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the decision was already almost taken/made/settled/done

Discussion in 'English Only' started by loureed4, Apr 5, 2013.

  1. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Hello,

    I am trying to figure out which verb fits best in this context:

    "I didn´t have to think much about it, the decision was already almost taken/made/settled/done."

    To me, all except "taken" seem fine, but I am not so certain.

    Thanks in advance!! :)
     
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I like "made" the best out of the choices you've supplied, loureed4. "Settled" is also good. I don't care much for "taken" and "done" in that sentence.
     
  3. GMF1991 Senior Member

    Cork, Ireland
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    The most common verb for a decision is "make", all of the following examples are common phrases in English (at least in the UK):
    to make a decision
    Decision making ability
    Decision makers.

    You can't really use any of the others in my opinion...

    :)
     
  4. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    I see owlman5 (I like the nickname).

    In my view, "settled" is more formal?. Maybe this is one of those "made" versus "done" stuff I struggle with, hehe.

    Thanks a lot Owlman!! :)
     
  5. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Yes, it is true!! , "I have to make a decision", I hadn´t thought of this. Anyway, not even settled you think is right?

    Thanks a lot!
     
  6. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    You're quite welcome, loureed4. As GMF mentioned, "make" and "decision" are generally used together. "Matter" and "settled" are used together far more often than "decision" and "settled". If your objective is to produce a sentence that sounds ordinary, "made" is your best choice.
     
  7. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Thanks a lot again Owlman! :):)
     
  8. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    I think you were given good suggestions.

    Here is a relevant thread: Take a decision or make a decision

    I would always use 'make', but as the thread shows, some speakers of BE use 'take' --- as does the BBC, I've noticed. However, I see from GMF's post that not all speakers of BE would. :)
     
  9. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Cagey, this is great! .

    English is lovely (and sometimes crazy, hehe) due to the regionalisms, which are part of the language as in Spain, and I´d dare to say, in every single language.

    It´s so great you brought up this nuance about "take" being used in BrE. THANKS A LOT!! :)
     
  10. GMF1991 Senior Member

    Cork, Ireland
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    I personally would never use "Settled" with "decision". Although, when saying "that's decided then" for a group decision, you can say "That's settled then."

    Yes, now you mention it, "take a decision" is used in BE, but it is more formal than "make" and thus less common.

    English, what a weird language... :p
     
  11. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Thanks a lot GMF1991 for your accurate and great explanations!.

    P.S: Maybe if I knew Swedish, Danish or Turkish I could say (as many people do): "English is so easy", hehe.

    In movies, I see a lot: "That settles it!" , and through the context and exposure it was easy to conclude its meaning.

    THANKS!!
     
  12. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    In the original sentence, the word 'almost' restricts the choice of verb.

    'Done' is wrong in any case.
    Both 'make' and 'take' are common in general. They express the decision as result.
    ('Take' expresses the sense of responsibility involved better than the more general term 'make'.)

    However, when you say 'almost', we need a word which expresses not just the result but the process.
    Therefore 'settled' is the best choice in the original sentence.
     
  13. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Interesting,

    So, a boss takes a very important decision rather than he makes an important decision, because he holds responsibility for such decision. ? .

    Thanks wandle!
     
  14. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    Be careful!
    This does not mean that 'take' is used when a boss makes a decision.

    It means that 'take' is used when we want to express the responsibility involved.
    (Notice how I have just said 'makes a decision': no special sense of responsibility involved.)
     
  15. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Ops! , if the "boss example" doesn´t work, I am just not getting it right.

    Thanks a lot!
     
  16. wandle

    wandle Senior Member

    London
    English - British
    It is a question of the intention of the writer or speaker.
    In this sentence, the word 'makes' is appropriate because I, the writer, was not attaching any special sense of responsibility to the decision: I was simply referring to a decision in general.

    Here are a few examples of the verb 'to take' (from Americans, by the way):

    Hans de Beaufort
    I need not go into the reasons why I took the decision to leave in February; I only want to explain why I didn't let you know.

    Digital Devices
    Some years ago I took the decision to begin with RC models. Therefore there was a need to use computer based simulator for learning of control.

    Relationships & Secrets - The Girl Spot
    Dec 30, 2010 – When my girlfriend and I took the decision to be together, time was something we didn't have.
     
  17. loureed4 Senior Member

    Spain
    Spanish
    Thanks wandle! . Thanks a lot for the three examples. I have to think a bit about all of this, to put together all the ideas.

    Many thanks for your very kind and great replies!
     

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