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Thanks for the heads up.

Discussion in 'English Only' started by pbasil, Sep 23, 2005.

  1. pbasil Junior Member

    Spanish (Spain)
    Hi,

    I was told that on a chat and I am still wondering what the meaning was.
    Not sure whether it maybe was:

    "Thanks for the head´s up"

    Thanks, p.
     
  2. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Hi pbasil,

    Have a look at THIS THREAD where the meaning of "heads up" was explained.

    The expression is heads up - no apostrophe. You got it right in the thread title:)
     
  3. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    No apostrophe, but I think there should be a hyphen.

    Thanks for the heads-up.
     
  4. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I bow to greater knowledge of the expression:)
    For me, "heads-up" or "heads up" is a business jargon expression that I had never heard until I came across it here.
    Shortly after, I heard it for real:eek:
     
  5. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    What a surprise. :)

    At least in the United States, it's quite a common expression - and on a daily basis, at that.
     
  6. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Nobody here or in the other thread mentioned the most-likely origin of the term. It comes from baseball, which also might account for its being a mostly AE expression.

    Baseball can be dangerous to the fans as well as the players, as the ball is frequently hit into the crowd-- and a well-hit hardball could really do damage to its unexpecting target. I'm surprised the insurance "industry" hasn't shut the national pastime down by now.

    Anyway, when the game isn't all that exciting, sometimes fans get wrapped up socializing in their subgroups, and don't exactly have their eye on the ball. You see a pitch fouled off into the stands and it's coming right into the midst of such a group, and if they're within earshot you yell "Heads up!" and hopefully people react correctly (if illogically)-- by ducking!

    A military synonym for "heads up" is "incoming!" A better choice for a situation where literally sticking your head up might be a bad idea.
     
  7. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    A synonym for "heads up" would be "warning".
     
  8. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    You may be correct Elroy, but never in my ball-playing days, nor in moments of attendence at MLB events, have I ever heard anyone yell Heads Hyphen Up. And Uncle Google likes it hyphen-free 6,700,000 vs a mere 4,490,000 with the interloper.

    Given those figures for attendence, I'd have to say the twin bill was split.

    Now, to the fun part. Assuming you are correct, given your fine ERA [Earned Run Average or English Reasoning Ability] could you tell us what farm club the hyphen played for? {What's the etymology, with the hyphen}

    Is this just a grapefruit league usage?
     
  9. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    Ahh...

    I always wondered about the origin of the term (to mean "warning")! It all comes together now.
     
  10. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Like hickory and a slow curve ball;)
     
  11. elroy

    elroy Motley mod

    Urbana-Champaign, IL
    Am. English, Pal. Arabic (See profile)
    There's nothing that suggests those 2,210,000 hits (or more) don't involve the usage of the two words "heads" and "up" in other grammatical functions.

    When an expression becomes a noun in its own right, it is more often than not the case that it gets hyphenated. In fact, non-traditional made-up I'm-gonna-be-cool-and-try-something-different combinations attest to the tendency as well.
     
  12. foxfirebrand

    foxfirebrand Senior Member

    The Northern Rockies
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Elroy-- I agree with you about hyphenation, by the way. "Thanks for the heads-up" is a correction I'd make myself.

    I didn't make that clear in my post, because as an interjection, it doesn't take a hyphen. But if you use a two-word interjection as an adjective or noun, it needs a hyphen.

    "That was good heads-up play." (everyone was alert, on-the-ball).
    "Thanks for the heads-up."

    "I loved the movie. Two thumbs up!"
    "I'll give it a thumbs-up, with a couple of minor qualifications."

    "Keep your eye on the ball."
    "You were on-the-ball as usual at the sales meeting. When I okayed the original plan for the promotional event I was aware that turkeys can't fly, but I didn't connect the dots. Thanks for speaking up-- you singlehandedly averted a real fiasco."
     
  13. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Just to note that heads-up still isn't entirely familiar in BE (well, in my BE).
    To me it is another of those strange US business jargon blow-ins - although having heard it used by real people here I have come to tolerate it:)
     
  14. Strider Senior Member

    France
    England, English
    Just to throw everyone into confusion...

    I thought this expression came from a piece of military equipment - the Head Up Display pilot's helmet. However, the meaning of the expression 'heads up' more or less remains the same, that someone is given information (like a pilot sees information in his helmet visor).
     

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