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the period of 90 minutes

Discussion in 'English Only' started by rosecan, Nov 20, 2006.

  1. rosecan New Member

    Turkey/Turkish
    how can we say the period of 90 minutes? ıs it trues? 'one and half hour'
    and ı want to practise English on msn . Is it possible with you?
    thanks
     
  2. evilregis Senior Member

    English, Canada
    90 minutes can be expressed as:

    one hour and a half (not very common)
    one and a half hours (more common)
     
  3. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    Hi

    I would say / write "one and a half hours"

    but, really, in speech it would sound more like "one un alf hours"

    I don't do msn - maybe there is a section in here which deals with making internet connections, I don't know.

    You would also get more response to your msn request if you start a new thread with that in the title.
     
  4. GEmatt

    GEmatt Senior Member

    La Côte, Switzerland
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    Hi,
    I most often hear "an hour and a half"...
     
  5. susantash Senior Member

    Montevideo
    Español de Uruguay
    Interesting! :cool:
    I've always said the first one.
    I'd like to know which version people from other English speaking regions prefer. :)

    Thanks a lot!
     
  6. Actually, I think a lot of non-native speakers make this mistake... as far as I know, one hour and a half is not correct at all. I may however be wrong (it happens:) ).
     
  7. susantash Senior Member

    Montevideo
    Español de Uruguay
    Hi everyone!

    I've just googled both expressions and I found "one and a half hour" is more common (335,000 vs. 107.000).
    However I didn't check where those pages come from. maybe they're mainly from the USA and that explains the results.
    My point is, to say that sth. is more common than anything else maybe we should talk about regions. (XX is more commonly heard in XX English)

    Hope this helps!
     
  8. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    I'm deleting because I think I was talking at cross purposes!
     
  9. You may be right, but it always sounds very incorrect to my ears... But I will not insist on the point, because I have absolutely no proof to back me up! :D
     
  10. suzi br

    suzi br Senior Member

    Stoke on Trent
    England and English
    Please don't call my answers "rubbish" , especially in a thread where it is clear we have a variety of opinions and possibilities.

    Adding a smiley to it still doesn't make it a good comment in my eyes.
     
  11. The Singularity Junior Member

    English , Canada
    Actually no. You use "An" anytime a word has a vowel sound at the beginning of the word (I wont go into what the vowel sounds are, most of them are pretty obvious, however, please note that just simply because a word starts with an 'A' does not mean one uses the word "An"). That is the official rule that works everytime.

    For instance: "A half", "A horse", "An hour", "An apple"
     
  12. GEmatt

    GEmatt Senior Member

    La Côte, Switzerland
    English/BE, Français/CH, Deutsch/CH (rustier & rustier)
    Wrong, sadly. It depends on the stress of the word beginning with 'h'. I'm sure there's a thread here on it (or maybe I read it on wikipedia)

    A history
    An historian

    all depends
     
  13. Methinks that "an" is only used when the "h" is not voiced. When it is voiced, then it acts as a consonant.

    An hour
    A history book/a half (in AE, we hear the "h" in half, perhaps not so in BE?)

    But some folks do it otherwise... Yes, I'm sure there's a thread on that here somewhere!
     
  14. ash93

    ash93 Senior Member

    London
    England, United Kingdom - English but can speak Urdu, Memon and Hindi
    An hour and a half
    One and a half hours (which makes perfect sense Aruthapete - lol)
    You could also say One hour and thirty minutes

    PM me for my msn
     

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