Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English - PLEASE CONTRIBUTE!

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Paulfromitaly, Aug 12, 2013.

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  1. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Please have a look at the database, some of your suggestions are already there :)

    Termini che hanno una traduzione diversa in American English e in British English

     
  2. WordsWordWords Senior Member

    Piemonte, Italy
    Am English
    Thanks Paul, I wasn't aware of this link and thought that such a database was what was being concocted from the posts in this thread. Excuse my ignorance, but how does one get there from the WR homepage? (I may have missed something along the way...)

    Great compilation :)
     
  3. verseau213 Senior Member

    English - American
    I'm probably chiming in late, but wanted to share because I've never heard anyone in my life call what is seen in the picture for "credenza" a buffet in the US. I've always called/heard it called a hutch, and when Googled it matches the pictures.
     
  4. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I tend to agree with you (about "buffet"), but I've always heard it called a "sideboard" or a "buffet table" (not just "buffet" which for me means there's food). Hutch sounds archaic to me.
     
  5. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    And I grew up thinking a dresser was this! It seems you have to specify "Welsh".
     
  6. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Un saluto a tutti. :) La mia vuole essere più una domanda che un'affermazione. Sbaglio o esiste questa differenza tra BE e AE?
    E se sì, è riferta solo al calcio o anche ad altri sport?

    Termine in italiano: Allenatore
    Termine in AmE: Coach
    Termine in BrE: Manager

    Grazie a chiunque vorrà intervenire. :)
     
  7. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Ciao Matrap, mentre aspettiamo le risposte dei madrelingua (che interessano anche a me), ho controllato nei vari learner's dictionaries, sia britannici (Oxford, Cambridge, Longman ecc) sia nel Webster's Learner's Dictionary, americano, che in genere sono molto precisi nell'indicare se un vocabolo è BrE o AmE. Nessuno di essi assegna un'etichetta a coach e manager in questo senso. Ad esempio l'OALD li dà come perfetti sinonimi (entrambi non limitati al calcio) e riporta due esempi quasi identici: coach manager
    Solo il Cambridge fa una distinzione per manager con quello "and sometimes": the person whose job is to organize and sometimes train a sports team".
    Inoltre l'uso di "coach" in questo senso (prima in ambito accademico, poi sportivo), secondo l'Online Etymology Dictionary, è di origine britannica: " Meaning "instructor/trainer" is c.1830 Oxford University slang for a tutor who "carries" a student through an exam; athletic sense is 1861." (link)
     
  8. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Ciao giovannino, grazie del tuo intervento. Hai fatto una ricerca con i fiocchi. :) A questo punto sono curioso anche io di conoscere il parere dei madrelingua per capire se l'uso moderno ha portato ad una differenziazione tral le due sponde dell'oceano o meno.
     
  9. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I'm not a sports buff, but (speaking only for AE) I've always understood "coach" and "manager" to be different jobs. "Coach" means "allenatore" - both in sports (e.g.: basketball coach, football coach, etc - generally for team sports), and also in the sense of tutor (exam preparation comes to mind) - any situation where someone is encouraged and guided by another to improve skills ("language coach" also comes to mind).

    As far as I know, a team manager is not the same thing as a team coach. The manager books games with other teams, and does an organizational job (not a coaching job).
     
  10. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Ciao curiosone, grazie del tuo intervento. Sei il primo madrelingua che risponde. :) Quello che hai segnalato tu è la differenza che (credo) sappiamo un po' tutti, ma ti posso aasicurare che, seguendo le partite di calcio del campionato inglese, gli allenatori sono chiamati "manager" (famosissimo è l'ex allenatore del Manchester United Sir Alex Ferguson che si è ritirato da poco). Forse questo appellativo deriva dal fatto che in GB gli allenatori hanno un ruolo più ampio e si occupano anche di questioni societarie andandosi parzialmente a sovrapporre anche a ruoli che in Italia vengono ricoperti dai direttori sportivi ad esempio). Qualche amico British nei paraggi? :)
     
  11. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Yes, and I agree with Curiosone.>:

    A manager can be a coach and vice versa, but they are actually two different things.:)
     
  12. Matrap

    Matrap Est Mod In Rebus

    Abruzzo, Italy
    Italiano
    Benissimo, allora non so cos'altro dire, se non chiedere ai mod di cancellare tutti i post dal 132 in poi visto che ho proposto una castroneria. :)

    P.s. Bentornata dalle vacanze, london. :D
     
  13. ☺

    Senior Member

    IL BEL PAESE
    italiano
    Prendeteli con le pinze:


    Termine in italiano: Grondaia
    Termine in AmE: Downspout
    Termine in BrE: Drainpipe


    Termine in italiano: Spiffero
    Termine in AmE: Draft
    Termine in BrE: Draught


    Termine in italiano: Assegno
    Termine in AmE: Check
    Termine in BrE: Cheque


    Termine in italiano: Passepartout
    Termine in AmE: Mat board / Matte board
    Termine in BrE: Mount board


    Termine in italiano: Bara
    Termine in AmE: Coffin
    Termine in BrE: Casket


    Termine in italiano: Carillon
    Termine in AmE: Music box
    Termine in BrE: Musical box


    Termine in italiano: Casella
    Termine in AmE: Check box
    Termine in BrE: Tick box


    Termine in italiano: Banco dei testimoni
    Termine in AmE: Witness box
    Termine in BrE: Witness stand


    Termine in italiano: Macinare
    Termine in AmE: To grind
    Termine in BrE: To mince

    Termine in italiano: Scontrino (fiscale)
    Termine in AmE: Check / Sales check
    Termine in BrE: Ticket


    Termine in italiano: Casa delle bambole
    Termine in AmE: Dollhouse
    Termine in BrE: Doll's house


    Termine in italiano: Riformatorio
    Termine in AmE: Reformatory
    Termine in BrE: Community home

    Termine in italiano: Pacco
    Termine in AmE: Basket / Package / Wedding tackle
    Termine in BrE: Lunchbox / Privates


    Termine in italiano: Finocchio / Frocio
    Termine in AmE: Faggot / Fag
    Termine in BrE: Queer / Poof

    Termine in italiano: Ciao / Pronto!
    Termine in AmE: Hello
    Termine in BrE: Hallo / Hello / Hullo
     
  14. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Penso che sia vero il contrario: casket (NAmE), coffin (esp. BrE)
     
  15. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Hi giovannino - that one caught my eye, too, but the fact is that we use both words (coffin, casket) but my personal feeling is that they have different overtones. Other AE speakers may disagree, but "coffin" has a rather cold, clinical, technical feel. Something you might read in a newspaper report. In an actual funeral setting, with family and friends, we would probably refer to the "casket" - it just sounds more proper to me.
     
  16. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    I do not agree with "witness box" as AE - we say "witness stand" also.

    Termine in italiano: Banco dei testimoni

    Termine in AmE: Witness box
    Termine in BrE: Witness stand
     
  17. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Coffin and casket are synonyms in AE. To me the latter term sounds a bit more modern. No other difference.
     
  18. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
     
  19. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Well, the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary's entry for casket wasn't far off the mark, after all. Maybe it was slightly imprecise in stating that coffin is "especially BrE" (since coffin is also used in AmE -- but the OALD does say especially) but I guess everybody agrees that casket sounds distinctly AmE to British ears.
    A previous discuusion at EO: casket/coffin
     
  20. giovannino

    giovannino Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
    Tegs, it might be because it has become dated but I can assure you it was widely used when I lived in the UK in the 1980s. It's in the Collins Dictionary: link
     
  21. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    Ah, it did indeed exist according to Collins :) But yea, I'd say it's dated by now.
     
  22. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    In AE 'grind' and 'mince' have distinct meanings. I agree with 'grind" as a translation for 'macinare,' but we use 'mince' in the sense of 'finely chopping' (herbs, onion, etc).

    I'd also say "receipt" to translate "scontrino." "Check" sounds to me like what AE speakers ask for, when they want "il conto" (at a restaurant), which I believe is "bill" in BE.

    Maybe I need to understand what you mean by "pacco" in Italian. For me it's simply a "package." I don't know where you get "basket" (picnic basket??) as a translation of "pacco," and I never heard of "wedding tackle" (it just sounds to me like the groom's anxious to get the bride in bed :D ) - so if Tegs recognizes it, it must be BE. In AE all I can think of (for 'tackle') is fishing tackle/equipment - which I also wouldn't call "pacco" in Italian. 'Lunchbox' in AE is how children take their lunches to school.
    And finally, "privates" has a totally different meaning (than 'pacco'), at least in AE, and especially in the plural... ;)

    Termine in italiano: conto (al ristorante)
    Termine in AmE: check
    Termine in BrE: bill
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  23. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    Tackle, wedding tackle, package and privates all refer to a man's equipment in BE. I presumed pacco was slang for the same thing in Italian.

    Grind and mince seem to be used exactly the same in AE as they are in BE.
     
  24. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Ah, I missed that meaning--(wedding) tackle left me mystified.

    AE for that could be package, basket, or (my favorite) junk. (Male "package" only). The unisex term would be crotch.

    I don't think so. You say minced beef; we say ground beef.

    In AE, mince is used in a culinary context only to describe chopping onions or other foods finely. The one exception is mincemeat pie, which of course doesn't really contain meat anymore...
     
  25. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    I don't think wedding tackle is all that common in BE, package is probably the most common of those. Junk is very American :D

    Yup, we say minced beef. We "finely chop" onions rather than mincing them I suppose. But we grind salt, pepper and teeth. It depends on the context. I think it's too vague to say that ground is AE and mince is BE. Both are used in both types of English, just in slightly different contexts.
     
  26. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    I see a problem looming here, in the sense that terms which are considered dated shouldn't necessarily be excluded from this glossary. After all, no matter what spoken BE has become, there is still a great deal of excellent literature around from the days before U.S. sit-coms invaded British TV. :D

    I say coffin, musical box, witness box, minced beef, ground pepper, chopped onions...........
     
  27. I was curious about this CPA, so I take profit of this thread. I see that you refer to minced beef, so I assume that mincemeat can be a mix of beef, pork... and who knows what:). But I see the term mincemeat​ widely and generally used, also when it comes to plain beef... Is this true?
     
  28. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    Ti dirò, per me "mincemeat" è quell'impasto di frutta secca che va nelle mince pies natalizie. ;)
     
  29. :confused:Anche se non volevi confondermi le idee ci sei riuscito, CPA:confused:...:)

    Adesso non so più se mincemeat è una trasposizione del termine in "World English" per indicare impropriamente il macinato di carne o se il mincemeat a cui ti riferisci si chiama così perché assomiglia a... minced meat:confused:.

    EDIT: Or, more probably, I sometimes hear mincemeat, some other time minced meat and I am obviously incapable of distinguish one from the other...:)

    Thank you anyway, mincemeat as a mixture of dried fruits is something I've just learned ten minutes ago!
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
  30. WordsWordWords Senior Member

    Piemonte, Italy
    Am English
    :thumbsup:

    I completely agree with this, Joan!

    @ chipul -- You've made the right distinction: "minced meat" is BrE for what we call "ground meat/beef" in AmE. But mincemeat is a dessert and many recipes still include the use beef suet. If you're interested, this is pretty thorough:
    http://recipewise.co.uk/mince-pies-mincemeat-recipes
    ;)
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
  31. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    I'll take your word for it, Wildan - but then I wasn't familiar with the Italian term "pacco" used in this sense, either.:rolleyes: I evidently had a very gentle upbringing, but I'm not familiar with any of these terms in AE, except for crotch, but then when used in reference to "the crotch of one's pants" ("la sella dei pantaloni" in Italian?) - not one's private parts. The only term I'm familiar with (referring to genitals) is "privates."
     
  32. Mary49

    Mary49 Senior Member

    Padova
    Italian
    Si definisce "cavallo dei pantaloni". Ciao curio:)
     
  33. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Yes, crotch is also a legitimate term in tailoring, but context will easily tell you which "crotch" is being referred to :D .

    Privates or private parts are very old-fashioned, almost prudish-sounding, terms. Something my grandmother might have said...
     
  34. Thank you Words, this is extremely instructive (and incredibly appetising too:)). I can see that mincemeat has kept his original name while stepping forward to healthier eating habits (if sweets can be assumed as part of these...). I am not the one buying groceries in England, so I have a lot to learn...:).
     
  35. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Thanks, Mary :) "Cavallo" was on the tip of my tongue, but wouldn't come off. :p (at least I had the right animal in mind... :D)

    Then maybe I'm a bit old-fashioned, and/or prudish. But where I grew up, it isn't considered polite to refer to one's genitals at all, unless you're speaking to a doctor (or a very intimate friend). Which is why I wasn't familiar with the term "pacco"/"package" (in this sense, and without any context at all) in the first place. As far as I'm concerned, any reference is (at best) vulgar.
     
  36. A proposito di... privates, scusate se ripesco un termine che c'è nel glossario:
    Termine italiano: soldato semplice
    Termine AmE: GI / grunt
    Termine BrE: private soldier

    Ma private non è comunemente utilizzato anche negli USA per un soldato semplice, almeno quanto viene anteposto al cognome? Oppure solo quando viene anteposto al cognome? Come in Save Private Ryan​, per intenderci...
     
  37. joanvillafane Senior Member

    U.S., New Jersey
    U.S. English
    Hi chip - these terms are not interchangeable - GI/grunt/private
    GI is very dated - I don't think it's used much today except to refer to U.S. soldiers of an earlier era
    grunt - military slang, probably not used by anyone except US Army or Marines - rather demeaning tone to refer to new recruits
    Private - is a military rank, so it's used with the last name, Private Ryan, etc. I don't think it would be used as a synonym for "soldier."
     
  38. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    Yes, "private" is the correct name (in AE) for a "soldato semplice." "Grunt" is slang, GI is an abbreviation of "government issue" (referring to the clothes and equipment soldiers are given), and can also refer to a soldier (without specifying rank).

    Oops! Sorry Joanvillafane! We evidently cross-posted. I agree about "grunt". Is GI dated? It was very common when I was growing up, because we had the GI Joe toy. Regarding military rank, I'd say "He's a private in the Army" or simply "He's a private" (in a context where it's evident we're talking about military rank). It isn't used only as a title.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
  39. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    Credo che "private" sia il grado formale mentre "GI" e "grunt" siano qualifiche gergali. ;)
     
  40. Grazie joan e curiosone:). G.I. Joe era popolarissimo anche in Italia, una specie di Barbie per maschietti!:) Poi purtroppo è stato soppiantato dall'odiosissimo Big Jim:(
     
  41. silvialxk

    silvialxk Senior Member

    Italy
    Italian
  42. WordsWordWords Senior Member

    Piemonte, Italy
    Am English
    Hi silvialxk,

    Hilarious but true -- thank you! :D

    The only clarification I'd like to add is that for the "hamper", the image the site gave for the US is what I'd call a "laundry basket", while the hamper would be where I put dirty clothes before they go into the machine to be washed -- the difference is that there's a cover.

    Like this: (for example): http://image.normthompson.com/solutions/images/us/local/products/detail/88455.jpg
    and this: http://fourthfloorwalkup.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/child-wicker-laundry-hamper-fb.jpg

    See also here (second paragraph):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamper

    So in BrE what is this container for laundry called?
     
  43. Tegs

    Tegs Mód ar líne

    Wales
    English (Ireland), Welsh, Irish
    I’d call that a laundry basket.

    A lot of the words in Silvia's link don’t have a straight AE/BE division – many of the AE meanings are also used in BE (e.g. braces, hooker etc)
     
  44. CPA Senior Member

    Rome
    British English/Italian - bilingual
    "Braces" brings to mind AE "suspenders" which brings to mind suspenders for ladies' stockings and men's socks........ :D
     
  45. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    I haven't heard "bird" to mean a woman for years! But maybe it's because I live outside the UK...

    About trolley: what do the Americans call that thing you push around in the supermarket?
    They call a tram a trolley? It reminds me that also in GB a trolley-bus is/was a bus powered from overhead cables but running on tyres, not rails (in Italian "filobus").
    And for the Italians a trolley is exclusively a suitcase with wheels.
     
  46. WordsWordWords Senior Member

    Piemonte, Italy
    Am English
    Hi Einstein!

    At the supermarket I use a "shopping cart".
    :)
     
  47. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    It's still used, for sure.;)
     
  48. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    Me too--or even just cart.

    In AE trolley is a synonym of streetcar (un tram).
     
  49. Einstein

    Einstein Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    UK, English
    To my British ear the word cart brings this to mind.:D

    Did you see what I said above about trams/trolleys? Here's a trolleybus. But for us a tram is a tram, not a trolley and not a streetcar either, unless it's named Desire.:D
     
  50. wildan1

    wildan1 Moderando ma non troppo

    A trackless trolley is what I see in the linked photo. Nowadays they are very rare in the US.

    Otherwise a streetcar, trolley and tram are all synonyms in AE. More modern ones are also known as light rail.

    Usage of these terms may be regional across the US.
     
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