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This is to bring your kind notice.....

Discussion in 'English Only' started by fresh123, Jan 11, 2010.

  1. fresh123 Junior Member

    India
    Urdu
    Hi,
    In e-mail, which is the correct expression?
    This is to bring to your kind notice.......
    or
    This is to bring your kind notice.....




    Thanks
     
  2. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    This is to bring to your attention... (but, as always, depends on the context: is it good news or bad news?).
     
  3. Wishfull Senior Member

    jp
    Hi. I'm a non-native English speaker.

    I searched Google with "This is to bring to your kind notice" and hit 28,500.
    I searched Google with "This is to bring your kind notice" and hit 124,000.

    Both are used, but the latter is about four times as frequently as used.
     
  4. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    Neither of your forms is employed here, Wishfull. The first one makes grammatical sense, but the second does not: notice is not something that you can bring when you contact another person; the preposition "to" is required.
     
  5. Nunty

    Nunty Modified

    Jerusalem
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Both of those expressions got a relatively low number of hits. This is because it is not the usual turn of phrase a native would use.

    The phrase we would use depends on the context. Can you tell us a bit more?
     
  6. Wishfull Senior Member

    jp
    Hi.
    Thank you for your native's advices.

    But I still wonder, the websites I hit were all written by non-native English speaking people.

    For example; http://www.holytrinitychurchdubai.org/Hall Booking Form.pdf
    (The head website of the results)

    This seems an official format. Was this written by a non-native English?
    I still don't think so..... Well, there are some Arabic letters in the church's name...
    OK. This was probably written by a non-native English speaker.

    So the expression was invented by non-native people.....
    Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010
  7. Nunty

    Nunty Modified

    Jerusalem
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    Yes, it seems to have been written by a non-native. (You will note that it is from Dubai.) There are other errors, too.
     
  8. Wishfull Senior Member

    jp
    Thank you for your reply.

    I must be more careful.
    I will try to find where to look, when I want to know it is from Dubai.
    I will try to find other errors too.
    Thanks again.:)

    edit; I think I could find where it is.
    And once I know it is written by non-native, and there are errors, every word suddenly became suspicious to me.

    And this time, I wonder a Johnson George (Administrative Manager) who seems to be a native, didn't check the website.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010
  9. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    I see Dubai. Native English-speaking expatriates often must write what their employers tell them to write, whether it's good English or not. The over-courteous "kind notice" sort of thing is quite common in Asia and the Middle East -- and not something that a native English speaker would normally write in his hometown. So you need to look beyond writers to the writers' employers.

    In your examples, you can use "This is to bring to your kind notice..." if you absolutely must. But "This is to bring to your attention..." would be much more common. Or even, "We would like to inform you...."

    As I asked earlier, What is the context? And do you have someone telling you how to write?

    Your second version -- "This is to bring your kind notice...." -- is simply wrong unless I go through linguistic contortions to put something after it that makes sense: This is to bring your kind notice to the curtains at the far end of the conference room which have burst into flame.
     
  10. fresh123 Junior Member

    India
    Urdu
    Hi,
    Thanks for your valuable discussion.
    My sentence is "This is to bring to your kind notice that we are not working on Sunday"
    or
    "This is to bring your kind notice that we are not working on Sunday"

    Copyright, could you please explain the change of sentence with good or bad news?
     
  11. Copyright

    Copyright Senior Member

    Penang
    American English
    We would like to call your attention to the fact that you have not yet paid your rent for January.
    We would like to inform you that we will not be working this Sunday, 17 January 2010.
     
  12. fresh123 Junior Member

    India
    Urdu
    Thanks a lot, Copyright.
     
  13. panjandrum

    panjandrum PongoMod

    Belfast, Ireland
    English-Ireland (top end)
    "This is to bring to your kind notice" appears most frequently in association with India.
    It sounds, to me, like the kind of courtesy expression commonly used in Indian business English.
    It may therefore be entirely correct, and appropriate, for fresh123 to use it.
     
  14. sound shift Senior Member

    Derby (central England)
    English - England
    I was going to say something along the same lines. The example sentences are from Dubai, where expatriate Pakistanis make up much of the workforce, so it may not be inappropriate for fresh123, who is Indian, to write "This is to bring to your kind notice".
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010

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