red ones, but as long as its dried tomatoes, and prepared in this traditional way, it's more explaining than confusing.

    Purée would bring in quite different connotations.

    Tapenade is not a protected legal term.

    (Your post reminds me it's lunch time, btw!)
     
  13. cerisebleue New Member

    Glasgow
    French
  14. Bastoune Senior Member

    Rio de Janeiro, Brasil
    French & English - Canada
    Hmmmm.... pourquoi ne dit-on pas "tapenade aux olives noires" ?

    Moi aussi, je dirai "tapenade d'olives noires" mais je ne saurais pas expliquer pourquoi on ne dirait pas "aux" dans ce cas tandis qu'on dirait "tapenade aux tomates séchées".
     
  15. NemoNobody

    NemoNobody Senior Member

    France métropolitaine
    French - France
    Quand on dit "quelque-chose de quelque-chose-d'autre", cela signifie que l'ingrédient principal/unique de "quelque-chose" est "quelque-chose-d'autre".

    Quand on dit "quelque-chose à quelque-chose-d'autre", cela signifie que l'ingrédient principal de "quelque-chose" n'est pas spécifié, mais que "quelque-chose" contient en plus "quelque-chose-d'autre".

    Dans le cas d'espèce, "tapenade d'olives noires" signifie que l'ingrédient principal est "olives noires", tandis que "tapenade aux tomates séchées" signifie que l'ingédient principal n'est pas spécifié (mais on sait qu'il s'agit habituellement d'olives), mais qu'il y a en plus des "tomates séchées" ajoutées.
     

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