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That being said vs Having said that vs That said

Discussion in 'English Only' started by brighthope, Jan 5, 2011.

  1. brighthope Senior Member

    Toronto
    Japanese
    That being said, Having said that and That said are all used before saying or writing something contrary to what you have just said/written (meaning "however"). I have also seen "That having being said." Maybe there are more variations for this.

    My question;
    Can I just use them interchangeably?
    No preferences between formal and informal, spoken and written, AE and BE etc.?

    Thank you.

    (To the moderators) I've found a thread which is asking and answering the meaning of "that being said". I thought asking about the differences of these similar expressions would deserve another thread.That being said :D, if I should add this question to that thread, or another thread on this topic exists please kindly let me know.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2011
  2. Tazzler Senior Member

    Maryland
    American English
    First off, "that having being said" is not correct. "that having been said" is however.

    If you use "having said that", then the subject of "say" must follow. Not the case with the other expressions.

    As for the difference between "that said, that being said, that having been said" I don't really see one. "that said" should be the best option because why use four words when you can use two?
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2011
  3. JulianStuart

    JulianStuart Senior Member

    Sonoma County CA
    English (UK then US)
    I think "That having been said" is getting a little clumsy but the other three are OK. The second one specifically requires the speaker or writer to be the subject of the following part of the sentence "Having said that, I ...." while the other two are stand-alone clauses with passive form and can sit next to the subsequent part of the sentence. The meanings are all the same, that what follows might challenge or seem to contrast with what was previously said. They function much as "however" would.
     
  4. Parla Senior Member

    New York City
    English - US
    Could we see some examples?
     
  5. brighthope Senior Member

    Toronto
    Japanese
    In my original thought they were exchangeable. So my example sentence would be what I wrote in my original post to the moderators.
    However, according to Julian's explanation, it is not correct to say "Having said that" in this situation? (I started the next sentence with "if" - I've found a thread which is asking and answering the meaning of "that being said". I thought asking about the differences of these similar expressions would deserve another thread.That being said :D (Having said that :cross:?) , if I should add this question to that thread, or another thread on this topic exists please kindly let me know. )


    I did not understand this part. Did you mean that grammatically somehow "that having being seen" is wrong but "that having been said" is correct in contrast?

    (Edit) Tazzler edited/corrected this part (Thank you!). And, actually It was a typo on my part too. I meant to write "That having been said", not "that having being said"

    Thanks again!
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2011
  6. EStjarn

    EStjarn Senior Member

    Spanish
    To me there's a sense of relief when this expression is used, as though it had been complicated or taxing to say something. I would expect it to follow a discourse, not a single sentence. Because the preceding text here is so brief, I'm not sure I would use either variant. If forced to choose one, I'd prefer the short version - 'that said' - because its brevity best parallels the brevity of the preceding text.

    My impression is that 'having said that' and 'that being said' are somewhat more formal-sounding than 'that said'.

    ~ Note that there's a variant, 'having said all that', which might just be the full form of 'having said that'.
     
  7. sweet caramels New Member

    english
    thinking about it, is "that being said" grammatically correct? Since being refers to a process, aren't the 2 gramatically constructions "that said" or "that having been said"?
     
  8. crazybrava Junior Member

    English - US; Spanish - Argentina
    I think you're right, and 'that having been said' is clunky but wouldn't it be grammatically acceptable if you're recounting something that happened in the past?

    For example: nobody wanted to bring up the real issue but after a while someone blurted out that their colleague was completely incapable. That having been said, it was impossible to ignore the fact that she would have to be let go.

    It doesn't sound pretty to me but is it wrong?
     

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