the heat is on

Discussion in 'Italian-English' started by Necsus, Mar 13, 2007.

  1. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    I thought I've finished with 'Hot Fuzz', but there is the trailer!
    Could you suggest how I can translate these two phrases of narrative?
    In this thread the second one (in bold the offending sentence):

    When the heat is on... you got to call the fuzz.
     
  2. Paulfromitaly

    Paulfromitaly MODerator

    Brescia (Italy)
    Italian
    Quando la faccenda si fa scottante, devi fare un fischio alla polizia. (se fuzz può essere la polizia nel tuo contesto).
     
  3. Poianone

    Poianone Senior Member

    Udine, Italy
    Italian, Italy
    Hi Necsus, could you add a bit more context? I could suggest "Quando la febbre sale... è ora di chiamare la madama/polizia/pula/piedipiatti", but I fear I'm groping in the darkness... Throw me a lightner!!!
     
  4. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Grazie, Paul. E' di polizia che si parla, sì.
    Grazie, Poianone. E' uno speaker, non c'è altro contesto, ma se ti interessa puoi vedere il trailer su Internet (non posso darti io un link, come Elisabetta mi ha fatto notare).
     
  5. TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    "When the heat is on" typically means "when you're feeling under pressure." (See List I here.) In this case, there may be a play on words involved as well, because "heat" is sometimes slang for police, just as "fuzz" is.

    Elisabetta
     
  6. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    Well spotted! But, just to be pedantic (for a change....), "heat" is pretty much inseparable (I believe) from the definite article "the"...

    "the heat" = the fuzz = (the) cops
     
  7. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Ecco, sentivo la mancanza dei giochi di parole...!;)
     
  8. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    "When the heat is on" - a more principal meaning (sorry Elisabetta!) is used to describe when a lot of stuff is happening and things might start to get dangerous.

    Say two groups of people arrange for a big brawl or something, as both groups arrive and after someone does something that provokes the other group, and it might get violent, that is when "the heat is on" - a description of a situation to do with imminent danger.

    This is the only way I've ever heard it and it fits well with the following "call the fuzz" - as you would in the situation described above.

    I still keep meaning to see that film!
     
  9. TrentinaNE Senior Member

    USA
    English (American)
    Yes, I've heard it that way, too, Alex. Thanks. :)

    Elisabetta
     
  10. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    I am not sure if you yanks are aware it is a British film that has just been released, and because of that, it's more obvious to a Brit what the whole slogan meant, so that's why I posted:)
     
  11. Necsus

    Necsus Senior Member

    Formello (Rome)
    Italian (Italy)
    Thanks verymuch, Alex!
     
  12. DAH

    DAH Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    USA/California--English
    Anche "the man"

    In AE, diciamo: it's time to throw down.
     
  13. Alxmrphi Senior Member

    Reykjavík, Ísland
    UK English
    Isn't "the man" the government, organised establishment etc?
     
  14. DAH

    DAH Senior Member

    Los Angeles
    USA/California--English
    Not as I knew it. When my generation used "the man" it was a long time ago. But, maybe today it means whatever!
     
  15. lsp

    lsp Senior Member

    NY
    US, English
    I think you're both right, Alex and DAH. The Man = traditional authority, be it the police or organized government.
     
  16. mcsittel New Member

    Nebraska, USA
    English - US
    Ciao,

    I am trying to translate the phrase "the heat is on". Our city's minor league hockey team, the Omaha Lancers, plays the song "The Heat Is On" by Glenn Frey when a goal is scored and at other celebratory times during each game. Our team has an Italian player on it and I'd like to create a sign to hold up at games with this phrase correctly written in Italian.

    The Google translator suggests "Il calore é in", but I'm wondering if "Il calore é acceso" is closer to the correct phrase. I would appreciate any and all suggestions!

    Grazie,
    Matt
     
  17. Hi mcsittel I would suggest "Il gioco si fa duro" as a free translation. I don't think any literal translation could really work here.

    Quando il
    gioco si fa duro is the proper translation for when the going get tough, but I'm sorry I can't find anything better than this...

    By the way, the song "The Heat is On" has been very popular in Italy, even more than The Eagles themselves, so I don't think an Italian would associate the title of the song with any particular translation, it's just... "The Heat Is On"!

    I hope someone comes to top my idea...
     
  18. King Crimson

    King Crimson Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    Italiano
    Agree with chipulukusu, the title of this thread immediately conjured up the song by Glenn Frey (even though I wouldn't go so far as to say that the song was more popular than the group;)) and also an episode from "Miami Vice" featuring this song.
    Also for the translation I agree with chipulukusu: for the purpose to be shown during a game, Quando il gioco si fa duro is your best bet.
     
  19. Hi King, I should have been warned by your nick to show more respect for a group from the Age of Gold! :)
     
  20. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    'The heat is on' was neither written nor sung by the Eagles as a group: it's Glenn Frey singing solo.;) And by the way, it's from the soundtrack of Beverly Hills Cop ,:) although it has been used in various TV series (Miami Vice, as you say, KC), adverts etc. over the years.

    I see our AE friends mention that heat is sometimes slang for the fuzz (gli sbirri), which fits in with the fact that the song was written for a US cop movie, but I tend to think of it as meaning 'pressure'. i.e you are under pressure to do well under maybe difficult circumstances. I think Quando il gioco si fa duro gets that idea across fairly well.;)
     
  21. curiosone

    curiosone Senior Member

    Romagna, Italy
    AE - hillbilly ;)
    :thumbsup: You took the words out of my mouth, LC! :) An alternative (perhaps easier to read, on a sign held up during a game, and in tune with the context of celebrating a goal, and putting the other team into difficulty) might be: "Spingiamo al massimo!" or "Li mettiamo sotto torchio!" (also because there's another song that goes "when the going gets tough, the tough get going" which "quando il gioco si fa duro" reminds me of).
     
  22. King Crimson

    King Crimson Senior Member

    Milano, Italia
    Italiano
    Er... I guess chipulukusu and I should wear sackcloth and ashes for our musical blunder:eek:. The only thing I can say in my defence is that I should have been already in bed (and sleeping) by the time I wrote that post...
     
  23. Why King? You got it right saying what it was a Glenn Frey's song... As for me, my reference to the Eagles was because, as a die-hard fan, I still can't accept that one member used the celebrity derived from The Eagles to make money with a commercial, easy-listening, condiscendent song!

    I know... I'm a bit of a Taliban when it comes to good old music:)
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2013
  24. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    In that case, why do you listen to the Eagles? :eek:
    ;)

    EDIT: Just kiddin'!
     
  25. That's a VERY good one! I have a lot to learn from you!:)
     
  26. GavinW Senior Member

    Italy
    British English
    I dunno, I was a bit rude, actually, but I thought I'd risk it... Thanks for taking it so well!

    This message will self-destruct in about 90 seconds, after the Mods have deleted it as off-topic chat! ;-)
     
  27. mcsittel New Member

    Nebraska, USA
    English - US
    Grazie, I think I'll go with "Li mettiamo sotto torchio!" It has a nice ring to it, and doesn't remind me of Billy Ocean's "When the Going Gets Tough" either! :) Still accepting any phrases that might get this or a similar feeling across; one can never have too many signs in foreign languages!
     

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