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Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PLEASE CONTRIBUTE!

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Paulfromitaly, Apr 26, 2013.

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  1. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    I think I've also heard "pluck" in the UK
     
  2. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Pluck is synonymous with courage, fortitude in AE, too. Bottle, however, would never be used with a similar meaning. ;)
     
  3. AshleySarah

    AshleySarah Senior Member

    Australia
    English - N.Ireland
    I'm not familiar with "bottle" in BE with the meaning of courage/pluck, but I am familiar with "guts" and "gumption" with those meanings.
     
  4. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    Guts is another synonym for bottle, but I'm not sure if that's BE only or used in both. I don't see why pluck couldn't be used, it would be fine in BE (although it's a bit old-fashioned to my ears).
     
  5. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    I'm sure our BE contingent will soon weigh in with their opinions.

    Guts
    and gumption are widely used in AE, too, so they don't qualify for this thread. ;)

    And, Tegs, I think pluck is a bit dated in AE, too....
     
  6. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Yeah, "He's got a lot of bottle" is BE slang, and "bottle" does indeed mean "courage" here.
     
  7. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Ciao Paul :)
    This AE speaker isn't familiar with "jibe with" (unless it's some sort of modern slang I don't know about). So I have no idea what you might mean (in Italian) by "concordare con" if not simply "to agree with".

    Termine in italiano: moto, motocicletta
    Termine in AmE: motorcycle
    Termine in BrE: motorbike

    Termine in italiano: motorino
    Termine in AmE: motorbike
    Termine in BrE: ?

    I only supply the above, because in AE we distinguish between motorcycles and motorbikes, although motorcyclists often refer to themseles as "bikers" (tho' I'm not certain whether it's more BE and/or Canadian than U.S. English).
     
  8. AshleySarah

    AshleySarah Senior Member

    Australia
    English - N.Ireland
    Termine in italiano: motorino
    Termine in AmE: motorbike
    Termine in BrE: scooter/motor scooter
     
  9. L'Enrico Senior Member

    Italiano
    Termine in italiano: cassettone (also canterale)
    Termine in AmE: dresser
    Termine in BrE: chest of drawers

    E.
     
  10. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
    Mornin' Curio :)
    Mmmh. To jibe with (often misspelled as jive) is actually a 200-year-old americanism. "His account didn't jibe with the evidence."
    The two terms are often used indifferently by [us] bikers. To avoid confusion, I would translate motorino with (motor) scooter or even moped.

    The US DOT defines a motorcycle as: A two- or three-wheeled motor vehicle designed to transport one or two people, including motor scooters, minibikes, and mopeds. So it's a generic term pretty much equivalent to the Italian motociclo.
    (You further define your choice of wheels by using such words as: custom, bagger, dresser, crotch-rocket, sports [bike], dual-sport, off-road, tourer, sports-tourer, V-Twin, etc.) Let's see if any US riders wish to chime in. ;)
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
  11. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    I grew up in the US hearing both chest of drawers and dresser as synonyms for the exactly same thing.
    Unless dresser is unknown in BE I see no distinction here.
     
  12. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    BE has both 'dresser' and 'chest of drawers', but in BE they are not synonyms.
     
  13. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Would you please elaborate?
    We already have these entries, are they accurate?

    Termine in italiano: cassettone (see photo)
    Termine in AmE: dresser / bureau
    Termine in BrE: chest of drawers

    Termine in italiano: credenza (see photo)
    Termine in AmE: buffet
    Termine in BrE: sideboard / dresser
     
  14. AshleySarah

    AshleySarah Senior Member

    Australia
    English - N.Ireland
    Paul, I agree with your BE entries on cassettone and credenza. There's another piece of bedroom furniture which, in BE, is called a "dressing table". This is more or less a chest of drawers with a mirror attached. I think it's called a "toeletta" in Italian (???) but I've no idea what it is in AE.
     
  15. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Yes, we call that toeletta :)

    Termine in italiano: toeletta (see photo)
    Termine in AmE: ??
    Termine in BrE: dressing table
     
  16. Teerex51

    Teerex51 Senior Member

    Milan, Italy
    Italian
     
  17. AshleySarah

    AshleySarah Senior Member

    Australia
    English - N.Ireland
  18. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    I would call that a vanity table. It is found in a bedroom, not a bathroom.

    I would call the various items shown in the Google page (BE "vanity units") bathroom sink units.
     
  19. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Right, so we can also add this

    Termine in italiano: mobiletto con lavandino (see photo)
    Termine in AmE: bathroom sink unit
    Termine in BrE: vanity unit
     
  20. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    I'd call all of those "bathroom sink units" too. Never heard of "vanity units" before.

    PS. I think dressing table and vanity (table) are synonyms in BE. Vanity table might've started off AE but it isn't so clear cut now. Don't think it's worth including :)

    They are accurate except for "sideboard". A sideboard is not a synonym for a dresser.

    This sort of thing is a sideboard:
    http://mto.lauraashley.com/furniture/cabinet/3561610/confirmation/dorset-sideboard?tmcampid=110&tmad=c&tmplaceref=14779&source={ifpe:1}{ifpla:2}&gclid=CKyh_8f56rYCFYXMtAodU28A9g
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2013
  21. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    I would also have said bathroom sink unit for a mobiletto con lavandino, but I checked it out on Google and apparently we do talk about vanity units in BE. A new one on me, I have to admit.:)
     
  22. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian biling
    Fascinating. To me it's only ever a hand basin in the bathroom and a sink in the kitchen. :)
     
  23. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Termine in italiano: addetto alle vendite
    Termine in AmE: sales associate
    Termine in BrE: sales assistant / sales executive
     
  24. italtrav

    italtrav Senior Member

    Brooklyn
    English
    <<Termine in italiano: fegato (fig. per "coraggio")
    Termine in AmE:
    moxie
    Termine in BrE:
    bottle>>

    Moxie was originally the trade name of a soft drink once sold as a tonic that, to paraphrase Garrison Keillor, gave shy folks the get-up-and-go to get up and do what's got to be done. It is still produced today in small quantities, but I don't think that the term today is anymore widespread than the soda, and I don't believe it can be used today except as self-consciously old-fashioned speech. However, I don't have a contemporary idiomatic alternative.
     
  25. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    A Sales Executive is a "Dirigente", not a Sales Assistant.;)
     
  26. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Also, "sales assistant" can be used in AE, too - as well as "sales clerk" (I don't think I've ever used "sales associate").
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2013
  27. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    I recently heard it on an American TV show (a woman was asked about her job and she said she was a "sales associate"), that's why I've mentioned it :)
     
  28. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Hi curiosone and Paul - yes "sales associate" is quite popular here for the lowly "sales clerk." I guess it's in the same tradition as "sanitation engineer" for "garbageman."
     
  29. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I guess it's like referring to a "secretary" as an "executive assistant." ;)
     
  30. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    The modern US term for secretary is admin(istrative) assistant; for executive secretary--executive assistant.
     
  31. ginestre Senior Member

    I agree that the photo could be a sideboard, but only if it's in a dining-room: a sideboard must contain plates, dishes and other crockery as wella s cutlery, napkins etc. Sideboards are where you keep the stuff you use to set the table. In one of the photos it seems to be in a bedroom, where it would need another name. But quite what that other name would be is unclear to me.
     
  32. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    So maybe we could add:

    Termine in italiano: segretario esecutivoAssistente/Segretaria di Direzione
    Termine in AmE:
    executive secretary/assistant
    Termine in BrE:
    PA/Personal assistant
    ?
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2013
  33. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    For sure.:) They are two different things.;)

    A cassettone/comò is a chest of drawers, a (Welsh, kitchen) dresser is a credenza.;) Here's a photo of a kitchen dresser.:)

    No, that in Italian is an "Assistente/Segretaria di Direzione".;)
     
  34. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    That photo shows what in AE we would call a sideboard--yes, in a dining room or possibly a kitchen. AE chest of drawers/dresser (synonyms) would only be found in a bedroom.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2013
  35. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    That's another difference, then.;) A sideboard in BE is this sort of thing, which we normally keep in the dining room (or dining area, if you've got one of those big combined kitchen/diner things) . Oddly enough, that is also a credenza in Italian: they don't distinguish between a dresser and a sideboard as we do in BE.:)

    A chest of drawers would normally be found in a bedroom.:)

    OT. I have a antique one in one of my bathrooms but that's because a) it looks good in there and b) I like having somewhere to keep all the towels as well as a surface to stand things on: this one has beautiful deep drawers and a marble top!:)
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2013
  36. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Would you also call it buffet? Or is a buffet different from a sideboard?
     
  37. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Yes, I could call it a buffet as well--perhaps even moreso than a sideboard--don't ask me why!

    Google image shows the same photos for both terms --sideboard furniture & buffet furniture --when I search on them. (You need to add "furniture" or you just get pictures of food on a table :D.)
     
  38. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I've always called a sideboard (of the kind shown by Tegs) a sideboard (not a buffet). For me a buffet (or buffet table) is this: http://weddingbuffet.net/wp-content...-ideas-How-to-set-up-wedding-buffet-table.jpg

    And I might add that I grew up calling a "cassettone" any of these: chest of drawers, bureau, dresser (not to be confused with a "dressing table" (which my mum had - I might add that nowadays they are rarely seen).
     
  39. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    This must be another US/UK difference then as I believe a bureau is not a chest of drawers in BrE but rather a writing desk.
     
  40. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Yes, you're quite right. A bureau is a (rather old-fashioned) desk (scrittoio) in BE, not a chest of drawers.;)
     
  41. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Right, so how would AmE speakers call a writing desk? :)
     
  42. JasonNPato Senior Member

    GA USA
    USA-English
    I wouldn't know what a buffet is, in AmE. More commonly, I think what you have in the picture would be called a china cabinet. However, china cabinets generally have a larger glass display. Nonetheless, if pressed to come up with a name for what you have in the picture, I'd still say "china cabinet"

    We'd just call it a desk. It would be understood that it is for writing.

    Perhaps a contemporary alternative would be "grit" or "spunk." I agree though - moxie is decidedly old-fashioned and would only be used if you are actively trying to sound old-fashioned.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2013
  43. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Is it the same thing as a china hutch?
     
  44. JasonNPato Senior Member

    GA USA
    USA-English
    Yes, though hutch is very infrequently used. In AmE, most pieces of furniture with a small door are and shelves used for storage are called "cabinets." In the bathroom, we have a medicine cabinet or bathroom cabinet. In the kitchen, we have "kitchen cabinets" (though this one may also be called a cupboard), and, the furniture in which we keep and display china is called a china cabinet.

    We really like the word "cabinet." :)
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2013
  45. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    We also have "china cabinets". There are not Welsh dressers though.

    We also call desks "desks", not "writing desks".

    I'm not sure if maybe the whole Welsh dresser issue is too obscure for our word list. The most I have ever talked about Welsh dressers is on this forum :D
     
  46. batterpudding New Member

    English - Australia
    Termine in italiano: motorino
    Termine in AmE: motorbike
    Termine in BrE: moped

    Just an additional translation, (motor) scooter as Ashley suggests is also fine :)
     
  47. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    To me cabinet suggests something that is built in or attached to the wall--not a piece of furniture. (But perhaps the AE difference between us is regional, if you are speaking from a Southerner's perspective vs. my northern/midwestern background).
     
  48. JasonNPato Senior Member

    GA USA
    USA-English
    What would you call a non-attached cabinet, then? I agree that cabinet usually suggests something built-in or attached, but I think if I saw a cabinet-like object, that is, anything that has a small door with at least one shelf for storage, I'd still call it a cabinet. For example, I'm looking at my desk right now, and, instead of having a drawer, it has a cabinet, and, really, there is no other word I could imagine using except cabinet.

    Funnily enough, I actually was raised in Southern US, so I am interested to see if there really is a regional difference.
     
  49. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    My antique bedside table corresponds to your definition of "cabinet," but I'd never call it a "bed-side cabinet." And I might also call a "china cabinet" a "china closet" (if it's built-in, instead of attached or standing). And while I may have a "kitchen cabinet" or "kitchen cupboard," if it's built-in (like a closet) I'd probably call it a pantry (in Italian: "dispensa").
     
  50. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
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