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the spitting image

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Encolpius, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Hello, I'm quite perplexed because the verb spit in that idiom exists in both Hungarian and English. Is that a coincidence? So, I am asking you what idiom you use for a child who is a spitting image of his parents?

    Hungarian: kiköpött apja / anyja [köp to spit, kiköpött spitted out, apja his father, anyja his mother]
    Czech and Slovak: jako by otci z oka vypadl [it's also quite bizarre (spitting, falling from eyes :D)...lit.: as if he fell out of his father's eye]

    I hope I'll get more answer than the Hellenic & Russian one. :)

    Thanks / ευχαριστώ /спасибо!
     
  2. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    In French:
    "être le portrait craché de" (literally: be the spat portrait of)
     
  3. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    In Greek:

    Adj. «φτυστός, -ή, -ό» [fti'stos] (masc.) [fti'sti] (fem.) [fti'sto] (neut.) --> dead spit < Classical neut. noun «πτύσμα» ptŭsmă (Byz. Gr. «φτύσμα» phtysma) --> spit, sputum; PIE *(s)p(h)yēu-/*(s)pyu-/*sp(y)eu-, onomatopoeic imitative of spitting (cf Lat. spuere > It. sputare, Gr. «πτύω» ptŭō, Ger. speien, Dutch spuwen, Eng. spew/spit).

    E.g. "the newborn boy is «φτυστός» his father (or mother)"
     
  4. itreius Senior Member

    Assembly
    BCS

    spitting image of your father - pljunuti otac
    you're the spitting image of your father - pljunuti si otac

    otac - father
    pljunuti - (adj.) spitting (spitted?)
     
  5. ilocas2 Senior Member

    Bohemia
    Czech
    I just want to say that this is only Czech, not Slovak.
     
  6. ThomasK Senior Member

    (near) Kortrijk, Belgium
    Belgium, Dutch
    We'd say: je lijkt als twee druppels water op je vader (you look like your Dad like two drops of water)...
     
  7. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Fantastic example, the same as in Hungarian.
     
  8. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    In Portuguese the usual expression is a cara chapada, more or less "the printed image", often shortened simply to a cara, "the face".
    I believe I've also heard a cara escarrada, literally "the spitting image", but this comes off as rude in Portuguese. It's not something you'd say to somebody's face.
     
  9. apmoy70 Senior Member

    Greek
    We use that too: «Μοιάζετε σαν δύο σταγόνες νερό»
    ['mɲazete (2nd. pl. present ind. of verb «μοιάζω» ['mɲazo] (the palatal nasal /ɲ/ is not written but it's clearly pronounced) --> to be like, resemble < ancient «ὁμοιάζω» hŏmoi'azō) san 'ði.o sta'ɣones ne'ro]
    lit. "you look like two drops of water"
     
  10. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    I wonder which more languages know the two-drop-water example.... :idea:
     
  11. DearPrudence

    DearPrudence Dépêche Mod

    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    We have it too in French:
    "se ressembler comme deux gouttes d'eau" (literally: to look like each other like two drop of water)
    (but for some reason, I wouldn't quite use it for father and son)
     
  12. Ghabi

    Ghabi Moderator

    Cantonese (Hong Kong)
    Hi! In Cantonese we say the two come from the same "cake mold" (餅印, like this).
     
  13. Outsider Senior Member

    Portuguese (Portugal)
    To be more literal, I should have written:

    a cara chapada, "the printed face", often shortened simply to a cara, "the face".
    a cara escarrada, literally "the spitting face", but this comes off as rude in Portuguese. It's not something you'd say to somebody's face.

    As for "they look like two drops of water", we say a cara de um é a cara do outro, "the face of the one is the other one's face". With the obscene and derogatory variant a cara de um é o cu do outro, "the face of the one is the other one's arse".
     
  14. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    and it is possible in Italian, too: e su padre sputato....

    and I am not sure what native Catalans would say, but maybe they use, too: ser son pare escopit. (?)
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2013
  15. Grefsen

    Grefsen Senior Member

    Southern California
    English - United States
    I was curious to know what the origin was of this idiom and here's one of the explanations I found:

    http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1977/whats-the-origin-of-spitting-image
     
  16. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Wow, very interesting etymology!
     
  17. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    France
    USA Northeast
    It's funny to note that in Spanish the image is different, the image is nailed not spit

    Es clavado a su padre
    Es su padre clavado
     
  18. Thomas1

    Thomas1 Senior Member

    polszczyzna warszawska
    In Polish we say:
    wykapany/a tatuś/mama -- well, kind of hard to translate, but I'll give it a try: a dripped out daddy/mum
    być jakby skórę ściągnął z X -- to be as if one had flayed the skin of X
    być podobnym do kogoś jak dwie krople wody -- to be similar to someone like two drops of water (In a more idiomatic English: to be like two peas in a pod)
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  19. jmx

    jmx Senior Member

    Barcelona
    Spain / incorrect Spanish
    In Spanish another common expression for "very similar" is "como 2 gotas de agua" (like 2 drops of water). As far as I know, there is nothing with that meaning using the verb "escupir" (to spit).
     
  20. Ssola Senior Member

    Català - Barcelona
    Indeed, In Catalan we say "és una escopinada de sa mare". I've heard it few times. You can find it in the DCVB dictionary: http://dcvb.iecat.net/ "escopinada".
     
  21. Encolpius

    Encolpius Senior Member

    Prague
    Hungarian
    Oh, welcome to this forum and thank you for the interesting link, I haven't known it.
     
  22. germanbz Senior Member

    Benicàssim - Castelló - Spain
    Spanish-Spain/Catalan (Val)
    In Spanish there is another expression:

    Es la viva imagen de su abuelo/padre/madre.....

    It would be translated as: He/her is the "living image" or his/her.....
     

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