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Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PLEASE CONTRIBUTE

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Paulfromitaly, Mar 22, 2013.

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  1. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Abbiamo riordinato e controllato tutti i vostri contributi alla lista di termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in Brirtish English e American English.
    Ora la lista è abbastanza estesa, ma ancora migliorabile, quindi inserite pure un messaggio in questo nuovo thread se:
    - Avete altre voci da suggerire (sempre nel formato: Termine italiano - termine AmE - termine BrE)
    - Le voci in elenco sono a vostro parere errate, incomplete, imprecise (dettagliate i vostri commenti in modo da aiutarci a correggere eventualmente la voce in oggetto)

    Grazie per la collaborazione :)


    We’ve checked and reorganized all of your contributions to the list of British and American English translations from Italian. By now the list is pretty big, but it can still be improved. Feel free to add a new post to this thread if:
    - you have other entries to suggest (keeping to the format Italian term – AmE term – BrE term)
    - you think any of the current entries are incorrect, imprecise or incomplete (couch your comments in a way that will help us correct the entry in question)

    Thanks for giving us a hand with this :)

    Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English <--- CLICK
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  2. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Termine in italiano: portafogli(o)
    Termine in AmE: billfold/wallet
    Termine in BrE: wallet/purse

    Sapevo che "billfold" fosse tipicamente AmE ma non è stato menzionato nella lista. :)
     
  3. rrose17

    rrose17 Senior Member

    Montreal
    Canada, English
    We would need a BE expert here, but I don't think purse is the same as wallet, at least not in modern usage. A purse is what Americans often call a handbag or pocketbook.
     
  4. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    BrE:for storing money, you have two different items. A wallet is where you can put notes in without having to fold them. It also has slots for putting your cards in. A purse is what you put coins into - there are no special compartments for cards or notes, so you have to fold notes up to put them in.

    A bag a woman carries on their shoulder is not called a purse but a bag, or handbag.
     
  5. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Termine in italiano: portamonete
    Termine in AmE: change purse
    Termine in BrE: purse
     
  6. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with cotenna di maiale fritta. The BrE term is shown as pork rinds, but I have never heard this term and have always seen this product sold as pork scratchings.

    An entry containing a typo:

    The entry that starts with patata arrostita con la buccia. The AmE term is shown as backed potato, but this should be baked potato.

    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with silenziatore (di macchina). The BrE term is shown as muffler, but I have never heard this and have only ever seen the device referred to as a silencer.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  7. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Fixed, thanks.
     
  8. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    An entry that is incorrect in my opinion:

    The entry that starts with ragazze scout. The BrE term is shown as girl scout, but in my experience these people are called girl guides (often shortened to just guides).
     
  9. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I thought girl scout was American. We definitely talk about girl guides in BE.;)

    Incorrect entries (in my opinion):
    Camper. This is not a caravan: a caravan is a roulotte, not a camper. In BE I'd say camper, campervan, Dormobile (very old-fashioned!), motorhome....Cotenna di maiale fritta. Soundshift says: "The BrE term is shown as pork rinds, but I have never heard this term and have always seen this product sold as pork scratchings". I agree, but would just like to add that I associate "pork scratchings" with the stuff you buy in a packet in a pub to drink with your beer. Bacon rinds come off fried bacon, however, so I think that's a closer meaning. And "pork crackling" is what comes off your Sunday Roast (or off your "porchetta" in Italy).:)

    New suggestion:

    Termine in italiano: diverso/a/i/e da
    Termine in AmE: different than
    Termine in BrE: different from

    Excuse the "bold", but for some reason I can't remove it!:)
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2013
  10. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Both fixed, thanks
     
  11. longplay Senior Member

    italian
    Italiano:"Gamberetto"-AE: prawn, shrimp; BE: shrimp, prawn. Forse c' è un doppione.
     
  12. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian biling
    Termine in italiano: frizzante
    Termine in AmE: carbonated
    Termine in BrE: fizzy
     
  13. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I confirm "girl scouts" is AE.

    I think "Pork rinds" is also AE.

    In the South we also have "chitlins". I just learned the word "chitterlings" (so I suppose it's BE?), looking up "chitlins";). But I don't like the Italian translation of "trippa di maiale." When I lived in Modena I was introduced to something that looked (and tasted) like "chitlins", but it had a different name (probably in modenese). Does anyone have an alternate term to "trippa di maiale"? (This term brings to mind "trippa in umido", that has nothing to do with "chitlins" - although I suppose both are derived from the intestines - and not the "cotenna").

    Here's something new (inspired by a recent thread):
    Termine in italiano: divertirsi un sacco
    Termine in AmE: have a great time, have a wonderful time
    Termine in BrE: have a brilliant time

    BE speakers often use "brilliant" where AE speakers might say "great, wonderful" ("Brilliant" in AE means "highly intelligent, extremely clever" - example: "brilliant deduction", "Sherlocks Holmes was brilliant").

    Termine in italiano: fantastico
    Termine in AmE: great, wonderful, fantastic
    Termine in BrE: brilliant, fantastic

    Termine in italiano: geniale
    Termine in AmE: brilliant
    Termine in BrE: clever?
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  14. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Italiano: gamberetto
    BE: shrimp

    Italiano: gambero
    BE: prawn


    I don't know if they're the same thing in AE, so I hope the Americans will chip in here, but to me there's a difference between a shrimp and a prawn.:)

    Curio, regards trippa di maiale, that to me is pork tripe, which I believe is the same in both AE and BE so I won't add it here and I confirm tripe is part of an animal's stomach, not its intestines. ;)

    And regards chitterlings, I confirm it's BE:

    Italiano: intestini di maiale
    AE: chitlins
    BE: chitterlings
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2013
  15. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    We know this is a tricky one as there doesn't seem to be general consensus about it

    [h=3]Gamberi - gamberetti - scampi - gamberoni[/h]
     
  16. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
     
  17. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Ciccioli doesn't correspond to chitterlings in BE, so we've got another difference here! Ciccioli (see here) are what we call pork scratchings (see here). These are chitterlings (intestini di maiale).;)
     
  18. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Is this accurate?
     
  19. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    In BE we do talk about Preschool Education, which takes the form of a nursery school or playgroup in the UK: offhand I don't remember any of my friends or relatives in the UK saying their kids went to preschool, however (my little horror went to an asilo, of course!:D). I'd say preschool was AE, but let's see what they say on the other side of the pond.:)

    As regards kindergarten, I've just had a look at what Wiki has to say (here), I quote:

    In the United States and anglophone Canada, as well as in parts of Australia, such as New South Wales, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory, kindergarten is the word often restricted in use to describe the first year of education in a primary or elementary school

    Now, I know that's correct as regards Australia, because I went to kindergarten, there, but I don't know about the States or Canada.;)

    PS. I've just noticed that the link also confirms what I said about nursery school and playgroup above.:)
     
  20. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    I think we've had several threads on this and we seem to go around and around (same as the discussion of laurea!) - anyway, the definition given in post #19 for kindergarten also applies here in the States
    kindergarten is the word often restricted in use to describe the first year of education in a primary or elementary school :tick:
    In most places, children have to be 5 to enter kindergarten (or have their fifth birthday by a certain date in the fall.)
    Pre-school usually includes one or two years before kindergarten, meaning three- and four-year-olds.
    The "classes" for the babies (from whatever starting age they accept up to three years) are referred to as "nursery school" or "day care."
    The complication may come because many private centers include classes for all these levels, so you may have a Kindergartener attending classes at a "Preschool." Public schools (at least in New Jersey) also offer preschool classes, which may or may not be in a separate building from the other grades. In the district where I worked there were two large preschools, enrolling about 1200 children in total (ages 3 and 4).
     
  21. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    According to the Cambridge dictionary and the Longman dictionary:
    They seem to suggest that kindergarten is synonymous with nursery school in BrE and preschool is the AmE version of nursery school/kindergarten.
    I understand that it's not so easy but we need to be concise :)

    What about this?

     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2013
  22. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Yes, for the sake of a concise dictionary definition, AmE "preschool" includes "kindergarten," but in most cases, the distinction is maintained and the terms "preschool" usually means 3- and 4-year-olds.
     
  23. MR1492

    MR1492 Senior Member

    Bowie, MD
    English -USA
    Termine in italiano: assegno
    Termine in AmE: check
    Termine in BrE: cheque
     
  24. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    Let me add:
    Italian: alcol denaturato
    AE: rubbing alcohol (also, denatured alcohol)
    BE: surgical spirit

    Ethyl or isopropyl alcohol mixture used in medicine and sanitation as a disinfectant.
    We have the following translation here:"
    Ethyl alcohol is the principal ingredient in rubbing alcohol.
    L'alcol etilico è il componente principale di molti disinfettanti.

    http://www.wordreference.com/enit/alcohol
     
  25. Connie Eyeland

    Connie Eyeland Senior Member

    Brescia (Italia)
    Italiano
    Ciao, Paul.

    In Italia abbiamo l'"asilo nido" (alias "nido d'infanzia") che è la struttura per bambini dai 3 mesi ai 3 anni
    e la "scuola dell'infanzia" (comunemente detta "scuola materna", popolarmente anche "asilo"), che è la struttura educativa per bambini dai 3 ai 6 anni.

    Il termine "asilo" a mio avviso può creare equivoci su quale delle due strutture si intenda.
    Per stare sul termine più usato e inequivocabile, io nella definizione metterei piuttosto "scuola materna".

    Aggiungo che mi risulta che in AE un sinonimo di preschool sia pre-kindergarten (spesso abbreviato in pre-K o PK), in quanto il kindergarten, come hanno detto sia London che Joan (=> ciao ad entrambe:)), è solo per bambini di almeno 5 anni (corrispondente al nostro ultimo anno di materna, praticamente, in cui si fanno già attività didattiche di preparazione alle elementari).

    Riallacciandomi ai post di Joan, pur capendo la necessità di essere concisi, mi pare che sarebbe impreciso inserire solo uno o solo l'altro termine come corrispondente del vocabolo italiano; non si potrebbero inserire entrambi specificando l'età degli utenti? Intendo, ad esempio:
    AmE = preschool, pre-kindergarten (for kids aged 3 and 4)
    .........kindergarten (for kids aged 5)
     
  26. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Temo ti sia sfuggito un aspetto non secondario quando si stila un ELENCO di termini stile thesaurus e non si vuole riscrivere un dizionario :)

     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  27. King Crimson

    King Crimson Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    Italiano
    E ora andiamo un po' in cucina...

    Termine in italiano: credenza con alzata (*)
    Termine in AmE: China hutch
    Termine in BrE: Welsh dresser

    (*) ho visto che l'altro elenco contiene già le traduzioni di questo termine, ma secondo me si riferiscono alla credenza senza alzata

    Termine in italiano: portapane
    Termine in AmE: bread box
    Termine in BrE: bread bin

    Termine in italiano: cavo elettrico (elettrodomestico)
    Termine in AmE: flex
    Termine in BrE: electric cord

    Termine in italiano: frullatore
    Termine in AmE: blender
    Termine in BrE: liquidizer / blender

    Termine in italiano: tovagliolo
    Termine in AmE: napkin
    Termine in BrE: napkin / serviette

    Termine in italiano: lavare i piatti
    Termine in AmE: do the dishes
    Termine in BrE: wash up

    Termine in italiano: fagiolone, fagiolo americano, fagiolo di Spagna
    Termine in AmE: runner bean
    Termine in BrE: string bean
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  28. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Termine in italiano: tovagliolo
    Termine in AmE: napkin
    Termine in BrE: napkin / serviette

    Serviette è un tovagliolo di carta, napkin è quello di stoffa.

    Termine in italiano: fagiolone, fagiolo americano, fagiolo di Spagna
    Termine in AmE: runner bean ..non credo, penso si dica butter bean anche in AE....*
    Termine in BrE: butter bean

    Termine in italiano: fagiolino/cornetto
    Termine in AmE: string bean
    Termine in BrE: runner/string bean
     
  29. King Crimson

    King Crimson Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    Italiano
    Ciao LC, però secondo Wiki sembra che serviette sia quello di carta solo in certi posti...

    EDIT: ho notato che l'articolo di Wiki, su questo aspetto, fa riferimento a una discussione del forum inglese-spagnolo di WR! E' veramente bizzarro, noi citiamo Wiki, che a sua volta cita WR, il tutto mi sembra paurosamente autoreferenziale...:p
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  30. Connie Eyeland

    Connie Eyeland Senior Member

    Brescia (Italia)
    Italiano
    @Paul:
    Ho visto che sull'elenco in alcuni casi ci sono delle note, quindi mi pareva possibile aggiungerle anche in questo caso (ovviamente da voi abbreviate il più possibile). Se non si può fare, niente.
    Principalmente comunque avevo scritto per segnalare la voce italiana "scuola materna" anziché "asilo".
     
  31. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Quella si può aggiungere senza problemi
     
  32. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    Termine in italiano: detersivo liquido per piatti
    Termine in AmE: dish soap, dish liquid (unsure)
    Termine in BrE: washing-up liquid
     
  33. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Termine in AmE: dish-washing liquid?
     
  34. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I'm not familiar with the term "butter beans," but in AE we call them "lima beans." :)
    Here's a link about them (connecting them to "butter beans", and with a picture):
    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-lima-beans.htm
     
  35. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    In addition to "wash up" (and "do the washing-up") BrE also uses "do the dishes" in the sense of "lavare i piatti".
     
  36. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    AE: dish detergent
     
  37. King Crimson

    King Crimson Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    Italiano
    Yes, Wiki too confirms that (scientific name: Phaseolus lunatus), whereas runner bean seems to be a different legume (Phaseolus coccineus) but note also that (surprise, surprise)... Runner beans have also been called "Oregon Lima Bean" (and now I got completely lost).
     
  38. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Ok curio, so::)

    Termine in italiano: fagiolone, fagiolo americano, fagiolo di Spagna
    Termine in AmE: Lima bean
    Termine in BrE: butter bean
     
  39. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    To me, a serviette is something made of cloth whereas a napkin can be a piece of kitchen roll - seems to be the complete opposite of LC's interpretation :(
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  40. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I often hear the term "paper napkins". When "napkins" is not preceded by "paper", I think of something made of fabric. When I hear the word "serviette", I think "paper", and the fact that I don't hear the combination "paper serviette" suggests to me that serviettes tend in fact to be made of paper. Who is Jo?
     
  41. AshleySarah

    AshleySarah Senior Member

    Australia
    English - N.Ireland
    Napery is household linen, tablecloths and napkins. So in my opinion, napkins are the ones made of cloth, while serviettes are the ones made of paper.
     
  42. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    How about we just put napkin and serviettes as synonyms? I've looked in the OED, WR and Wikipedia, and there appears to be no clear-cut difference between them.
     
  43. King Crimson

    King Crimson Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    Italiano
    For the purposes of this thread can we at least agree on "serviette" not being used in AE (regardless it's made of cloth or paper)? AE foreros are eagerly awaited...:)
     
  44. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    can we at least agree on "serviette" not being used in AE :tick: - Confirmed!
     
  45. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Me!:) I agree with you, by the way. A napkin to me is made of cloth unless you specify paper napkin.

    Interesting that in Ireland it's the other way round!;)

    @ the other Jo:D. Yes, at least we now know you lot don't say serviette!.:)
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013
  46. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    :tick:
     
  47. ☺

    Senior Member

    IL BEL PAESE
    italiano
    Termine in italiano: Bancomat
    Termine in AmE: ATM (Automated Teller Machine)
    Termine in BrE: Cash Machine / Cashpoint / Cashline / Hole in the wall
     
  48. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    Also "cash machine" sometimes in AE.
     
  49. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    We say ATM too, but I have never heard "cashline" before. Has anyone else BE?
     
  50. ☺

    Senior Member

    IL BEL PAESE
    italiano
    Ho preso il tutto da qui


    Termine in italiano: Slot machine
    Termine in AmE: Slot machine
    Termine in BrE: Fruit machine

    Fonte: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slot_machine
     
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