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Te echo mucho de menos.

Discussion in 'Spanish-English Vocabulary / Vocabulario Español-Inglés' started by hannafop, Jul 28, 2004.

  1. hannafop New Member

    UK ENGLISH
    Just received a text which this phase in itmcan't work it out... Help, please.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  2. Psydmike New Member

    USA - English
    Well "te echo de menos" means I miss you. Obviously this is one of those don't translate literally moments (e.g. I throw you from less). I assume that "te echo mucho de menos" means I miss you alot, however I haven't been sure how to say I miss you a lot except by saying something like me haces mucha falta (you make me much lack).
     
  3. masha New Member

    Spain, Spanish
    "I miss you a lot" = Te echo mucho de menos
    "I need you so much..." = Me haces mucha falta

    Saluditos ;)
     
  4. supercrom Banned

    Cercado de Lima, Lima, Perú
    Homo peruvianus, practising AE n' learning BE
    Completamente de acuerdo contigo, no podría haber sido de otra manera, a veces no caben muchas dudas en algunas dudas..., je je je, parece redundante.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  5. cristóbal Senior Member

    EEUU
    EEUU/Inglés
    Te extraño mucho, also means "I miss you a lot."
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  6. yoyoyo345 New Member

    SoCal
    USA, English
    I'm confused. I was dating a guy from Venezuela for awhile and one time when I said "Te extraño" to him he corrected me and explained it was better that I say "Me haces falta" because it was the way of saying I miss you to someone you truly care about. I have used it as "I miss you" ever since. Its "I need you"? Because that's a really different thing to say.
     
  7. Life

    Life Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano porteño
    I miss you is Te extraño or Te echo de menos.
     
  8. lforestier

    lforestier Moderator

    San Antonio, TX USA
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English
    The guy from Venezuela is not entirely right. "Me haces falta" means "I need you", while "I miss you" is always "te extraño" or "te echo de menos".
    They more or less convey the same sentiment but don't mean the same.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  9. yoyoyo345 New Member

    SoCal
    USA, English
    Yes, I knew both those phrases. But he insisted "Me haces falta" is another more personal way to say to someone you love that you miss them, and I've asked people in my Spanish class if they've heard the phrase, and they all have also said they learned it as "I miss you." Maybe its coloquial to Venezuela?...and to the additional reply I've received...I don't see how those two phrases are even remotely the same. Because when I saw him again he said to me "Me hiciste falta" which...maybe its just in English...would mean "I needed you" and therefore he no longer needed me? I don't get it.
     
  10. Life

    Life Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano porteño
    For me, Me haces falta is Te necesito (I need you).
    But, as Luis said, they are near.
    If you miss your boyfriend, it's because he's not near. So you may feel that you need him by your side and you say "Me haces falta".
    On the other hand, you can tell him "Me haces falta" or "Te necesito" even if he's near and you don't miss him.
     
  11. lforestier

    lforestier Moderator

    San Antonio, TX USA
    Puerto Rico - Spanish/English
    Me hicistes falta means I felt a need for you but doesn't say whether he needs you now or not. I can see how a need is more personal than simply missing somebody.
    It is common to hear "Me haces falta". Sometimes people use a phrase because it sounds romantic and they learned it that way but they don't consider what they are actually saying. With time the original meaning changes and that's how languages evolve.
    But with this phrase, it still means "I need you (to be with me)" so I would stick to "Te extraño" so that you won't be misunderstood.
     
  12. yoyoyo345 New Member

    SoCal
    USA, English
    Thanks. I was just confused. Its true this guy didn't teach me much useful Spanish vocabulary. Now it seems I am going to have to pass on this information to my fellow misinformed classmates.
     
  13. Life

    Life Senior Member

    Argentina
    Castellano porteño
    And keep visiting the forums. You learn a lot!
     
  14. whattheflock Senior Member

    Inglesito, US of A
    I like the direct translation of "Me haces falta" = "I'm lacking you."
    You gotta admit it's a much tenderloving phrase in Spanish! Although the translation does underline the Spanish deeper meaning in this phrase: it's not only that I need you, but that you would complete me. Jerry McGuire, anyone?
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  15. ChicaEspanola New Member

    USA English
    ¡Hola! Estoy neuvo a este forum (soy canadiense y aprendo español para uno año soledad a los unos libros). ¡Instructor(a) mucho quiero! Este sitio es muy útil. ¿Alguna recomendaciónes para programar de ordenador bueno aprender? Tengo¨Instant Immersion¨y el demonstración gratis de ¨Rosetta Stone¨ (¡es muy caro!). ¿Que es el mejor en las opiniónes de vosotros? ¿Tambien... alguna recomendaciónes para los libros enseñar como libro de texto o un tutor? Muchas gracias (penso mi español es muy mal y limitado, jaja). ¡Hasta lugo!

    Hello! I'm new to this forum (I'm Canadian and have been learning Spanish for one year via some books). I really want an instructor! This site is very useful. Any recommendations for a good computer program to learn? I have "Instant Immersion" and a free demo of "Rosetta Stone" (it's really expensive!). What are your opinions? Also, any recommendations for a book to teach similar to a text book or a tutor? Many thanks :)
     
  16. Snubby

    Snubby Senior Member

    Responding to the immediately preceding post by ChicaEspanola (I forgot to "quote") --

    ¡Hola!
    I've found several of the books and tapes by Juan Kattán-Ibarra to be very user-friendly for studying Spanish on one's own. They're available from Amazon.com:
    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_pg_1/002-6415520-2400840?ie=UTF8&rs=&keywords=kattan-ibarra&rh=i%3Aaps%2Ck%3Akattan-ibarra&page=1
    Also, stick around this forum for a great learning opportunity!
    As far as a personal tutor goes, you'll need to check the available resources where you live in Canada.
    Good luck and happy learning!
     
  17. ChicaEspanola New Member

    USA English
    Thanks Snubby! I actually just moved to Houston, so I think I'll probably have more success finding a tutor here than in Canada. It's so hard with graduate classes to find time (and money) for formal Spanish lessons. Books and technology are so great at this point!
    Thanks again :) Please let me know if you come across anything else that's been very useful.
     
  18. OJITO CONMIGO Junior Member

    Ahora en el mar cantábrico
    España, español
    Hola, chica canadiense: Vente para España y en un mes te ponemos al tanto. Pero de momento te recomendaría un método muy barato (y no te rías) ver cartoons y películas infantiles en español, no veas cómo se aprende. Saludos.:)
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  19. ChicaEspanola New Member

    USA English
    Jajaja. ¡Voy a España en agossto! Pero una semana solamente:( Cartoons y películas infantiles en español... ¡una buena idea! Muchas gracias y saludos a Estados Unidos de América. :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  20. Oyemicanto New Member

    dutch, german, spanish, english, belgian
    Sí aprendes mucho de cartoons y películas, he aprendido mucho de música española/latina también, y hablar mucho con personas de Sudamérica/España. Nunca he visitado una escuela española, he aprendido todos de mi tiempo en Tenerife (he vivido allí).
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  21. specs New Member

    New Zealand
    English
    Hey, I'm just starting to learn Spanish after finding out I have Spanish in me. But I was wondering why Google translate says te echo mucho de menos means "echo you very much". Also, when translated word by word (te, echo, mucho, de, menos) it came up with.. "you, echo, much, of, less". I was wondering if someone could explain how it means I miss you a lot.

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  22. Tacherie

    Tacherie Senior Member

    Spanish - Argentina
    That means: "Don't use the google translator".
    Software usually translates word by word, the better ones phrase by phrase, but a machine cannot grasp the real meaning of idiomatic expressions or special connotations. I suggest you stick to the forum... it's great by the way.

    "Te echo de menos" is idiomatic for "I miss you" in quite a few countries in Latin America (not in Argentina, for example, where we only hear it in imported soup operas). I don't think there's an explanation why.

    Welcome and best regards.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  23. specs New Member

    New Zealand
    English
    Ok. Thats good, I just bought a phrase book. =]

    Sweet. Thanks heaps.
     
    Last edited: Nov 19, 2014
  24. jkgla New Member

    3f62hf
    Aprendo español con 'Destinos'. Esta muy divertido (pero español de Sudamérica, no español castellano).
     

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