The same to you vs you too

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Antonio, Apr 23, 2005.

  1. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Hi Group,

    When you wanna wish the same thing to someone you say in English as an answer "the same to you" and "you too" My main question is this, when do I have to use the first one or the second one as an answer? both expressions have the same meaning or not? "you too" is a shorten form of "the same to you"?
     
  2. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    Yes, they have the same meaning, and I think they can be used interchangeably. "The same to you" is a bit more formal, but it doesn't sound weird to use it informally or anything.
     
  3. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Thanks Markus, now can someone please, give me some examples using both expressions "the same to you" and "you too"? Just to undertand the usage and the application of both expressions?
     
  4. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    John: That will be $19.99.
    Mary: Here you go.
    John: Thank you, have a good night!
    Mary: You too! / Same to you!

    I really can't think of an example where one would be appropriate and the other one wouldn't be, I think they're pretty much interchangeable. Maybe someone else can.
     
  5. Eddie

    Eddie Senior Member

    Nassau County, NY
    USA - English
    Hi, Antonio!

    Here's some input from south of the Canadian border. I agree with Markus. Both expressions are used interchangeably in New York City (my turf). I use both all the time.

    You might be interested to know that there is a third expression that's used a great deal in NYC: You do the same!
     
  6. garryknight Senior Member

    Kent, UK
    UK, English
    And then there's the one that ends with "and the horse you rode in on!". :)
     
  7. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Well I guess, I can help out with this example:

    Kevin: So Matt, are you going to see Leslie tonight?
    Matt: You betcha.
    Kevin: Well, Good Luck on your first date.
    Matt: Thanks Man, you too.

    Which of these two is the correct one "The same to you" or "same to you" without the "the". If you know another example of how to use this expressions "same to you" and "you too", please let me know.
     
  8. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    None of them, because Kevin won't met any girl tonight, will he?

    That's the first time I HAD TO correct "going to" to "gonna", because you already used "betcha". It doesn't sound good, one formal and one informal. And I believe the better way is "I bet you" instead of "You bet you", isn't it?
     
  9. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    Antonio, in your example, all three work: "you too", "same to you", and "the same to you". We often just take out the "the" because we (like all languages) are lazy in spoken English.
     
  10. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    Whodunit, you are wrong on one thing. "You betcha" was correct, it's an expression, a colloquial synonym of "definitely". Maybe it's not grammatical but it's the expression that is used.

    But you are right about the "you too" not being correct in this context, I didn't notice that. Some may find it interesting that this is a common problem among English speakers, at least where I live: We are so accustomed to saying "You too" that we use it in inappropriate places! For example:

    Dan: So, I hear you're going to France!
    Paul: I sure am!
    Dan: Well, have an awesome time.
    Paul: Thanks, you too! Err... I mean... thanks!
     
  11. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Are you sure? It sounds funny to use twice 'you' in a sentence consisting of three words. Look here. But it can be right what you said: If it's alone (a sentence itself), it should be 'you betcha' and if there's following something, we should use 'I betcha'.

    Let's wait for the natives.
     
  12. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    I am positive (I am a native English speaker).

    You use "You betcha" in a sentence by itself. It's an expression, a synonym of "definitely".

    And you are right, if there is something following you would use "I betcha". Eg:
    I betcha (that) I can juggle three eggs!

    However in this case "I betcha" is just short for "I bet you". "You betcha" is nothing but an expression; if it is lengthened to "You bet you" it makes no sense.
     
  13. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Of course, you're a native English speaker. I didn't realize it; I thought I'd still talk to Antonio; don't ask me why!!!

    Okay, that is why I asked: You bet you. Is there such another expression where the lengthened form makes no sense?
     
  14. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    I'm not sure! In fact, I had never actually thought about the expression "You betcha" until this thread. ;) Maybe someone else can think of one...
     
  15. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    whodunit,

    Please don't take offense to what I say but I can't help myself. So, in advance: sorry.
    I would never correct someone for saying going to instead of gonna. Going to is correct. Gonna is not. Many people say it but only through lack of proper diction.
     
  16. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    I know that it is wrong! That's why I said
    I didn't want to correct it, but Antonio used "betcha", so I THOUGHT it would sound weird to use 'betcha' AND preceding 'going to'.
     
  17. Antonio Senior Member

    Monterrey
    Mexico/Spanish
    Can someone think of another situation or example using "you too" and "same to you"? Markus you're right, I learned in English one phrase that I'II never forget, "the shorter, the better" that means, that if you add less words in a phrase or expression, the most faster and natural you will be seen and heard among native English speakers.
     
  18. VenusEnvy

    VenusEnvy Senior Member

    Maryland, USA
    English, United States
    Nicole: Good luck on the exam, Antonio!
    Antonio: The same to you! Good luck!

    Nilda: Nicole, I really love your new shirt!
    Nicole: The same to you! I like your shirt, too. Where did you get yours?

    Cashier: Thank you ma'am, and have a great day.
    Client: Thanks, the same to you.

    Gary: It was really nice seeing you after all of these years.
    Nicole: Yah, (it was good to see) you too.

    Nicole: I'm sorry I can't go out with you tonight. I have to go to a movie with my little sister.
    Agnes: That's ok. Well, have fun!
    Nicole: You too Agnes!

    (I like being in the situations. :p )

    :warning: :warning: :warning:
    Mean man #1: Screw you, man! I knew you slept with my girlfriend!
    Mean man #2: Yah, well, you slept with my girlfriend, too!
    Mean man #1: You're nothing but a peice of trash. Screw you!
    Mean man #2: The same to you, jerk!

    (Sorry everyone, but I think it's justified!)
     
  19. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    The only long form of this that I can think of is..

    'Are you going out with Markus tonight?'..
    'You bet your bottom dollar!'...
    'Are you going out with Markus tonight?'
    'You betcha!'...
    It is just an affirmative..it means yes...

    te gato;)
     
  20. Eddie

    Eddie Senior Member

    Nassau County, NY
    USA - English
    Antonio,

    As a native, I can say that there was nothing wrong with what you wrote:


    I understand why Whodunit insisted on consistency, but there were no mistakes.

    You asked when to say, the same to you and same to you. You can use either one at any time. The second form is just a shorter way of saying the first form. It falls in the same category as saying, I thank you for your help and thank you for your help.
     
  21. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Well, okay. I understand your comment, but let me ask a question again:

    Wouldn't it have been better to say "I bet you?" in written English? Or "gonna" in spoken English?
     
  22. Eddie

    Eddie Senior Member

    Nassau County, NY
    USA - English
    Whodunit,

    In answer to your question to me. I bet you doesn't mean the same thing as You betcha.

    If you're gambling, you would say I bet you....
    You betcha means, You can be sure of it.

    No native would every say, You bet you.

    Gonna , is very popular with most New Yorkers (I can't speak for other cities), including me. It's just a lazy pronunciation.
     
  23. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    One comment to make about gonna. It can only be used to replace going to when to is part of the infinitive verb. It can never be used when to is a preposition. Example:

    I'm gonna study soon, once I get off this forum.:tick:
    I'm gonna the store.:cross:

    Random factoid: This is how I discovered that in the phrase I'm going to sleep native speakers consider sleep a place that we are going to, not a verb. If we considered it a verb, we would use I'm gonna sleep, but this usually sounds weird. It sometimes sounds okay, but only when your brain has designated sleep as a verb, e.g., I'm gonna sleep in the car.

    Markus
     
  24. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    Also, to reply to whodunit, there is really no situation in which gonna works and going to does not. If someone were to say Are you going to see your girlfriend tomorrow?, I would not think that they were being overly formal, no matter how informal the situation. I would just think that they were in the mood to enunciate that particular sentence correctly.
     
  25. VenusEnvy

    VenusEnvy Senior Member

    Maryland, USA
    English, United States
    Interesting. I thought about this for a little while. :idea:
    "I'm gonna sleep" doesn't sound right. However, I do say, "I'm gonna go to sleep." :thumbsup:
     
  26. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    That is clear, because 'gonna' is just a shortened form of the future 'going to'.

    And it's also very clear that the same statement isn't correct vice versa. Thanks anyway.
     
  27. Markus

    Markus Senior Member

    Paris, France
    Canada - English
    Whodunit, you asked:

    That's what I was replying to.
     
  28. Whodunit

    Whodunit Senior Member

    กรุงเทพมหานคร
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    Ah, you should have quoted me. ;) No matter, I know what you mean and why you felt offended by my reply. Sorry.
     
  29. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Kevin: So Matt, are you going to see Leslie tonight?
    Matt: You betcha.
    Kevin: Well, Good Luck on your first date.
    Matt: Thanks Man, you too.

    Hey Eddie;
    Aummm..are you sure?..the way I read it ..
    Kevin is asking Matt if he is going to see Leslie..(so good so far)..
    You betcha..(yes)..
    Well, Good Luck..(your gonna need it)..
    Thanks Man (thank you), you too..(the you too makes it sound like Kevin is going out on a first date as well..but that is not specified, maybe both of them are going out with Leslie..) so it sound a little out of place to me..It is not wrong..just out of place..

    te gato;)
     
  30. Nick

    Nick Senior Member

    Western USA
    USA, English
    More likely it is just out of context.

    But yes, if you say "you too", then it implys that both people are going on their first date. If this isn't what you intended to say, remove this phrase.
     
  31. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hey Nick;
    Ahummm...
    That is what I said in my Alberta English..:D
    Please refer to the quote below..

    Quote:..(from some chick in Alberta)...
    you too..(the you too makes it sound like Kevin is going out on a first date as well..but that is not specified, maybe both of them are going out with Leslie..) so it sound a little out of place to me..It is not wrong..just out of place..

    te gato;)
     
  32. atlantaguy33 Junior Member

    USA English
    Someone addressed this earlier but thought it beared repeating. "Same to you" can also be a negative response. For instance if someone called you a vulgar name, you might reply "same to you!" For some reason, it is usually followed by "buddy!"

    "You betcha" is just a butchering of the phrase "you bet your..." with several examples of possible endings-- you bet your life; You bet your ass; You bet your sweet bippy; You bet your bottom dollar. "You betcha" tends to be more of a midwestern US thing I think. Down south we would probably just say "you bet." It is very similar to "How do you do" being butchered into "Howdy."

    I often catch myself sticking a "you too!" on a response even though it isn't really appropriate. It's just a side effect of being raised to be overly polite.
    "Have a nice trip." "Thanks, you too!" even though the person isn't going anywhere.
     
  33. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hey atlantaguy;
    'You betcha'!!!!:D
    but not a US thing alone..we say it here all the time...
    as for 'same to you'!...yes it is also used for negitive answers..but we do not add the 'buddy'..occasionally something harsher is added..but only when they can not hear you..and a specific finger on your hand is used...

    te gato;)
     
  34. mzsweeett

    mzsweeett Senior Member

    USA
    USA, American English
    And I have yet another item to add to this "going to" list....
    VenusEnvy, where I have lived, we also are commonly heard saying " goin' instead of going to.
    As in "I'm goin' to sleep. "
    I also have been prone to saying "you too", etc. I think that they all can be taken either as a positive or a negative, depending on the tone of voice and situation.
    Suffice to say that many english speaking people tend to shorten their language for ease, not for general understanding. Ergo the confusion for non-natives. Heck even I have problems when I travel outside of my home region...dialects and accents abound everywhere.

    Ciao,

    Sweet T.
     
  35. te gato

    te gato Senior Member

    Calgary, Alberta
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Hey MZ;
    Heck..You Too???....:D
    Yes we do shorten it for ease...but you have to admit that it is understandable...at times..
    Now i'm goin' to go get me a coffee...
    te gato;)
     
  36. la grive solitaire

    la grive solitaire Senior Member

    United States, English
    How about "Gotcha!" -- short for "Got you!". I've rarely (if ever:) ) heard it used except in the shortened form.

    "Okay, gotcha! (Okay, I understand what you mean/are saying).

    "Gotcha!" (I caught you!)
     
  37. mzsweeett

    mzsweeett Senior Member

    USA
    USA, American English
    I just gots me some Godiva chocolates.....wanna go 'n eat 'em with me?? LMAO :D :D :D

    Sweet T.
     
  38. Why Not?

    Why Not? Senior Member

    Germany
    German
    You too: Have a nice time! - "You too!" (or "Same to you!")

    Same to you: I wish you good luck! - "Same [= good luck] to you!" but maybe not: 'You too!' as it would mean: 'You wish me good luck, too!'

    That's how it sounds to my ears, but I'm not a native speaker, just trying to apply some sort of logic ...

    Probably I'm terribly wrong with this.

    What do natives think as to the above examples?
     

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