Then I said <?> wait a minute, [punctuation]

Discussion in 'English Only' started by uruj asif, Sep 27, 2004.

  1. uruj asif New Member

    Pakistan/Urdu
    So, which one is better?

    Then I said; wait a minute, I want to go too.
    Then I said, wait a minute, I want to go too.
    Then I said: wait a minute, I want to go too.
     
  2. LadyBlakeney

    LadyBlakeney Senior Member

    Madrid
    Spain
    I believe it is the third one, but I am not a hundred per cent sure.
     
  3. Sharon

    Sharon Senior Member

    United States, English
    I would do it like this:
    Then I said, "Wait a minute, I want to go, too." or
    Then I said, "Wait a minute...I want to go, too."
     
  4. Silvia B

    Silvia B Senior Member

    Italy - Italian
    The best is:
    Then I said: "wait a minute, I want to go too".
     
  5. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English

    These are both correct.
     
  6. Pearl Senior Member

    Barcelona (Catalonia)
    Spain - Catalan, Spanish, English, Icelandic
    I would say:

    Then I said: -Wait a minute, I want to go too-.
     
  7. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    But this would not be correct punctuation in English. An English teacher would mark you wrong. You need the quotation marks "" for written speech.
     
  8. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Sharon is correct. The quotation should be preceded by a coma, begin with quotation marks, and, because it is a complete sentance, Wait should be capitalized. All three of Jacinta's original choices were incorrect.

    El inglés es un lío.
     
  9. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    I think this was written in error? Could you clarify it, if not?
     
  10. Sharon

    Sharon Senior Member

    United States, English
    Cuchufléte, it was not Jacinta's question!

    "El inglés es un lío." Does this mean "The English is a mess/muddle." (??) Does that refer to these examples in particular, or just the language in general? (I admit we have some picky rules, and sometimes the spelling is crazy.)
     
  11. Focalist Senior Member

    European Union, English
    Wait a minute. I want a go too. :)

    My preference would be for:

    Then I said, "Wait a minute. I want to go too."

    F
     
  12. cuchuflete

    cuchuflete Senior Member

    Maine, EEUU
    EEUU-inglés
    Jacinta--

    Please accept my sincere apologies.

    It was not you who offered the three incorrect choices!

    I will try to be more careful in the future.

    I willingly accept whatever punishment you think appropriate, so long as it doesn't require me to get it right the first time.

    Cuchu [humbled and ashamed]
     
  13. Silvia B

    Silvia B Senior Member

    Italy - Italian
    Anyway... I think the simbols - .... - are used just in books, but not at school.
    I don't know if there is that difference between italian and english, I used the italian rule, but when I was learning English, noone told me there was that difference in writing.
    When you have to write something someone said, you put the : and then you write the phrase between " ".
    Example -> I said: "This is unfair!"
    There are no other way...

    Correct me if I am wrong..
     
  14. Focalist Senior Member

    European Union, English
    Silvia, you can use a colon ( : )

    She said: "It doesn't matter."

    but it's much more usual to use a comma ( , )

    She said, "It doesn't matter."

    It is important, though, to start the quoted words with a capital letter.

    F.
     
  15. Silvia B

    Silvia B Senior Member

    Italy - Italian
    Thanks.
    So, there is difference between Italian and English.

    Bye!
     
  16. jacinta Senior Member

    California
    USA English
    Dear cuchu: I know it was an error. I just like to have a cleared record and an untarnished reputation!! Absolutely no hard feelings. Please lift your head now and continue your great offerings to this forum.
     
  17. Sharon

    Sharon Senior Member

    United States, English
    Silvia, not to argue with Focalist, but according to my "book of rules," you would use the colon to introduce long quotations (more than one sentence) or a quotation not introduced by such words as said, remarked, and stated. (Any word that indicates you are about to quote, asked, and commented would be other examples.)
     
  18. quehuong Senior Member

    Vietnam, Vietnamese
    from Uruj Asif

    from Focalist.

    from Sharon.

    =========

    For Standard American English and Mechanics, I would choose Sharon's. I would go with Focalist's choice if the teacher weren't a picky, rigid person. Focalist's choice makes the short sentences in those quotation marks look less cumbersome. Try to read the words aloud and you'll see the effect that commas can create.
     
  19. sb70012

    sb70012 Senior Member

    Azerbaijani
    Hello,
    These are my questions:
    Can't we really use ":" after the word "said"?
    Can we omit "," after the word "go"?
    Can we put only one "." after the word minute?

    Thank you so much.
     
  20. Florentia52 Modwoman in the attic

    Wisconsin
    English - United States
    Yes, you could use a colon after "said," although a comma is customary.

    Some people would omit the comma between "go" and "too."

    Yes, you could use a period instead of an ellipsis.
     
  21. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    I would definitely omit the comma between "go" and "too", because that sentence wouldn't normally be said with any pause before "too"; also because I can see no grammatical reason for having a comma there.

    Ws:)
     
  22. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    I agree on the use of the colon and the comma.

    I was taught that "too," when used to mean "also," should always be set off by commas.

    You should never use more than one period (.)! An ellipsis (...), if used, should be separated by spaces from the words before and after it: "Wait a minute ... I want to go, too."

    And finally, if it is indeed urgent (as it says in the thread title) I would use an exclamation point at the end: "I want to go, too!"
     
  23. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Did anyone ever tell you why, RM1? It seems to fly in the face of grammatical wisdom. I tried to find out more about this "rule", which many American sources refer to (most of them disagreeing with it), but none seems able to say where it came from or why it should be.

    The Gregg Reference Manual states boldly that it shouldn't be done when "too" is at the end of a sentence. The much-quoted Chicago Manual of Style says "Use commas with too only when you want to emphasize an abrupt change of thought: He didn’t know at first what hit him, but then, too, he hadn’t ever walked in a field strewn with garden rakes". Clearly there's no abrupt change of thought in "I want to go too".

    Many other sources decry this mysterious "rule"; I couldn't find any that support it (present company excepted?
    ;)).

    Ws
    :)
     
  24. natkretep

    natkretep Moderato con anima

    Singapore
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    The comma is much more frequent in BrE.

    If you look at British published material, single inverted commas (quotation marks) are common:
    I think I wouldn't generally pause between go and too and so would usually not have a comma there.
     
  25. Cagey post mod

    California
    English - US
    This link leads discussions of the comma before 'too'. comma too

    There are eight threads, discussing use of the comma in sentences of varying lengths. There is not universal agreement on the topic. :)
     
  26. RM1(SS)

    RM1(SS) Senior Member

    Connecticut
    English - US (Midwest)
    That, I believe, was fourth-grade grammar, meaning that it was almost 50 years ago; if any explanation was given, I've forgotten the fact. I believe it was just presented as a rule, like everything else: This Is the Way It Is Done.

    My wife, who is seven years younger than I and went to school in a different part of the country, says that she was taught no such rule.
     
  27. Wordsmyth

    Wordsmyth Senior Member

    Location: Mostly SW France
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Ah, one of those "rules". If they have no reasoning behind them, I tend to think of them rather as rumours — because they start as one person's quirky idea, then spread without anyone knowing the source. In the days before we had 'instant communication', the process was gradual, and their disappearance was correspondingly slow. Nowadays such things go viral quickly, but are often equally quickly quashed. All the signs are that that one's well on its way to the garbage can (unless it gets recycled ;)).

    Ws:)
     

Share This Page