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  1. cremba Senior Member

    Hebrew, Israel
    Hola,

    que es una tarada?

    ("...porque solo a un hortera al que le gustan Los Secretos y a una tarada como yo le podia gustar Prince, o eso decia Tania.")

    Lo siento, no tengo accentos!
     
  2. Doncelle Junior Member

    California
    Spanish / USA
    Alguna vez lei esa palabra y tambien me causo curiosidad, encontre que significa " cretino (a) ", o algo que esta dañado.
    Espero te sirva mi sugerencia .

    Saludos :)
     
  3. diegodbs

    diegodbs Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spain-Spanish
    tarado, da.(Del part. de tarar).1. adj. Que padece tara física o psíquica.2. adj. Tonto, bobo, alocado. U. t. c. s.


    Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados
     
  4. cremba Senior Member

    Hebrew, Israel
    Gracias! Muy amable.
     
  5. Eugin

    Eugin Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina (Spanish)
    yes, you can translate it as: a stupid girl

    if it were a boy: tarado
     
  6. yonosenada

    yonosenada Senior Member

    Southern Appalachia
    English-Southern American
    I think the closest English translation (albeit a little less politically correct in English) would be retard.

    IE:

    Don't be such a retard bobby, ask her to dance.

    Dude, you are such a 'tard. I can't believe you stuck that firecracker in you own toilet!
     
  7. clotimer

    clotimer Senior Member

    Lost
    Spanish-Spain
    I think you re givin a very bad connotation to the word, which is not actually real... what I mean is you can say tarada as in a smooth way, (cariñoso) eg if i say to a friend hola tarada!!! i am just being friendly:^^
    do I explain myself?
     
  8. Lulux Senior Member

    Mexico
    Español y México
    No estoy de acuerdo, tarada es, al menos en México, es una persona del sexo femenino que es tonta, boba, que no entiende algo o que no puede hacer algo que para la mayoría es simple. Para nada el algo cariñoso. Saludos
     
  9. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hello:
    I think it is best to use just "silly". Tania is not implying that this girl is retarded, but that she has very bad taste.
    Alexa
     
  10. Fernando Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spain, Spanish
    The word is (per se) very offensive and, as said before, very close to "retard". Possibly for young girls can be used as an affection name, but the same can be said of almost every insult.
     
  11. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hello:
    I'm afraid not. I wouldn't dare say "hola tarada" to any friend. And none of my acquaintance would do it either. It would be, to say the least, very impolite, and the person so addressed would feel insulted.
    Alexa
     
  12. maranhata New Member

    UK
    Castellano Argentina
    Cremba,

    I think this is a case of regional variations in the use of the word. In Argentina, for instance, it could be insulting, or just another word used by teenagers which may or may not keep the meaning. We also say 'boludo', probably in the same way Chileans say 'huevon' (not sure) or the Greeks 'malaka' (which means 'wanker'). In your quote though, it is quite emphatic, I would say something like that if I am very angry at my stupidity. I personally like the word and use it a lot, as it is very expressive.

    Hope this helps another bit.
     
  13. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hello:
    I'm not quite sure it's a regional variation. The first one to suggest "tarada" could be used as a nice word was Clotimer, who is a native of Spain. And so am I, and Fernando, and for both of us is an insult.
    And, if I remember rightly, for a Mexican "tarada" is highly insulting too. So, Cremba, to keep on the safe side: do not use "tarada" to say hello to a friend.
    Alexa
     
  14. susanb

    susanb Senior Member

    Catalan-Catalonia
    I wouldn't use it either:)
     
  15. maranhata New Member

    UK
    Castellano Argentina
    Sorry for the existence of regional variations: in Argentina we DO say tarada sometimes as a greeting.
     
  16. Arana_VB Senior Member

    Valencia
    Spanish/Catalan - Spain
    Hola a todos,

    Veo que hay disparidad de criterios... Well, I'm going to give my explanation in english, so it can be useful for me too.

    The sentence Cremba is quoting is an Spanish sentence (it talks about the Spanish nineties group Los Secretos), so the meaning we give to "tarada" must be the spanish meaning.

    In fact, as Alexa says, the word is referring to the bad taste of the girl that likes Prince. So the translation could be silly.
    But, in other cases, tarada can mean "retard", too. That's way a "tara" it's a fault or a bad mark.

    Going further, in Spain we use tara o tarada to talk about clothes which have little defaults so that they can't be sold with the same price of the other clothes and they are cheaper. In fact, there are here in Spain shops which only sell clothes with "tara" or default. When I was younger, I used to buy in one of these shops my Levi's jeans, so they were moooore cheaper.

    At last, I'd like to say that the use of "insulting words" with close friends in a smooth way is very common in Spain. In this case is very important the way you say the word, the entonation, I mean, and, obviously, the knowledge of this use between both speakers, so Clotimer is not being incorrect with her explanation.

    I hope I've been useful.
     
  17. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain

    I am really sorry if you took my comment as a personal attack. But it is not a regional variation, but, as you said yourself, just teenage slang.
    Alexa
     
  18. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hola:
    Sí que lo es; pero los insultos que se pueden tomar como nombres cariñosos varían en cada región, cada provincia, cada ciudad, cada grupo de hablantes, por lo que no creo que se puedan considerar como norma por muy extendido que esté su uso en un determinado lugar.
    Alexa
     
  19. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    tarada--> stupid, idiot
     
  20. maranhata New Member

    UK
    Castellano Argentina
    Hola a todos otra vez.
    Apologies to AlexaCohen for the misunderstanding. Let’s see if I can make my point more clearly this time. Following on from AranaVB’s very helpful intervention, I think the use of ‘tarada’ by young people in urban contexts in Argentina is an age-group variation within a regional variation. Clearly the Spanish spoken in Argentina is different from the one spoken in other places. Even within a country there are sometimes wide variations. While the use of an insulting word with non-insulting meanings may be strange or shocking, I mentioned ‘boludo’, ‘huevon’ and ‘malaka’ as other examples. I remember now ‘chocho’ from Estepona, Spain, which I find very funny and so use sometimes when I visit. I do not think that the use of these words, which thereby acquire new meanings, can be ‘regulated’, so we cannot talk about a ‘norm’, in the way we speak of ‘grammar rules’. The language is made up by the people that use it and transform it every day in their own particular contexts making it ‘yield’ new meanings, so to speak. And this is the way all languages have come to be what they are: we only need to take a look at the literature, contemporary and comparative, to see that. That is the basis of my reaction, AlexaCohen. Sorry if I was rough. When I was studying linguistics, I was asked to give all the possible meanings of a particular word. And the really interesting thing was finding out those that did not appear in the dictionary, which, understandably, always lags behind. Now I think that the beautiful thing about a forum like this is that precisely because it gathers real speakers from all parts of the world, one gets an incomparably vaster number of entries than in any possible dictionary, plus the descriptions of actual users in the lived language. A luxury that, when I was trying to study English in Argentina, where ordinary English students had little chances of meeting native English speakers, was very rare.
    I hope this clarifies my point.
     
  21. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    Actually i am from Argentina, and you can rely on my definition of the word tarada, that is the way we use it in Argentina :)
     
  22. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hello:
    I agree with you, Maranhata, up to a certain point. But what I was trying to say is that although insults may be used as pet words, their use differs so widely that it is never safe to use them, even when you are in the same country and using your own language.
    Just one instance:
    Although "Chocho" and "Picha" are so common in the Cádiz area that you can find them written on the doors of the public loos, anywhere else in Spain or even in Andalucía (and Cádiz is part of the Andalucía region) if you call a woman a "cunt" you will probably get insulted back, and the people who hear you will think you are quite bad mannered. And the word may be of common use, but it is still considered bad taste to use it. To say nothing of what a Spanish male will say if a young woman calls him a "prick".
    I am sorry, too, for the misunderstanding.
    Alexa
     
  23. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    Well chocho/a in Argentina means to be very happy :). Picha doesnt exist in Argentina
     
  24. Basenjigirl Senior Member

    English, USA
    So does tarada = bimbo (in English)?
     
  25. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hello:
    I know. I'm a super fan of les Luthiers.
    Alexa
     
  26. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    I dont know what bimbo means in English. But in Argentina, tarada means to be an idiot, a stupid, a retarded, it is insult as you can see.
     
  27. Basenjigirl Senior Member

    English, USA
    bimbo = Paris Hilton, Pamela Anderson, Anna Nicole Smith.
     
  28. alexacohen

    alexacohen Senior Member

    Santiago de Compostela
    Spanish. Spain
    Hello:
    Well, they would be "bollitos" in Spanish, pretty females with little brain.
    Alexa
     
  29. Malevo

    Malevo Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Argentina, Spanish
    tambien la palabra "maraca" se traduce como "maricon"
     
  30. mariente Senior Member

    Buenos Aires
    Español, Argentina (somewhere in the planet Urban)
    Ya tenés la defininción de tu palabra entonces :)
     
  31. Eayala New Member

    Spain; Spanish
    Tarada means to be a person retarded. Also it is an insult.
     
  32. duejcm New Member

    Australia
    Spanish
    I would say "tarado/a" could be tell to a friend as a joke in a certain context and sounds less "strong" than "loco/a", but in any case it is quite a risky word and you have to know who you tell to and be sure that both have a extremely good knowledge of spanish and its connotations and a good sense of humour.
     

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