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Te crepitus pedit, nimium si ventre retentes

Discussion in 'Lingua Latina (Latin)' started by Spharadi, Aug 17, 2012.

  1. Spharadi Senior Member

    Tel-Aviv
    Spanish
    I found this epigram quoted at the beginning of a sonnet by the Spanish poet Francisco de Quevedo. Is the author of this epigram Martial or Horace? Unfortunately I am unable to translate it. Any help will be highly appreciated.
    Encontré este epigrama (ignoro si es de Horacio o Marcial) encabezando un soneto de F. de Quevedo. Agradeceré mucho si alguien quiere ayudarme con la traducción.

    Te crepitus pedit, nimium si ventre retentes.
    Te proprere emissus servat item crepitus.
    Si crepitus servare potes et perdere, ninquid (is this a correct Latin word?)
    Terrificis crepitus reqibus (and this one?) aequa potesti?
     
  2. CapnPrep Senior Member

    France
    AmE
    Neither: it's Thomas More.
     
  3. Hamlet2508 Senior Member

    English
    As far as I can tell it's an epigram (faintly reminiscent of Martial) by Sir Thomas More based on a translation of a Greek epigram by Nicarchus.

    As for the Latin text (mind you , there might be several versions , especially of the last line)


    In efflatum ventris (On breaking wind)


    Te crepitus perdit, nimium si ventre retentes.

    Te propere emissus servat item crepitus.

    Si crepitus servare potest et perdere, numquid

    Terrificis crepitus regibus aequa potest?


    As for the translation

    Wind, if you keep it in your stomach for too long, kills (will kill) you,

    At the same time, if properly let out , it saves (will save) you.

    If wind can save and kill you , doesn't wind achieve the same as

    terrifying kings?

    Hope this helped.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2012
  4. Spharadi Senior Member

    Tel-Aviv
    Spanish
    Thank you very much Hamlet2508 !
     
  5. Hamlet2508 Senior Member

    English
    You are most welcome.
     

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