Thereby, therefore, thus ???

Discussion in 'English Only' started by wormhole, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. wormhole Senior Member

    Bochum,Germany
    Turkish
    Currently, I'm writing my master thesis using these words very much as conjunctions to give the meaning of 'because of that', 'for that reason' and 'in doing so'. In order to provide a better understanding of how I'm using them, I'll give some examples.

    As a matter of fact, almost no system is purely deterministic; therefore, some drawbacks in comparison to stochastic simulations arise, such as ...

    Deterministic approaches can give us a hint about one possibility that the system under the observation might undergo, and; thereby (thus), other possibilities are left out.


    I'm not sure if the examples show what I have in my mind as a difference between 'therefore' and 'thereby,thus', but I would like to know the exact difference among them if there is. In some of the local English grammar books, it is mentioned that they can be used interchangeably, and this causes some confusion.
     
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I agree with what those local English grammar books have told you. "Thereby", "therefore", and "thus" mean roughly the same thing. "Thereby" means "by this/that" and "therefore" means "for this/that". "Thus" is probably the shortest and handiest one of the lot. All sound formal, which seems appropriate for your text.
     
  3. wormhole Senior Member

    Bochum,Germany
    Turkish
    Hi owlman5,

    So you are saying that the usage in the above examples is correct. (By the way, those are my sentences.)But it seems not possible to me to use 'thereby' in the first example instead of 'therefore'. What do you think about that?
     
  4. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    I agree. Therefore works better to express "for this reason". As we don't usually say "by this reason", "therefore" seems better.
     
  5. wormhole Senior Member

    Bochum,Germany
    Turkish
    Thanks a lot. You have helped me get rid of my doubts about the usage of them.
     
  6. JamesM

    JamesM à la Mod

    Another way to look at it is to replace "thereby" with "by doing so":

    "Deterministic approaches can give us a hint about one possibility that the system under observation might undergo, and, by doing so, leave out other possibilities."


    It doesn't seem to make much sense in this context, unless deterministic approaches exclude all but one possibility.
     
  7. wormhole Senior Member

    Bochum,Germany
    Turkish
    Hi JamesM,

    I think I do not get your point. The change you made in the sentence is clear, but I could't get what it is that does not make much sense. Please explain it a little bit more.

    Just to give more information about deterministic models if it is the case you have pointed out: Deterministic models used in simulations can take only one probable scenario into account, but in reality there are many probable scenarios that a system might undergo due to the uncertainties such as geometric properties, material properties and etc.
     
  8. wormhole Senior Member

    Bochum,Germany
    Turkish
    By the way, I would like to ask one more question about the usage of them.

    As far as I was taught at high school, there must be a semicolon before 'therefore, thereby and thus' if the preceding sentence does not end with a full stop. Another use of them is after full stop, and a comma must be placed right after them. But what if they are used after 'and'?

    .... ; therefore, .... => ok
    .... . Therefore, .... => ok
    ...., and; therefore, ... ??? or ..., and, therefore, ... ????
     

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