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thickened cream

Discussion in 'English Only' started by Gioiosa, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. Gioiosa

    Gioiosa New Member

    USA
    Italian
    Is thickened cream the UK's version of heavy whipping cream or is it clotted cream?
     
  2. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    Hello Gioiosa, and welcome to the forum,

    A number of members are quite hot on cooking methods and ingredients, so I'm surprised you've had to wait for an answer.

    I'm an expert on creams in France, but not in the UK. People in the UK talk of single cream, which is thin, double cream, which is thick but not thick enough to stand a teaspoon, and clotted cream which is thick enough to stand a teaspoon. Whipping cream is very runny before it's whipped, thinner maybe than single cream. I've never seen thickened cream on sale, or heard it spoken of as a cooking ingredient. I would take it to be cream which had been thickened by whipping. Have you come across it in an English recipe? A bit of context might help. It usually does.

    The English have taken to using crème fraîche, which is a form of mildly sour treated cream which can be boiled without curdling; obviously this is handy in cooking. I expect you have it in Italy. The English for it is crème fraîche.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  3. Redshade Senior Member

    UK
    English.
    Hi.
    In the UK single cream contains 18% fat ,
    whipped cream 35%,
    double cream 48% and clotted cream 55%.
    (I just sneaked alook at the Jamie Oliver website.)
     
  4. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    As I don't know what Gioiosa means by thickened cream I really shouldn't be answering :)
    But there are some existing threads that have discussed the differing terminologies for cream around the world. For example:
    "fresh whipped cream"
    Hmmm - I thought there were more :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  5. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    WIKI lists the normal terminology used for cream of different fat content in the US and the UK.
    It doesn't include thickened cream.

    When ThomasT says that cream is not "thick enough to stand a teaspoon" he is suggesting that if you put a teaspoon upright in the cream the spoon will fall over. In really thick cream the spoon would not fall over - such cream is thick enough to stand a teaspoon.
     
  6. Gioiosa

    Gioiosa New Member

    USA
    Italian
    I'm trying to to make a tiramisù recipe from a UK recipe. In part the ingredients are 1 tspn gelatin, 1 Tbspn water, 3000ml tub thickened cream, 250g tub mascarpone. The directions in part are:

    . Combine instant coffee, caster sugar and boiling water in a medium bowl. Stir untilsugar is dissolved. Add coffee-flavoured liqueur. Cool.

    . Meanwhile, to make filling, sprinkle gelatin over water in a small heatproof jug.
    Stand jug in a pan of simmering water. Stir until gelatin is dissolved. Remove.
    . Beat thickened cream and caster sugar in a small bowl of electric mixer until soft
    peaks
    form. Add mascarpone and beat until just combined. With motor operating,
    beat in gelatin mixture.

     
  7. Thomas Tompion Senior Member

    Southwest France
    English - England
    It sounds to me as though it means thick cream, Gioiosa. It's hard to get in France, I know, though there are ways. Crème fraîche will not do - it's nothing like rich enough, and it has a sour taste. After all this is clearly a recipe for people who aren't concerned about their figures; there's no point in making a dish like this unless it's really rich. My advice is, if you are still unclear, go on the Italian-English forum and find out the Italian for double cream. I have ideas about that but this is an English only forum.
     
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2008
  8. Gioiosa

    Gioiosa New Member

    USA
    Italian
    Thank you. I will try your suggestion, but if I fail to receive an answer, I will do some experimenting by simmering a pint of heavy whipping cream to reduce it by 1/4th.


     
  9. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    From my exhaustive research into this somewhat out-of-scope question :) I am reasonably confident that this is what would be called in the UK double cream. It's thick, but pours slowly if necessary. Take care, though, not to use 3000ml of it. That would be ten times too much. I expect that was a typo for 300ml ;)

    (Double cream - 48% milk fat.)
     
  10. Gioiosa

    Gioiosa New Member

    USA
    Italian
    I am beginning to think you are correct on your interpretation of thickened cream. And yes, it should be 300ml.

    I will post the same question on the Italian-English forum to see what response I will receive from those members.

    Thanks

     
  11. You can't buy anything called 'thickened cream' in the UK or the US.

    I've never heard of it.

    Rover
     
  12. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    We're way out of scope here, but if I were making what Gioiosa is making I would use double cream, no problem.

     
  13. cycloneviv

    cycloneviv Senior Member

    Perth, Western Australia
    English - Australia
    Are you sure this recipe is from the UK? There is a product called "Thickened Cream" available here in Australia. I'm sure we've had a thread about this in the past and will just nip out of the thread and look for it, and/or other information for you...

    No, I can't find the thread. I must have been mistaken.

    Anyway, this is from Dairy Australia's website:

    Thickened Cream (regular or reduced fat)
    With 35% and 18% milk fat, it contains additives such as gelatin (sic), vegetable gum or other modifying agents. The additives act as thickening agents, making it easier to whip and less likely to separate or curdle.

    Whipped, it is ideal in cake fillings, mousses, ice creams and cheesecakes.


    Personally, I'm almost certain there are things sold as "Thickened Cream" that do not contain any modifying agent, but perhaps I'm deluding myself about that.

    EDIT: I just did a Google search and found this recipe on an Australian website...
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2008
  14. Gioiosa

    Gioiosa New Member

    USA
    Italian
    Thanks for the explanation. Your reply, coupled with an earlier one indicating that the U.S.A. heavy cream is acceptable, makes sense.


    I can't guarantee that the original recipe was from the U.K; it could very well have been from Australia. I am only positive that it is not a U.S.A. recipe.


    Visited your country some years ago. You have a beautiful country.

    Thanks again
     
  15. Tuloosletrek New Member

    Australian
    Thickened cream is sold in Australia. It is dairy cream to which 'thickeners' e.g. gelatine, have been added. Search "CHOICE online" with word references to: Cream and sour cream/Label lingo
     

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