That aside vs. Be that as it may

Discussion in 'English Only' started by kate123, Oct 8, 2009.

  1. kate123 Senior Member

    USA,English
    Hello everyone,

    Here is the context:



    The technique is based on a procedure already performed on many embryos conceived thorugh in vitro fertilization. Very early in the embryo's life, a reseracher removes a single cell, leaving the rest of the embryo intact. Although this method has generally been used to test for genetic diseases before the embryo is implanted in the mother, researchers at ACT have discovered that the single cell can be used to generate stem cells. This might assuage critics of embryonic stem cell research whose opposition was grounded on the fact that such research used to require destruction of the embryo, althought some are expressing concerns about any procedure that would exploit an embryo for research.



    _______, there certainly is a political dimensions to this breakthrough.
    In August 2001, President Bush announced that he ws cutting off federal
    funding for research on any embryonic stem cell lines that might be developed after that point. Ever since, his detractors in both parties have tried to paint him and his pro-life supporters as medical Luddites inhibiting the progress of science to indulge their quaint religious convictions. Just last month, Congress staged a showdown, passing an embryonic-stem-cell funding bill that resulted in the first veto of Mr. Bush's tenure.


    What goes in the blank - 'Be that as it may' or 'That aside'? Which expression is the correct one to use in this context?
    I am confused because I think that they're pretty much the same in meaning.

    Thanks
     
  2. liliput

    liliput Senior Member

    Spain
    U.K. English
    I wouldn't use "be that as it may" here, because you are really changing the subject not providing a contrast.
     
  3. Bookmom

    Bookmom Senior Member

    It may just be my ear, but that aside and be that as it may, sound somewhat lightweight in conjuntion with such a powerful development. How about critcism notwithstanding or the fact remains (despite the opposition.)
     
  4. kate123 Senior Member

    USA,English
    well,it's a multiple-choice question and you're supposed to choose between the two answer choices. I find the question rather odd and illogical. I posted this question because I wanted to know if I'm missing something. To my knowledge, the two expressions are exactly the same in meaning.
     
  5. liliput

    liliput Senior Member

    Spain
    U.K. English
    I don't think they are the same. "Be that as it may" is like saying "even though the previous statement may be true..." whereas "that aside" is more like "ignoring the previous statements for a moment...".

    That is why I would choose "that aside" - the text moves from technical details and ethical criticisms onto the political side of things. It's not saying "even though this, that" it's saying "we've talked about that side of things, now let's talk about another side of it".
     
  6. kate123 Senior Member

    USA,English
    hmmm...yes, I see what you're talking about. Thank you so much for clearing that up. :) But incidentally, the answer is Be that as it may. Taking your opinion into account, about the small difference between the two expressions, I think the answe is 'be that as it may' because of the two possibilities stated in the last sentence that comes before the blank in the second paragraph. Because there are unanswered conclusions about the critics' opinions on embryonic research.

    and also, I should've mentioned that there's another paragraph that comes before the two paragraphs I've posted-it's about the political situation involving embryonic research
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2009
  7. kate123 Senior Member

    USA,English
    liliput,there's another question on this passage that's bothering me,though -if you don't mind, would you offer me your feedback on it?
    Here's the question: The new technique is innocuous to the embryo-true or false?

    (the answer is FALSE but I don't see how the information provided in the passage can lead to the conclusion that the technique is innocuous to the embryo)
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2009
  8. liliput

    liliput Senior Member

    Spain
    U.K. English
    I would say it's true, the technique is innocuous, because the passage seems to imply that a cell is removed without harming the embryo.
    (1) It tells us that one cell is removed leaving the rest intact.
    (2) It tells us that the technique is used for genetic testing before implanting embryos. Presumably they would not implant damaged embryos.
     
  9. kate123 Senior Member

    USA,English
    yes that's what I thought as well. The technique should be innocuous to the embryo. I don't understand why it says that this is false.
     

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